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Historic Quincy's Hometown Weekly/ Newspaper 




Quincy 



/ 



MA 



JANUARY 



JUNE 



2008 



MICROFILMED 



2008 



MICROFILMED BY: 




New England 
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40 Hudson Street - Suite C 
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A Christmas Menz 

Family Won't Forget 

- Page 3 • 




The Q-11.in.c3r 



Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL.40 No. 16 



Thursday, January 3, 2008 




MAYOR WILLIAM PHELAN with Quincy firefighters in front of one of three new l>phoon fire engines pur- 
chased by the city. The three new engines represent the largest investment in new fire apparatus in more than 25 
years. The new engines will be deployed to Wollaston, North Quincy, and Quincy Point 



Extends Open Invitation "^% 
To Inaugural Reception 

Koch To Take 

Oath Monday 

As 33rd Mayor 



Farewell Message 



Phelan Leaving 
^Extremely Proud' 



><a<iiaew^'-ii«#%« 



Of Accomplishments 



The past six years have provided 
me with the unparalleled honor as 
serving as the Mayor of the city 
which I grew up in and love. I can- 
not properly explain to you how 
great an honor it was to serve as 
your mayor. 

And I truly never intended to run 
for mayor. I became involved in 
politics over an issue of paramount 
importance to the education of my 
children; and children throughout 
the city. 1 sought help to address a 
glaring weakness in our school sys- 
tem and that plea for help fell on 
deaf ears, forcing more dehberative 
action. That decision to originally 
run for School Committee in 1999 
led me on a journey that would 
have been unimaginable at the out- 
set. 

None of the successes the city 
has experienced would have been 
possible without the efforts and 
support of the entire organization; 
from department heads, and man- 
agers, police, fire, teachers, cleri- 
cal, pubhc works, parks and all City 
personnel. 

My wife, Tracey, and children 
Rachael, Brianne, Kerry, and Will- 
iam Arthur deserve my gratitude for 
the ultra-important role they have 
played in guiding and supporting 
me throughout the past six years. 
They have lived all aspects of be- 
ing part of a family in the Umehght 
with dignity and pride and I am 
truly blessed as both a husband and 




WILLIAM PHELAN 

father. 

I leave office extremely proud 
of the accompUshments of my ad- 
ministration and hopeful for the 
future of our great city. Quincy is a 
city with a bright future, a future 
that will include revitahzation of 
our downtown, a new state-of-the- 
art Quincy High School, the cre- 
ation of a new waterfront park at 
Broad Meadows, and energy effi- 
cient schools and municipal build- 
ings throughout the city. 

I am extremely proud of the fi- 
nancial strength of the city. I leave 
behind the largest Stabilization or 
"Rainy Day" fund in city history. 
We have grown our reserves from 
a deficit of $5 milUon to a surplus 
of approximately $12 million in 
just six years. Our reserves will 
help stabihze the residential tax rate 
and weather any potential crises in 



the foreseeable future. We have 
helped create a predictable climate 
for our residential taxpayers while 
concurrently balancing the tax rate 
for the past four years to a level 
lower than any other city in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Our $2.6 million Free Cash Re- 
serve from the prior fiscal year can 
also help the new administration 
deal with any outstanding issues 
such as unresolved employee con- 
tracts, debt payments on our energy 
management program, potential 
snow costs, and other budgetary 
situations that arise during the 
course of the current fiscal year. 

Quincy's bond rating has been 
increased twice by both Moody's 
and Standard and Poor's, two pres- 
tigious Wall Street financial firms 
that have recognized Quincy's 
sound financial management. 

But our success is no accident; 
it was the result of prudent finan- 
cial planning and a discipline of 
best-practices financial manage- 
ment. My administration imple- 
mented financial planning philoso- 
phies across the spectrum of local 
government. Our Payment Man- 
agement Plan not only paved more 
than 100 streets, it established a 
long-term planning tool for invest- 
ment in our infrastructure. Our 
Capital Improvement Plan ad- 
dressed much-needed repairs to 
schools and city buildings in a sys- 
(Cont'dOnPagell) 



By TOM HENSHAW 

There'll be a touch of grandeur 
to the inauguration of Quincy's 
33rd mayor which takes place 
Monday, Jan. 7, at 10 a.m. in the 
august ballroom of the Quincy 
Marriott Hotel with its capacity of 
more than 1 ,000 people. 

And there'll be a touch of the 
common man, too. 

"I want to invite every Quincy 
resident to this celebration of our 
great city," said Mayor-to-be Tom 
Koch. "It will be a great event 
where the entire community can 
come together, have a good time 
and celebrate Quincy's future." 

Mayor Thomas P. Koch, to give 
him his formal title, will take the 
oath of office from City Clerk Jo- 
seph P. Shea shortly after 10 
o'clock, following it up with his 
inaugural address. 

A gala reception will be held in 
the Marriott Balhoom at 7 p.m. fea- 
turing the music of the popular 




TOM KOCH 

band Java Jive and a disc jockey. 
The gala is free and open to the 
pubHc. 

Members of the City Council, 
all of them reelected, will be sworn 
in by Shea and reorganize for the 
2008-09 year, electing a new presi- 
dent, probably Jay Davis of Ward 
4, who will deUver his remarks. 

(Cont'd On Page 13) 





I 



'*<«iw*r;-; 



SNOWMAN GREETS visitors at the WiUiam Flynn Playground on Ehn 
Street Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 




III 



4 • 7 • "0 ft • 1 • 



Plan A VS. Plan E - Page 2 ■ Winter Safey Tips -Page 4 



n^ 



As Seen By Frank McCauley 



The Rise Of Plan A And Fall Of Plan E 



By FRANK McCAULEY 

Shortly after 10 a.m. on 
Monday, January 7, 2008, 
Thomas Koch will take over 
the oath of office as Quincy's 
.^3rd mayor. Mayor Koch 
will he the 3()th individual to 
serve as Quincy's mayor 
since Charles H. Porter was 
inaugurated as the city's first 
mayor on Jan. 7, 1889. 

The discrepancy between 
the 33rd mayor and the 30th 
individual comes about be- 
cause three mayors served 
split terms in office. Gustave 
Bates was the 1 4th and 1 7th 
mayor while Charles A. Ross 
was the 20th and 22nd and 
Thomas S. Burgin was the 
21st and 23rd mayor. 

The city's original charter 
was drafted by two Quincy 
lawyers, Josiah Quincy and 
Sigoumcy Butler. The pro- 
posed charter was passed by 
(he legislature, signed by the 
governor and adopted at a 
special town meeting held on 
Monday. June II. 1 888. The 
vote was 812 in favor and 
454 against the charter 
change. 

The charter, referred to as 
a "Homemade Charter" due 
to the fact that it was drafted 
by local citizens, provided 
for a mayor who would be 
the city's executive officer, 
as well as a 23 member city 
council. Voters of each of 
Quincy's six wards would 
elect three individuals to 
serve as ward councilors 
while the residents of the 
entire city would elect five 
individuals to serve as coun- 
cilors at large. Temis of of- 
fice were to be of one year 
duration. The school com- 
mittee would be comprised 
of nine members, one mem- 
ber from each of the six 
wards and three members 
elected by the citizens of the 
whole city. 

School committee mem- 




FRANK McCAULEY 

bers would serve staggered 
terms of three years duration. 

The original charter was 
in effect for 28 years (1 889- 
1916). During that period 14 
individuals served as mayor, 
an average of one every two 
years. 
PLAN A PHASE TWO 

During the early I900's 
dissatisfaction arose with the 
so-called "Homemade Char- 
ter" form of government. 
City council meetings were 
often lengthy, sometimes 
running into the early morn- 
ing hours and annual elec- 
tions were placing a burden 
on the election department. 

In 1915, the state legisla- 
tors adopted legislation cre- 
ating standard forms of char- 
ters, including Plans A,B,C 
and D. in 1938 the legisla- 
ture added Plan E to the list 
of standard city charters. 

At the national election 
held on Tuesday, November 
7, 1916. the question of 
whether to adopt a standard 
Plan A charter was on the 
ballot. The results of the 
election showed that the Plan 
A (a strong mayor, weak 
council) form of government 
was adopted by Quincy vot- 
ers by a vote of 2,616 in fa- 
vor and 2,025 in opposition. 

In early January 1917, 
Joseph L. Whiton was sworn 
into office as Quincy's first 



Plan A mayor. Under the pro- 
visions of the new charter the 
mayor would be elected for 
a term of two years while a 
city council of nine members 
elected at large, would serve 
staggered terms of two years. 
The mayor would serve stag- 
gered terms of three years. 

The "strong mayor- weak 
council" stemmed from the 
fact that under the Plan A 
Charter the mayor could ap- 
point his department heads 
without confirmation by the 
city council. The Plan B 
Charter form of government 
requires the mayor to submit 
his nominations for the vari- 
ous city department heads 
for the council's ratification 
(approval). Hence, the Plan 
B charters are referred to as 
"the weak mayor-strong 
council" form of govern- 
ment. 

The City of Quincy was 
governed under the Plan A 
Charter for 33 years. (1917- 
1949). Several amendments 
to this charter were adopted 
by the voters, among them: 

An act passed in 1920 
providing for Ward Council 
representatives. 

An act passed in 1926 
providing for preliminary 
(primary) elections. 

An act passed in 1941 
eliminating staggered elec- 
tion for council and school 
committee. 

During this 33 year period 
seven individuals served as 
Quincy's mayor. 

Joseph Whiton, 4 years; 
William Bradford, 2 years; 
Gustave Bates, 2 years; 
Perley Barbour, 2 years; 
Thomas McGrath, 6 years; 
Charles Ross, 9 years plus; 
and Thomas Burgin, ap- 
proximately 8 years. 

The average tenure of a 
mayor during this period was 
slightly under 5 years. Three 
of the incumbent mayors. 



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QUINCY'S nRST Plan E mayor, Thomas S. Bw^n (left) and first City Manager William J. 
Deegan, Jr. Burgin also served as Han A mayor. 



Bradford in 1922, Bates in 
1924 and McGrath in 1932, 
were defeated for re-elec- 
tion. 

PLAN E - CITY 
MANAGER FORM 
OF GOVERNMENT 
Shortly after Gov. 
Leverett Saltonstall signed 
into law in 1938, legislation 
that provided for the city 
manager form of govern- 
ment (Plan E), a group of 
Quincy citizens obtained suf- 
ficient signatures to have the 
question of a charter change 
placed on the ballot in the 
November 1938 state elec- 
tion. The proposal was de- 
feated by a wide margin 
(yes) 11,598, (no) 17,029. 

The group once again ob- 
tained enough signatures to 
place the issue before the 
voters in the November 1940 
presidential election. Once 
again the proposal went 
down to defeat (yes, 1 1 , 1 39; 
(no 19,519). 

The issue did not come up 
during the war years (World 
War Two 1941-1945), how- 
ever, Plan E adherents ; made 
a third try in the city election 
held in 1947. This time they 
were successful; when the 
voters by a wide margin, (yes 
17,187, no 7,745) votes, a 
majority of 9,442 votes, 
adopted the Plan E form of 



government, to take effect on 
January. 2, 1950. 

Under Plan E, voters 
would elect seven individu- 
als to serve on the city coun- 
cil as councillors at large. 
The council would elect, by 
a majority vote, one of their 
members to serve as mayor. 

The mayor under Plan E 
would function much as the 
council presidents do under 
Plan A form of government. 
He or she would serve as 
chairperson of the school 
committee, however, the 
chief executive officer of the 
city would be elected by the 
city council and would hold 
the title of city manager. 
PLAN E COMES 
TO QUINCY 

On Monday, January 2, 
1950, Quincy's first Plan E 
council was sworn into of- 
fice. The seven member city 
council unanimously elected 
Councillor Thomas S. 
Burgin, a former Plan A 
mayor and the top vote-get- 
ter in the November 1949 
election, as Quincy's first 
Plan E mayor. The council 
then unanimously elected 
William Deegan, the city 
manager in Superior, Wis- 
consin, city manager. 

The city manager form of 
government was based on 
the premise that while poli- 



ticians were good at winning 
elections they were not good 
at managing cities. 

The city manager, not 
having to face the city's vot- 
ers at election time, could 
concentrate on managing the 
affairs of the city govern- 
ment. In reality, a city man- 
ager had to satisfy and "keep 
happy" for members (a ma- 
jority) of the city council to 
keep his or her job. 

The Plan E city manager 
of govemment lasted eight 
(often stormy) years. Twice, 
Plan A adherents tried to 
place the question of a return 
to Plan A on the ballot and 
each time they fell short of 
the required number of sig- 
natures. Finally, in 1955 they 
succeeded in having the 
question of a charter change 
placed on the ballot in the 
November city election. 

On election day, Novem- 
ber 8, 1955, 65.2% of the 
voters went to the polls and 
returned Plan A to the city, 
effective January 6, 1958. 
14,378 (52.8%) voted in fa- 
vor while 12,851 (47.2%) 
voted against the return to 
Plan A. 

On Monday, January 2, 
1956, the city council orga- 
nized for the last time under 
the Plan E City Manager 
(Cont'd On Page 10) 



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Attorneys At Law 





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A Suprise Visit From Iraq 



A Christmas Menz Family Won't Forget 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Christmas Eve was indeed 
magical this year for the 
Menz family who celebrated 
a Christmas Eve Mass that 
they will likely never forget. 

The 5 o'clock Mass at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel 
Church, Holy Trinity Parish, 
Merrymount, was nearly over 
when Deacon John Menz, Jr., 
spoke to the assembly. 

E)eacon Menz said that a 
very special visitor had 
arrived. 

According to Doug Menz, 
the deacon then said, "The 
visitor had traveled further 
than Santa Claus" to be with 
them. 

To nearly everyone's 
surprise. Deacon Menz then 
introduced U.S. Army Sgt. 
Matthew Menz, 26., who was 
home on an unexpected 
leave. 

Sgt. Menz arrived in 
Boston at 2:30 p.m. 
Christmas Eve. He had 
traveled in planes for 1 5 hours 
from Baghdad where he is 
serving on active duty with 
the Yankee Division. 

No one, not even Sgt. 
Menz himself, expected him 
to get holiday leave this year. 
He was granted the leave on 
Dec. 20 and called his cousin 
that Thursday before 



beginning his journey from 
Baghdad to Kuwait to 
Germany to Atlanta to 
Boston. 

The sergeant's presence 
at the Mass surprised his 
father, Alan, his stepmother 
Denise, his sisters Judith and 
Michaeline, and his brother 
Tim, and nearly a dozen 
cousins, as well as the 500 
parishioners who gave him a 
warm welcome. 

Then, there was a very 
special treat for Sgt. Menz. 
He held the baby who was 
portraying the Christ-child in 
the church's Christmas 
pageant. 

Baby Jesus was played by 
Celia Kilhon, the six-month- 
old daughter of Matthew's 
sister Judith and her husband 
Ted of Abington. Ceha was 
the niece he had never seen 
or held as she was bom while 
Sgt. Menz was serving in the 
Middle East. 

"It was a pretty happy 
Mass," said Sgt. Menz. 

Douglas Menz arranged 
the family gathering at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel by 
calling family members and 
inviting them to the five 
o'clock Mass to pray with 
family member Deacon 
Menz. 

The reunion in Quincy 



was just the beginning for 
the young soldier who then 
drove 35 miles to Billerica 
where he also surprised his 
mother, Margaret Menz- 
Calabro and sister Kelly 
Nuijzynski. 

"She was shocked," he 
said. 

Sgt. Menz who expects to 
return to active duty in a few 
weeks said his holiday at 
home was a major surprise to 
him as well. He had planned 
to take his R and R leave in 
Costa Rica later this year but 
home is the only place to go 
at Christmas. 

During his holiday visit, 
Sgt. Menz compared notes 
on the current combat with a 
family friend David Becker 
of Braintree, a veteran of 
Worid War IL Both agreed 
that there are so many 
differences. 

In fact, Becker said that 
today's elusive enemy, the 
terrorist, makes this combat 
so difficult. "We had 
objectives. You guys are just 
sitting ducks." 

"We were on the move all 
the time," said Becker who 
lost his right arm while 
serving as a corporal in the 
78th Infantry Division. 

"They knew who the 
enemy was." Sgt. Menz said 




HOME FROM IRAQ — Sgt Matthew Menz (center) surprised his family and friends on 
Christmas Eve when he arrived home for a short leave from active duty in Iraq. Cousin Doug 
Menz (left) and family friend David Becker, (right) a World War II veteran, welcomed him home. 

Quincy Sun photo/Robert Bosworth 



but now, "They could be 
anyone. It's more of a guerilla 
(war)." 

Sgt. Menz described a 



halls," said Becker who who described prime rib 
described K rations that dinners for the soldiers on 
soldiers packed in the linings Sundays. 



of their field jacket and the 



terrorist attack in an army socks they needed to fend off 



mess hall when 21 soldiers 
were killed. The terrorist had 
posed as an Iraqi police 
officer when he entered the 
hall. 

Then, the two soldiers. 



trench foot in the cold 
dampness of Germany. 

In contrast, Sgt. Menz is 
serving in a desert where. 



Sgt. Menz will be back 
on the front line within the 
month. It is quiet there, now, 
he said. 

When he is discharged, 
he will live in Quincy and 
return to his job as a 



QHS Advisory Council Meets Jan. 10 

Quincy High School's the high 



"You don't have to worry 

about trench foot. The highest Weymouth firefighter, 
generations apart, compared temperature I saw was 125 Meanwhile, he's keeping 

other differences, degrees." up with hometown news 

particulariy food. "We have the best food in through a gift subscription to 

"We didn't have any mess the country," said Sgt. Menz The Quincy Sun. 



the high school. 
Parent Advisory Council will Coddington St. All 
meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, welcome. 
Jan. 10, in the Pride Room at 



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USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr., Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth, Editor 

50c per copy $25 00 per year by mail in QuirKy 
$30 00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $38.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy MA 02169 

Th« Quincy Sun assumes no hnancial responsibility lor typographical errors in 
advertisAitients but will repnnt that part ol an advertisement in wrhich the typographical 
error occurs 



i,-^ Moments 
in time 

THE HISTORY CHANNE 




•On Jan. 6, 1838, Samuel 
Morse's telegraph system is 
demonstrated for the first 
time at the Speedwell Iron 
Works in Morristown, NJ. In 
May 1 844, Morse sent tiie first 
official telegram over the first 
telegraph line, with the mes- 
sage: "What hath God 
wrought!" 

• On Jan. 4, 1935, Bill- 
board magazine publishes 
its first pop music chart. A 
song called "Stop! Look! 
Listen!" by jazz violinist Joe 
Vcnuii topped the first chart. 

• On Jan. 2, 1941, the 

Andrews Sisters record 
"Boogie Woogie Bugle 
Boy" on Decca Records. 
The song, which became a 
classic World War 11 hit. was 
heard in the Abbott and 
Costello film "Buck Pn- 
vatcs." The Andrews Sisters 
were the most popular "girl 
group" of their time. 

• On Jan 1, 1951, the 

2^nith Radio Corp. of 
Chicago demonstrates the 
first pay-per-view television 
system. The company sent 
movies over the airways via 
scrambled signals, and the 
300 families who participat- 
ed in the test could send tele- 
phone signals to decode the 



movies for $1 each. 

• On Dec. 31, 1972, Rober- 
to Clemente, future Hall of 
Fame baseball player, is 
killed when the cargo plane 
in which he is traveling 
crashes off the coast of Puer- 
to Rico. Clemente was on 
his way to deliver relief sup- 
plies to Nicaragua following 
a devastating earthquake. 

• On Jan. 5, 1982, a series 
of landslides near San Fran- 
cisco kills up to 33 people 
and closes the Golden Gate 
Bridge after the area 
received 24 inches of rain in 
two days. In all, about 7,800 
homes and businesses were 
seriously damaged. Dam- 
ages exceeded $100 million. 
Aerial surveillance showed 
that 18,000 separate slides 
occurred. 

• On Jan. 3, 2000, the last 
daily "Peanuts" comic strip 
is published in 2,600 news- 
papers as Charles Schulz 
retires. "Peanuts" first 
appeared in Oct. 1950. 
Charles Schulz died on Sat- 
urday. Feb 12, 2000 — on 
the eve prior to the publica- 
tion of his final Sunday 
"Peanuts" strip. He was 77. 

© 2007 King Features Synd., Inc. 



V7^777777?77777y77??77777?7?777777777y77777y7777f7777777?7777^7777^ 



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Joann's Special Present 




JIM 



JOANN 



It's probably none of my business, guys, but was your 
wife happy with what you gave her for Christmas? 

Or was she a little disappointed? Maybe hoping for 
something special. Something unique. Something re- 
ally different. Something she could hardly wait to tell 
her friends about. 

Like maybe the gift Joann Sheets got from her 
husband, Jim, the ^^^^^M J 

former mayor: a 
600-pound water 
buffalo. 

Sometime be- 
fore Christmas she 
said to him: 

"You know what 
I would really like for Christmas?" 

"What's that?" he asked. 

"A water buffalo," she said. 

"Oh, one of those skins you put water in?" he asked. 

"No," she said. "I mean a real live water buffalo." 

And, unfazed, he got her one. 

But you won't see it grazing in the Sheets' Furnace 
Brook Parkway backyard. 

And you won ' t see Joann with it on a leash at Black' s 
Creek. 

In fact, you won't see it anywhere in Quincy. 

It's in India. 

It seems Joann heard about Global Action, an inter- 
denominational, not-for-profit Christian ministry based 
in Colorado Springs, CO. 

One of their projects is creating a self-sufficient 
Christian community to raise orphans in a family set- 
ting with long-term foster parents and siblings. 

The goal is to provide a new world of opportunity for 
the children who otherwise would be confined to an 
orphanage. 

Global Action, with the help of donations, is devel- 
oping the community in a poor village in northern India. 

They are building houses that would each be home to 
seven orphans and foster parents. 

Many things are needed to make the conununity self- 
sufficient. Among them: water buffalos. 

Jim purchased one through Global Action in Calcutta 
to be assigned to one of the houses in the new commu- 
nity. 

"A water buffalo," notes Joann, "gives milk. So the 
children will have milk to drink and cheese made from 




A SPECIAL PRESENT 



milk to eat." 

And to help feed them more, Joann and Jim later 
ordered 10 chickens - one for each of their grandchil- 
dren - for the new com- 
munity. 

So now the children 
will have milk, cheese 
and eggs. 

Jim is running a fam- 
ily contest to name 
Joann's water buffalo. 

"Global Action," 
Joann says, "goes to the 
poorest of the poor." 

Dairy and poultry 
farms, a green house, shops, a medical clinic, sewing 
and welding machines and more water buffalos and 
chickens are needed to make the community self- 
sufficient. 

Global Action is located at 7660 Goddard St., Suite 
200, Colorado Springs, CO 80920-8236. Telephone: 
888-725-3707. 

"My water buffalo is one of the best gifts I have ever 
received," says Joann. "It made me feel so good this 
Christmas." 

In appreciation, Joann created a special Christmas 
card for Jim with a picture of a water buffalo on the front 
and this note inside: 

"Thanks, Jim, for a gift that will keep giving and 
giving for many years to come. I love it, and you, too." 

G 
THE RUMOR THAT Ward 2 Councillor Dan 
Raymondi will be the new Public 
Works Commissioner is still flying 
around town. But don't believe it. 

"No truth to it," says Raymondi. 
"I'm happy where I am - representing 
Ward 2." 

The rumor may have taken wing 
when Raymondi endorsed Mayor- 
elect Tom Koch over Mayor William Phelan. 

A Koch spokesman also says there's nothing to the 
rumor. 

G 
PERSONAL: Best wishes to Liz (Fitzpatrick) Allard, 
Kim DiBona and Cam Nguyen of Mayor William 
Phelan' s office. Thanks for all your help. 




RAYMONDI 



Be Prepared For Perils Of Winter 



^^ry^^^^^^^^^^y 



The December snow 
storm that struck just before 
Christmas served as a re- 
minder that, in spite of glo- 
bal warming, a winter in 
New England can be peril- 
ous to life and limb. 

"Now is the proper time 
for individuals and families 
to take the necessary steps to 
ensure their safety both on 
the roads and at home as we 
anticipate what will undoubt- 
edly come during this win- 
ter season," said Don Boyce, 
executive director of the 
Mass Emergency Manage- 
ment Agency (NffiMA). 

With that in mind, 
MEMA issued list of items 
you should keep in your car 
in case of emeigmcy during 
a winter ^wm: 

Flashlight witfi extra bat- 



teries, charged cell phone, 
basic first aid kit, necessary 
medications, pocket knife, 
blankets or sleeping bags, 
extra clothes (include rain 
gear, mittens, socks), high- 
calcnie, non-peridiable foods 
(dried fruits, nuts, canned 
goods), container of water, 
shovel, road flares, sand for 
generating traction, tires 
chains or traction mats, ba- 
sic tool kit (piers, wrench, 
screwdriver), tow rope, 
brightly colored clodi to uti- 
lize as a flag. 

Make sure your tires have 
adequate tread and keep your 
gas tank at least half full. 
Check your windshield 
wipo* fhud and keq) a wind- 
shield scraper and small 
fanxMD for ke md snow re- 
moval. 



Plan long trips carefully, 
listening to your car radio or 
NOAA (National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Agency) 
Weather Radio for the latest 
news, weather forecasts and 
road conditions. Travel dur- 
ing the day, and if possible 
try to take someone along 
with you. 

MEMA recommends diat 
the following items be kept 
around the house in case of 
emergency during a winter 
storm: 

Flashli^t and extra bat- 
teries, charged cell phone, 
portable radio or NOAA 
Weather Radio with extra 
batteries, basic first aid kit, 
ess^itial fnescription medi- 
cines, non-perishable food, 
nc»-electric can opeoia, wa- 
ver ((Nie gallon per person/ 



per day), baby items, pet 
food and supplies, extra 
blankets and sleeping bags^^ 
fire extinguisher. 

Check the condition of 
your fireplace and chimney. 
Ensure that your smoke de- 
tectors and carbon monoxide 
(CO) detectors are working 
properly. Always follow the 
manufacturer's instructions 
for proper use, installation, 
maintenance and testing pm- 
cedures. 

**Every household should 
develop a Family Emer- 
gency Communication Plan 
in case family members are 
separated from one anotl^r 
during a storm," said Boyce. 
"That is a real possibiUty 
during die day if adults are 
at work and children are in 

(Cont'd On Page 15) 



. J Ljiitf^ jtiti*,i*iitiri 



Thtt^sdaK JaAiury 3, >0W TlMi'Om»dy BuOtk' '^'Pa^ S *'^ 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS 1910 real photo postcard is a view of the Wollaston 
Tennis Club that v^as located on Everett Street between 
Beale and Granger Streets in Wollaston. This view is to 
the south: the two houses in the distance are on the op- 
posite side of Beale Street; the white one on the left is 
on the comer of Beale and Everett After nearly 100 
years, it is seemingly unchanged. The clubhouse, whose 
poreh is on the immediate right, is no longer standing, 
but was just next to the house, out-of-view, that is still 
^tanding on the comer of Granger and Everett Streets. 



The flat land used for the courts was later developed 
into the 26-unit Everett Court Apartments and the four- 
story brick Marion Apartments that are here today. The 
tennis club had used this land for over 10 years before 
the apartments were built Thanks to Tom Costello of 
Lincoln Avenue for helping to find the location of the 
tennis club. To contact Tom Galvin, e-mail 
tmgalvin@verizon.net 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



Plan A Returns As 

Delia Chiesa Takes 

Oath As Mayor 



ThibWeek 

1958 
SOYesatsAgp 



Rkadkrs F'orum 



Praise For Councillor McNamee 



I have been a resident of 
Squantum for over 25^ years 
and know only so well about 
plowing streets, especially 
when living on a dead end 
street. "Out of sight, out of 
mind." I really do have to 
call almost every snowstorm 
so they do not forget my 
street. 

I am also a subscriber to 
The Quincy Sun. The Dec. 20 
issue I was reading an article, 
"Councillors Blast Response 
To Snow, Ice Storm." It was 



very nice for what Ms. 
Rachel Picard had done on 
this terrible day. I think I 
have one better. 

I am a Disabled Vietnam 
Veteran, and have two hip 
replacements, and a lot of 
other things that we need not 
talk about. Councillor Brian 
McNamee knows about 
these conditions of mine. My 
hip had dislocated six times 
in the past from slipping on 
ice, or snow, including other 
events that one does on a 



daily basis. I am totally 
housebound if I am not 
plowed out, or sanded if 
there is ice. I had noticed in 
this issue of The Sun his 
name was not brought up and 
most likely the reason is be- 
cause he did not complain. 

After the first storm had 
passed, and we were not 
plowed out I had said: for- 
got us again. The second 
storm started up and 1 left a 
message for Brian and before 
I knew it the plow was here. 



but not alone. There was 
Brian right behind him. 
When the street was done, 
Brian stopped by and asked 
if it was done right and could 
I get out. 

I really do not know of 
many people would have 
done what he did, never 
mind a councillor. This is a 
true hero. 

Thank You Brian, 

From A Marine 

D.D. 



Concerned About Safety In Quincy Schools 



Could the schools in 
Quincy survive a Columbine 
type of attack? In this 
writer's professional and per- 
sonal opinion, the answer is 
absolutely no. 

I am appalled at the lack 
of safety in our schools. 
Maiiy of you may wonder 
how I could make such a 
statement like this especially 



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since I do not work in the 
school system. Well, I will 
tell you that I presently have 
five certifications in Death 
Education and Grief coun- 
seling. I have spent the last 
two years writing a paper on 
teenagers and death. I have 
talked to a number of school 
officials across this country, 
including a large number of 
people involved in the Col- 
umbine shooting. I also 
spoke to people in the city 
that are involved in the safety 
of our children. Unfortu- 
nately no one wanted to hear 
what I had to say. 

After speaking briefly to 
Mr. McPhee, the head of 
school security, the conver- 
sation left me feeling even 
more concerned. The super- 
intendent, so far, has failed 
to return any of my phone 
calls. The Mayor was too 
busy running for re-election 
to return my calls. I was able 
to speak with a pohce officer 
and was provided with some 



information I was looking 
for. Unfortunately, the infor- 
mation provided to me, only 
served to confirm my opin- 
ion about the poor security 
that exists in our schools. 

I was told that I could 
have four-minute and a half 
minutes to speak in front of 
the School Committee. 
However, four minutes in 
front of the school wouldn't 
even break the ice of the 
city's school safety. It was 
very interesting that at the 
last School Committee meet- 
ing several people were al- 
lowed to speak more than 
four minutes. If you don't 
beUeve me, just check out the 
re-run on cable channel 22. 1 
could never provide all the 
information in this brief col- 
umn. However the people of 
Quincy deserve to hear the 
facts. Every parent who sent 
their children to our schools 
should feel safety is a prior- 
ity. Unfortunately it is not. 



Just remember it took 41 
minutes for the Columbine 
shooters to kill 1 1 students, 
one teacher, wounding a 
number of other students be- 
fore killing themselves. As 
recently as three months ago, 
a student walked through the 
metal detector carrying a 
fully loaded weapon. 

Hopefully the new mayor 
will take school security 
more seriously than Mayor 
Phelan and other city offi- 
cials did. It is always easier 
to look the other way until 
something and happens. 
Most people believe it could 
never happen. Tell that to the 
students and professors at 
Virginia Tech. 

Lastly, it is my desire to 
present my information on 
school security to someone 
who cares about our chil- 
dren. 

Christina Randall 

Sea Street 

Quincy 



By FRANK McCAULEY 

The Plan A form of government returned to Quincy after 
an eight-year absence as Amelio 
Delia Chiesa was sworn into office. 

Delia Chiesa, who served as the 
ceremonial mayor under the Plan E- 
City Manager Charter for four years , 
deUvered his inaugural address in 
the City Council Chamber. 

The mayor called for, "a more equitable distribution of tax 
assessments throughout the city." He recommended that, 
"our Board of Assessors approach the New Year with a 
determined effort to bring about an equitable tax distribution 
of all properties in our city." 

Mayor Delia Chiesa' s other recommendations included: 

More off-street parking, retention of Old Colony passenger 
service and encouragement of further industrial development 
in areas zoned for industry. 

McINTYRE ELECTED COUNCIL PRESmENT 

Councillor James R. Mclntyre was unanimously elected 
president of the City Council at the organizational meeting of 
the new city council. 

The election was made unanimous after Councillor Thomas 
S. Burgin, a former mayor, requested that votes cast for him 
by Councillors Edna B. Austin and David S. Mcintosh be 
withdrawn. 

Mclntyre was nominated by Councillor Carl Anderson 
and the nomination was seconded by Councillor William C. 
ElUs. 

The new council president was starting his second two- 
year term on the council. Mclntyre is a graduate of Holy 

Cross College and a combat veteran of the Korean War. 
QUINCY-ISMS 

Kenneth Gardner, a former head clerk in the Water 
Department, was appointed as personnel director for the city 
by Mayor Delia Chiesa. . . Professor AUen Knight Chambers 
of Boston University was the scheduled speaker at the annual 
meeting of the combined Protestant Men ' s Clubs of Wollaston. 
The event will be held Jan. 23 at the Wollaston Methodist 
Church. . . Gerald Burke, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Burke, 
1 86 Rhoda St., Houghs Neck, returned to St. Francis Xavier 
Seminary at Miramar, Duxbury , after a two- week vacation at 
home. . . Shop'n Save Super Market, 20 Independence Ave., 
So. Quincy, was advertising "Fresh Veal Cutlets, $.69 a 
pound". . . Samuel Snidman and Joseph YanofT, long time 
members of the Quincy Jewish War Veterans Post were 
honored at the annual past commanders breakfast held at the 
Jewish Community Center. . . The Fred Astaire Dance Studios 
at 15 1 1 Hancock St., downtown Quincy, was offering "Four 
Private Lessons for Beginners, Only $9.50". . . D. Silverman 
and Sons Auto Dealers at 479 Washington St., Quincy Point, 
was inviting potential customers to come in and, "Drive the 
Year's Best Deal-the 1958 Edsel"... Calvin D. Black, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin W. Black, 504 Sea St., Adams Shore, 
accepted a Regular Army Commission as a second heuten^t, ; | 
while stationed at Fort Hood, Tex. . . Mayor Delia Chiesa, 
chairman of the School Committee, swore in members Dr. 
Charles Djerf, A. Wendell Clark and Dr. Edward S. 
Mann for four- year terms. . . Jay Olens, 5 Edgemere Rd., a 
member of Boy Scout Troop 45 and Donald Wilkinson, 9 
Granger St., of Troop No. 3, received their Eagle Scout 
awards . . . The Quincy Cooperative Bank, Hancock St., Quincy 
Center, announced that its current rate of dividend was, "3 1/ 
2 on All Savings Plans, Payable Four Times A Year"... 
"'Pursuit of the Graf Spec,' The Moat Famous Sea Chase in 
History," was showing at the Art Theater, Quincy Center. . . 
Leo A. Powers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Powers, 21 
Hobomack Rd., Merrymount, was commissioned a Marine 
Second Lieutenant. Lt. Powers is stationed at Quantico, 
VA. . . Larry Antonelli was chairman of the Quincy Lodge 
of Elks annual Italian Night dinner dance to be held Feb. 1 at 
the Elks Home, Hancock St., Quincy Center... John J. 
Walsh was installed as president of the Quincy Kiwanis Club 
at ceremonies held at the Neighborhood Club. Other officers 
included Gustaf E. Westhrin, treasurer and Richard H. 
O'Brien, vice-president. 






* » . r 



• •-.>**■. 



tfcdnday , ^aMuiiry. 



»^ 



Ai^TS & Entei^tainment 



Comedy Night Raises 
$80,000 For Bay State 
Community Services 




BAY SIAIK COMMUNITY Services recently hosted the second annual Best of Bay State - 
Ni^ht of Comedy event at the (franite Links (>olf Club in Quincy. The event raised more than 
$S(),(KN) with the help of special guest comedian, Lenny Clarke (left). All proceeds benefit Bay 
State Community Services in its ongoing efforts to provide programming for adults and chil- 
dren in need of s(M.-ial, mental health, addiction and correctional services. With Clarke are Cintia 
Del'ina. Murv Jane Tilden and Lena DePina. 



Senior Scrabble Every Monday 



The All New 



school fj/miis'w 

AIIAgfs. All levels All Musi( 



located 10 min. from (Mnqr Ctnter 

Give the Gift 
Of Music! 

Grand Re-Opening Season! 

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Elderly devotees of the 
game "Scrabble" meet every 
Monday from 12 to 3:30 
p.m. at the Dawes House on 



Quincy Shore Drive at the 
comer of Channing Street. 

Beginners are welcome. 

For more information, 
call 617-376-1506. 



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now in Braintree. 

Come in and receive a FREE CUT 
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service by Michelle Marie. 
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Offer valid thwugh Jan 31, 2008 

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671 Washington St.3raintree, Ma 02184 

www.michelle-marie.com 



u 




SPECIAL GUEST at the recent Bay State Community Services Best of Bay State - Night of 
Comedy was former Red Sox star pitcher Jim Lonborg (center) of Scituate. Joining the 1967 
American League Cy Young Award Winner are (from left) Paul and Karen DiMaura of Boston, 
Phyllis Godwin, owner of Granite City Electric of Quincy; and Dolly DiPesa of DiPesa and 
Company of Quincy. 




OTHER GUESTS at the recent Bay State Community Services Best of Bay State - Night of 
Comedy were (from left) William Kelley, member of the Bay State Community Services Board 
of Directors and former president of Hancock Bank; Kenneth Ibrabelli, executive director of 
Bay State Community Services; Gail Bork, staff and community development coordinator at 
Bay State Community Services; and Paul Bork, partner at Foley Hoag, LLP. 

Roundtable Discussions 
At Beechwood Center 



The Senior Center at 
Beechwood on the Bay, 440 
East Squantum St., will host 
four roundtable discussions 
on January Fridays beginning 
Jan. 4 when the topic will be 
"Stress and Blood Pressure 
Management." 

Also scheduled are: 
"Long-Distance 
Grandparenting,"onJan. 11; 



"Coping with Loss and Major 
Life Changes" on Jan. 1 8 and 
"Diet and Nutrition Tips" on 
Jan. 25. 

There are light 
refreshments at all sessions 
which are open to all at no 
cost. 

Beechwood's Senior 



Center Coordinator Mary ann 
Mahony who organizes the 
roundtable meetings said that 
past discussions have been 
well attended. The program 
began in November. 

For more information, 
617-471-5712. 



Free Movie For Seniors 



COLLEGE NflRRORS 

by Eglomisc • 7-10 Day Delivery 
IM Sm, Ftmnqt Part t Baky MkTon ab« 



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lJt)OH>incockSt. Quiiuvbi; 472 5667 



The Council on Aging 
will show the movie of the 
month free to seniors on the 
third Thursday of every 
month at the River Bay Club, 



99 Brackett St. I 

The movie is provided by 
West Coast Video at no 
charge. Refreshments will be 
provided. Call Aim at 617- 
376-1506 to reserve a seat. 









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SCCIAI- 



John Hancock Birthday 

Plunge To Support 
Interfaith Social Services 



The Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission will 
host its second annual John 
Hancock Birthday Plunge 
Saturday, Jan. 19 at noon at 
Mound Street Beach in 
Quincy Point. 

The event will support 
Interfaith Social Services 
which has been helping 
families in need on the South 
Shore for more than 60 
years. 

"Plungers" can help by 



soliciting sponsors. Forms 
are available by contacting 
Ward 1 Councillor Leo Kelly 
at 617-773-1534 or event 
coordinator Chickie 

Abdallah at 617-479-2142. 

Prizes will be awarded for 
the highest amount of 
pledges, and for most un- 
usual "get-ups!" 

For more information 
about Interfaith Social Ser- 
vices, visit 
www. inter faithsocial 
services.org. 




MR. and MRS. BARTOLO PANTO 

Mr., Mrs. Bartolo Panto 
Celebrate 50th Annivesrsary 



Volunteers Needed 
At Beechwood Center 



Volunteers are needed for 
almost every program at 
Beechwood Community Life 
Center, 440 East Squantum 
St., according to Maryann 
Mahony who helps organize 
many of the center's events. 
The center serves all ages. 

"First time visitors are 
always surprised to see our 
wide range of programs and 
activities! Our wonderful 
volunteers make it possible," 
said Mahony. "Some 
volunteers work one day a 
week. Others more. SoiJlie 
work two hours a visit. 
Others, more." 

"We are a private, 
charitable organization and 
have a very small budget for 
our Senior Center. That' s the 
bad news," said Mahony who 
added, "The good news is 
that wonderful caring folk 
help us as volunteers." 

"Volunteers are always 
needed to help with inter- 
generational activities at 
Beechwood On The Bay," 



said Mahony. "In response 
to a recent article in The 
Quincy Sun, we have 
received wonderful inquiries 
and offers for volunteer 
time." 

Volunteers are needed 
now for nine programs: 1, 
Arts & Crafts; 2, Lunch 
Program; 3, Outdoor 
Recreation; 4, Knitting and 
Crocheting Instruction; 5, 
The 'Rocking Nannies' 
Program (help in the infant 
room); 6, Children' s Outdoor 
Classrooms; 7 Handyman 
tasks; 8, New Chess Club; 9, 
February Fundraiser. 

"We have welcomed 
increasing numbers of senior 
participants in recent months 
and have special volunteer 
openings in our Senior 
Program," said Mahony, 

Mahony has scheduled a 
volunteer lunch orientation 
program on Wednesday, Jan. 
30. For more information, 
call 617-472-5712. 



Bartolo (Buddy) and Jean 
Panto of Quincy, were guests 
of honor recently at a sur- 
prise 50th wedding anniver- 
sary party given by their chil- 
dren. 

The couple were married 
Oct. 27, 1957 at St. Joseph's 
Church in Roxbury. Mrs. 
Panto is the former Jean 
Thebado. 

Mr. Panto is a retired 



heavy equipment operator 
from Union Local 4. 

The Pantos children are: 
Donna Lawrence and her 
husband Mike of Marshfield, 
Debbie Connors and her hus- 
band Paul of Weymouth, and 
Michael Panto and his wife 
Wendy of Brockton. 

The couple also have nine 
grandchildren and one great- 
granddaughter. 



Woodward School 
Honor Roll Correction 

The names of four Quincy graders at the school and 

smdents were inadvertently residents of Quincy, received 

omitted from The Woodward honors. 

School first quarter honor They are: 

roll that was published in the Niamh O'Connor, Emily 

Dec. 27th issue of The Rines, Amanda Rowan and 

Quincy Sun. Sarah Saccoach. 

The students, all seventh The Sun regrets the error. 

Mr., Mrs. Christopher Murphy 
Parents Of Daughter 



ARBELLA INSURANCE group, located in Quincy was a pre- 
senting sponsor for the 10th annual "Feed the Hungry" 
fundraiser recently held at Lombardo's Function Facility in 
Randfriph. The benefit raised money for Quincy-based Inter- 
faith Social Services, whose numerous programs and services 
liave helped those in need throughout the South Shore since 
1947. Laura Stracco (left) executive director of Interfaith so- 
cial Services, receives a checli for $10,000 from Beverly Tangvili, 
director of Charitable Giving for Arbella Charitable Founda- 
tion. Last year, ISS's Pantry Shelf, one of the agency's largest 
programs, served more than 11,000 people throughout the South 
Shore, including more than 3,400 children. 

Mr., Mrs. Eric Leuchte 
Parents Of Daughter 

Courtney and Eric Weymouth. 
Leuchte of No. Weymouth Grandparents are Sherry 

are parents of a daughter and Joseph Cotter of 

Emery Brianna bom Nov. 5 Scituate, and Carolyn and 

at South Shore Hospital, Joseph Leuchte of Quincy 



Christopher and 

Katherine Murphy of 
Quincy, are parents of a 
daughter Lauren Katherine 
bom Nov. 24 at Brigham & 
Women's Hosptial, Boston. 

She joins brothers Joseph 
and Thomas 

Grandparents are Jean 
and Charles Murphy, and 
Jayne and John E. Doherty, 



Jr., all of Quincy. 



UtHe Willows Preschool & Daycare 

Q /--x Educational Classes 

• pj^ FuII/PT - Low Ratios 

^ Certified/ Licensed Teaching Staff 




New ToAdler Program 



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617-773-6173 

KMEYOIccreditcd 

We accept Scholarships & Voches 



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Est. 1972 by Russell Affsa 




Y ii W S 

STYLE 

Whatever Your Style 

We Can Do It. 

We now have later hours 



Call for your appointment today. for your convenience 




JEWELRY 



I^QlSOn Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 617-786-7942 

January Birthstone is Garnet - Handicapped Accessible 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unity Candles 



RKI.I(;i()l s 
AKTK 1.1 S 



Rosary Beads 



BOOKS •(ilUS 

'misk .HiBi.i;s: 



25 BEALE STREET 
Mon - Sat 9:30ain - 6:30pin 



WOLLASTON 

(617) 471-0990 




SOCIAL CENTER 



SONS OF ITALY 

Social Center 

1 20 Quarry Street, Quincy 
Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs. 
Call about our Wedding Packages... 
617-472-5900 www.Quincy.SOI.com 



FUNCTION HALL 



THE TIRRELL ROOM 

QUINCY ELKS 

As advertised in New England Bride 

www.thetirrellroom.com 

Weddings * Banquets * Showers * Birthdays * All Occasions 
254 Quany St. Quincy 617-847-6149 



FLORISTS 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 

761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

617-773-7620 



FUNCTION HALL 



ADAMS 
HEIGHTS 

All Occasions 

63 Bower Rd., 

Quincy 

617-773-4750 



This Space 
Available 

To Advertise 
Here, Call 

617-471-3100 



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iofrr^T 



siv^ ■Hnf^x.-J'smih.^. 






BY MARIE D'OLIMPIO 




Brian's Chicken, Bacon Marsala 



It was our annual Christmas Eve dinner at 
our granddaughter Jennifer and husband 
Michael's house. They are both excellent 
cooks. Their menu seemed endless from sea- 
food casserole to grilled tenderloin roasts, - a 
spectacular buffet. 

As I mingled with the guests, one was a 
chef named Brian who works on Cape Cod. 
We began talking about what else, food? 

He told me about one of his own creations. 
Chicken marsala like you've never had it. 
Today's recipe can be expanded depending 
on how many you are feeding. 

Brian's Chicken, Bacon, 
Brown Sugar Marsala 
4 pieces of chicken breast (pounded until 
thin) 

8 slices of bacon 
1/2 cup brown sugar 
1/4 cup marsala wine 
2 cloves garlic 



2-3 tablespoons olive oil 

1/2 pound fresh mushrooms (cut) 

1 cup chicken stock 

First off, coat each bacon strip with brown 
sugar. Place the bacon strips on a cookie 
sheet in a 350 degree oven until the bacon is 
almost done and the sugar is caramelized 
(about 10 minutes). Remove and set aside. 

While this is cooking, prepare the chicken 
marsala by flouring the chicken. In hot oil, 
saute the garlic add the mushrooms and the 
chicken and then the wine. Add the chicken 
stock, blending it all together. When the 
chicken is almost done, remove from the pan 
and set aside. 

Now wrap each piece of chicken with the 
bacon. Place back in the pan and slowly cook 
spooning the mixture over the top. You don't 
have to turn the chicken. Cook until done and 
serve. It is so different and worth the extra 
effort. 



Prescriptions, Supplements 
Topic At Beechwood Center 



Quincy pharmacist 
Bonnie Seeley will discuss 
"Prescriptions and 

Supplements — Common 
Mistakes'" Wednesday, Jan. 
y, at the monthly Current 
Event Breakfast meeting at 



Beechwood Community Life 
Center, 440 East Squantum 
St. 

Seeley, owner of 
Blackwood Pharmacy, is 
well known among seniors 
and a very popular speaker at 



ARE ALCOHOL OR DRUGS CAUSING 
PROBLEMS IN YOUR FAMILY? 

The FAMILY PROJECT may help. 

The Family Project is a study being done by 

Harvard Medical School researchers at Bay State 

Community Services in Quincy &Weymouth. The 

study offers free counseling to individuals with 

alcohol or drug problems. To qualify, you must: 

* Have a current alcohol or drug 
problem 

* Currently live with a family 
member (parent, sibling, adult child) 

* Have a family member without a 
current alcohol or drug problem 

For more information, call 617-694-2602 



Beechwood, according to 
Beechwood's Senior 
Coordinator Maryann 
Mahony who said the center' s 
Senior Advisory Council 
asked Seeley to speak. 

All Quincy seniors are 
invited to attend the 
breakfast, which begins at 
9a.m. Reservations are 
required and there is a 
suggested donation of $3. 

For more information, call 
617-471-5712. 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 

earn extra money by 

txiilding a Quincy Sun 

home delivery route. 

Telephone 

617-471-3100 



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mmfedfivm Quinqf 



At Linden Ponds, your 100% Refundable Entrance Deposit* gets you 
into a spacious, maintenance-free apartment home. The money from the 
sale of your house can make your retirement possible A move to Linden 
Ponds is the best financial decision you can make. 

CaU 781-337-2255 today for your 
tree Infonnation Kit 



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HAPPY lOOTH BIRTHDAY - Nieces^iephews and great nieces gather around Virginia 
Waldron of Quincy as slie celebrates lier lOOtli birtliday. Top row (from left) are: Monique 
Hubbard, Marie (Waldron) Fallon, Bob Fallon, Francis Waldron, Fr. Walter Waldron, Denise 
(Waldron) PaitMiy, Jack Waldron; Bottom Row (L to R): Michelle Sullivan, Yirgmia Waldron, 
Cheryl FaUon. 

Virginia Waldron Celebrates 100th Birthday 



Virginia "Gia" Waldron, 
of Quincy, celebrated her 
100th birthday Monday in 
the company of more than 
four generations of fmaily 
and friends who marked 
the centennial milestone at 
a celebration at the 
Sheraton Tara in Braintree. 

Born Virginia Mary 
Waldron, she grew up in 
Jamaica Plain with her 
older brother Walter, now 
deceased. When Virginia 
turned 17 years old, her 
mother gave birth to an- 
other daughter, Muriel 
(Waldron) Sweeney, with 
whom Virginia currently 
resides and has lived with 
in Quincy for more than 40 
years. 

At an early age, Virginia 
developed an affinity for 
numbers, and subsequently 
became an accountant at a 
time when that position 
was considered "off-lim- 
its" to women. For more 
than 50 years, Virginia 
worked as an accountant 
for her brother. In fact, up 
until she reached age 97, 
Virginia did her own an- 
nual income taxes as well 
as those of several family 
members. 



She also worked as a con- 
sultant to Gov. Paul Dever 
(D), alongside her brother 
Walter — former chairman of 
the MTA (now Massachu- 
setts Bay Transportation Au- 
thority) — and sister Muriel 
in the 1950s. 

While she never married, 
Virginia has a large extended 
family, including seven 
nieces and nephews: the 
Rev. Walter J. Waldron, pas- 
tor of St. Patrick's Church in 
Roxbury; John "Jack" 
Waldron, former New York 
Titans defensive back, re- 
tired Boston Public School 
teacher and Dedham resi- 
dent; Francis Waldron, resi- 
dent of the Wrentham State 
School; Marie (Waldron) 
Fallon of Barrington, 111.; 
Denise (Waldron) Parody of 
Sharon, Mass.; Jean 
Sweeney of Braintree, 
Mass.; and John Sweeney, 
who was tragically killed in 
a car accident in 1982. 

Virginia is also loved by 
her eight great-nieces and 
nephews, two great grand- 
nieces and a great grand- 
nephew, all of whom reside 
in either the Boston area or 
the suburbs of Chicago, 111. 
She has traveled to be there 



for many of their mile- 
stones, including First 
Communions, high school 
and college graduations, 
and weddings. Virginia 
has traveled extensively 
throughout the world, in- 
cluding Europe and South 
America, taking her great 
nieces along on many of 
these adventures. 

Fondly revered as the 
"cornerstone" of the 
Waldron clan, Virginia has 
always exemplified a 
steadfast devotion to her 
family and the Roman 
Catholic Church. 

Throughout her hfetime, 
\%ginia has extended her 
financial generosity to per- 
sonal charities, the Church 
and her family. In return, 
she's been blessed with a 
zest for hfe, a hearty sense 
of humor and an incredibly 
sharp memory. 

Virginia attributes her 
longevity to "Eating all the 
foods that I shouldn't and 
keeping up with my vora- 
cious appetite for read- 
mg. 

Sage advice from a 
woman who takes just one 
prescription medication a 
day. 




* A* per Uw KedMenee and Can A^waent 



Exceptional service. 



Strong advocacy. 



Dedication to clients. 



For all your legal needs. 
Christine Cedrone Logan & Associates, P.C. 

21 McGrath Highway, Suite 306 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Tel: (617) 934-0709 
Fax: (617) 328-0689 

e-mail: clogaB@ccdroBcUw.com 

ALL major credit CARDS ACCEPTED 



'ii;Li;«;^ii:i^^ 



Grant Award Applications Available 

Wanted: Creative Ideas 
For Using, Protecting Beaches 



Save the Harbor/Save the 
Bay has announced that the 
Better Beaches Grant 
Program is accepting 
applications for $500 to 
$5000 grant awards for 
creative ideas for using and 
protecting pubhc beaches in 
Quincy and the region. 

The grant program funded 
by The Boston Foundation is 
designed to stimulate new 
ideas for activity on 
Massachusetts public 
beaches from Nahant to 
Quincy to Hull. Applications 
are due Friday, Feb. 1 . Award 
decisions will be made by 
the end of February. 

Paul Grogan, President 
and CEO of The Boston 
Foundation, said he expects 
exciting results through the 
grant program's focus on 
pubhc beaches. 

"These beaches represent 



an enormous opportunity for 
all Bostonians and regional 
residents alike," Grogan said, 
adding, "We are deUghted to 
be able to support Save the 
Harbor/Save the Bay and the 
work of the Metropolitan 
Beaches Conmiission." 

Program ideas could 
include, but are not hmited 
to, swimming lessons, 
outdoor concerts, and kite 
festivals, sandcastle 

competitions or farmers' 
markets. 

"The two-page 

application is simple and can 
be found online at 
www.savetheharbor.org,'' 
said Colby Morrissey of Save 
the Harbor/Save the Bay. 

"At Save the Harbor/Save 
the Bay, we believe the best 
way to save the harbor is to 
share it," said Patricia Foley, 
president of Save the Harbor. 
"We are looking for great 



new ways to share these 
important resources with the 
pubhc." 

Requests can range from 
$500 to $5,000. Non-profit 
organizations, community 
groups, and less formal 
'friends' or neighborhood 
groups from Lynn, Nahant, 
Revere, Winthrop, East 
Boston, South Boston, 
Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull 
are ehgible for funding. 

Applicants are invited to 
attend a workshop scheduled 
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., 
Thursday, Jan. 10, at Save 
the Harbor/Save the Bay, 2 1 2 
Northern Av., Suite 304W, 
Boston. 

Applicants interested in 
attending the workshop 
should notify Colby 
Morrissey at 617-451-2860. 
For more information, call 
Morrissey or visit the website 
listed above. 




YOUNGSTERS ENJOY some of the games at Edaville Railroad during Quincy Credit Union's 
annual Scottie Saver Holiday Party. The event also featured a visit with Santa and a ride on the 
amusement park's famous train to view the holiday lights and decorations. 

QCU Scottie Savers Enjoy Holiday 
Celebration At Edaville Railroad 



As a thank you to their 
youngest Members, Quincy 
Credit Union hosted their 
annual Scottie Saver HoUday 
Party recently at Edaville 
USA located in South 
Carver. 

Despite the bitter cold, 
over 400 guests joined QCU 



to kick off the holiday sea- 
son in traditional New En- 
gland style. 

The party included a com- 
plimentary visit and photo 
with Santa, a free hot choco- 
late and the famous train ride 
through the park to view the 
many holiday lights and 



decorations. 

Quincy Credit Union cur- 
rently serves over 22,000 
Members. Credit Union 
Membership is available to 
those who live or work in 
Norfolk and Plymouth 
Counties, Dorchester and 
any family Member. 



Healing Tree Center Open House Saturday 



The Healing Tree Yoga 
and Wellness Center, 605 
Hancock St., Quincy Center, 
will celebrate the New Year 
with an "Open House Event" 
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



Saturday, Jan. 5. Individuals 
and famiUes are welcome. 

In addition to raffles, light 
snacks and refreshments, 
there will be complimentary 
chair massages and free 



classes available all day for 
new clients. The staff plan to 
showcase all the services 
available at the center. 

For more information, call 
617-770-4800. 




QyOii a/ye c<yrala//u cfiA>i//e<l lo a//<'M</ 
Qj/te Cynaifgi4/yalwn oi 

33rd Qyf{<j(/ijor 
ofm^^ K^itu of ^dUif/nrAi 

and ^4U9tcy Q/moo/ ^oym/m^^^ Q Me/z^we^s 
OyHofuui/Uj Q^jki'^tuar^u 7, '/i008 

^4J'mou QyMwim^lt ir/oaUroom 




/deo^ 




Khang Nguyen, M.D., Announces 
Hilton Hospital Office Location 

Khang Nguyen, M.D., a member of Milton Hospital's Community 
Physician Associates primary care practice, is now seeing patients at 
a second office, located at Milton Hospital. Board-certified in internal 
medicine. Dr. Nguyen received his doctorate of medicine at Dartmouth 
Medical School, Hanover, NH, and completed his residency at George 
Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC. Dr. Nguyen 
speaks fluent Vietnamese. 

For expert care, close to home, schedule your appointment today with: 

Milton Hospital Community Physician Associates 

199 Reedsdale Road, Milton MA | 617-698-6980 

Randolph Medical Associates 

32 South Main Street, Randolph, MA | 781-963-3082 



in 



MILTON 
HOSPITAL 



AH AFFIUUTC OF 

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 



The care you want. Close to home. 
199 Reedsdale Roa^l ■ Milton, MA 02186 ■ 617 696-4600 



wm^m 



t^ 10 'ifbi'^fUSai''lmMMk 11iiind«y,''iiiniiary X 2008 



The Rise Of Plan A And Fall Of Plan E 



(Cont'd From Page 2) 

form of govenunent. Coun- 
cillor Amelio Delia Chiesa 
was re-elected mayor and 
Councillor Edna B. Austin 
was re-elected vice-chair- 
man of the council. 

In April 1956. City Man- 
ager Donald Blatt resigned 
his position as city manager 
and Edward T. Lewis, a 31 
year city employee, was 
elected to serve the final 20 
months of the city manager 
form of government. 
PLAN A PHASE TWO 
Plan A 1958-2008 

vStarting with the admin- 
istration of Mayor Amelio 
Delia Chiesa who served 
four two year terms (1958- 
1965). eight mayors have 
served during the past 50 
years. 

Mayor Delia Chiesa was 
folU»wed by James R. 
Mclntyre (1966-1971), 
W;iltei J. Hannon (1972- 
h>75), .loseph J. LaRaia 
( 1976 1977). Arthur H. 
Tobm ( IW7K-I9SI) l-rancis 
.X. McCauley (I9K2-I989). 
lames A. Sheets (l9iX)-2(K)l) 
and most recently. William J. 
Phe!an(2(K)2-2()()7) 

Each of the above indi- 
viduals made a positive im- 
pact on the city during their 
tenure in the mayor's office. 

Mayor Delia Chiesa was 



a pioneer in the privatization 
of certain city services. Delia 
Chiesa put the collection of 
rubbish and garbage out on 
contract. Delia Chiesa also 
championed the develop- 
ment of the off-street pair- 
ing program in downtown 
Quincy. 

Mayor James R. 
Mclntyre used his dual rose 
as mayor and state senator to 
bring the MBTA Red Line to 
Quincy on very favorable fi- 
nancial terms to the city. 
Mayor Mclntyre 's insistence 
that the MBTA locate a sta- 
tion in North Quincy led to 
the development of the State 
Street South Complex which 
today is one of Quincy's 
largest employers and tax- 
payers. 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon 
who followed Mclntyre to 
the mayor's office continued 
to work to bring additional 
business development to the 
Montclair area. His then con- 
troversial decision to com- 
bine the rubbi.sh and garbage 
pickups back in 1974 has 
worked well and has .saved 
the tiixpayers millions of dol- 
lars of refuse removal costs 
over the years. 

Mayor Joseph J. LaRaia, 
in his single term of office, 
used an "Anti-Recession" 
grant of several million dol- 



lars to start the planning for 
a much needed addition to 
Quincy City Hall. The 
project which has been dis- 
cussed since the 1920's was 
completed during the admin- 
istration of LaRaia's succes- 
sor Mayor Tobin. 

During the administration 
of Arthur H. Tobin, the con- 
struction of the city hall ad- 
dition was completed and 
opened for business. The 
construction of Quincy Cen- 
ter Plaza, also known as the 
Stop & Shop Building was 
constructed. The ten story 
building brought about 1000 
people to work in and patron- 
ize downtown Quincy stores, 
banks and restaurants. 
Mayor Tobin also filed leg- 
islation that placed both 
Quincy Hospital and Quincy 
College on self-sustaining 
Enterprise Accounts. Hospi- 
tal Corporation of America 
was also hired to provide 
experienced professional 
management of the hospital. 

During the eight year ad- 
ministration of Mayor 
Francis X. McCauley the 
long-awaited Burgin Park- 
way extension was com- 
pleted. This period saw the 
construction of Presidents 
Place on the site of the 
former Bargain Center. The 
city obtained a state grant of 




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$780,000 to provide infra- 
structure improvements at 
the site. The city, also in 1 985 
obtained a state grant of 
$1,040,000 to build a 124 
space addition to the Ross 
Parking Garage. In addition, 
a $60.2 million dollar addi- 
tion and renovation of the 
Quincy Hospital, now 
Quincy Medical Center, was 
completed. 

Mayor James A. Sheets, 
who tenure as Plan A mayor 
(6 terms between January 
1 990 and January 2002,) was 
the longest in the city's his- 
tory, instituted the "Cleaner, 
Greener Quincy" concept 
where the first Saturday in 
May each year hosts a city- 
wide clean-up where city 
workers and citizen volun- 
teers complete an intensive 
refuse pickup throughout the 
city. This program has been 
continued by Mayor Phelan. 
Mayor Sheets also presided 
over the planning and con- 
stmction of an addition to the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary. 

The eighth mayor to serve 
in the 50 year period is Wil- 
liam J. Phelan. Mayor Phelan 
won public attention with his 
stand in opposition to the 
construction of the new 
Quincy High School on a 
toxic waste dump on Quincy 
Avenue. Anew Quincy High 
School facility is rising on 
the site of the present build- 
ing and the Quincy Voca- 
tional Technical School fa- 
cility. A long-standing dis- 
agreement over funds owed 
by Quincy College to the city 
of Quincy was settled during 
Mayor Phelan's tenure. 
Mayor Phelan, as chairman 
of the school committee, in- 
stituted a full-day kindergar- 
ten program in the school 



system. 

The Plan A "strong 
mayor" form of city govern- 
ment has worked well over 
the past 50 years. The 
mayor's ability to ^point his 
department heads and staff 
without confirmation by the 
council, along with his sole 
authority to initiate city 
spending, has given mayors 
strong powers. 

However, with this broad 
authority comes accountabil- 
ity. History shows that when 
the public perceives that 
things are not going well in 
the city, it is the mayor, not 
the city council and school 
committee who are held ac- 
countable. 

Hence, it is not surprising 
that of the eight mayors who 
have served during the past 
50 years, four mayors (50% 
of the total) have failed re- 
election. 

Walter Hannon (1975), 
Joseph J. LaRaia (1977), 
James A. Sheets (2001) and 
our present mayor William J. 
Phelan (2007), went down to 
defeat by aggressive chal- 
lengers who strongly criti- 
cized the mayor's record in 
office. 

Compare the mayors' re- 
election records with that of 
the city councillor's re-elec- 
tions. Since 1961, only three 
incumbent councilors-at- 
large seeking re-election 
have been defeated, while at 
the ward level, only eight in- 
cumbents failed re-election. 
Incumbents running for re- 
election to the city council 
are winners between 93% 
and 94% of the time. 
ELECTION 2007 

The 2007 election was 
one of the most interesting in 
many years. It featured an 
incumbent (Mayor William 




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Irene Belsky, MD 
Shannon Shevock, MD 
Kristen Penney, FNP 
Jenn^r Sabir, MD 
Linda Sdiofield, RN 
Denise Marsters, RN 



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• • Since 1979 -JCAHOAccredked 

For an appointment^ please call: 

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J. Phelan) who came to the 
mayor's office in 2(X)1, on 
the strength of a 1 7 vote mar- 
gin. Mayor Phelan was the 
Hrst individual elected under 
Plan A without serving on the 
city council since Gustave 
Bates turned the trick in 
1922. 

Phelan's sole experience 
in elective office was a two 
year stint on the school com- 
mittee. Mayor Rielan's op- 
position, Thomas P. Koch 
had lost races for ward six 
councillor in 1985, councilor 
at large in 1987, and county 
treasurer in 2(X)2. 

However, the mayor elect 
had almost 20 years experi- 
ence serving in appointive 
offices under three mayors, 
Frank McCauly, Jim Sheets 
and Bill Phelan. 

During his six years as 
mayor. Bill Phelan came 
across to the many people 
with whom he interacted as 
an arrogant, combative chief 
executive. He became some- 
thing that every politician 
wants to avoid. 

He became controversial, 
you either loved the mayor 
or disliked him intensely. 
Mayor Phelan had a credit- 
able six year tenure as the 
city's chief executive but his 
accomplishments were sub- 
merged and his volatile per- 
sonality emerged as a major 
issue in the campaign. 

Mayor-elect Tom Koch 
joins a number of other 
Quincy mayors who had lost 
prior elections before reach- 
ing the mayor's office. Tho- 
mas J. McGrath, mayor of 
Quincy 1927-1932, lost his 
first four attempts to win a 
city council seat before he 
finally won election to the 
council in 1914. McGrath, 
who left school after com- 
pleting the 8th grade, was the 
first individual to serve three 
two year terms as Plan A 
mayor. 

Amelio Delia Chiesa also 
lost his first three attempts to 
win a councilor at large seat 
before being elected ward 
three councilor in 1943. 
Delia Chiesa went on to win 
a total of 19 elections before 
retiring from public life in 
January, 1969. 

Were mistakes made 'by 
our elected officials over the 
years? You bet! As the say- 
ing goes, that's why they put 
erasers on pencils. Generally 
speaking, however, the city 
has been well-govemed over 
the years. 

I've known Mayor-elect 
Tom Koch over the years, in 
fact, I appointed him to his 
first position in city govern- 
ment, that of Executive Di- 
rector of the Council on Ag- 
ing. In recent years he has 
skiMiUy managed one of the 
city's largest departments, 
that of Park, Forestry and 
Cemetery Departments. 

I am confident that Tom 
will do an equally good job 
as our city's mayor. I wish 
him well. 



Thursday, January 3, 2008 Tlft« Qiiinoar Sua Page 11 



Phelan Leaving 'Extremely Proud' Of Accomplishments 



Vjl 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

tematic and financially pru- 
dent manner. The purchase 
of the MUNIS financial soft- 
ware system and training of 
every single city employee 
on the new system allowed 
department managers to bet- 
ter implement budgets and 
auditors to better track and 
control our financial deal- 
ings. The acquisition of the 
Vision appraisal system Fi- 
nally ensured equity in our 
property assessments and 
fair and balanced taxation 
throughout the city. 

And now we sit on the 
cusp of a potential economic 
boom for our city. The future 
of our city rests heavily on 
the success of our efforts to 
revitalize our downtown. 
Quincy is a densely settled 
city that must rely on loca- 
tions such as our downtown, 
the Crown Colony Office 
Park, and the Fore River 
Shipyard property for future 
development. Our taxpayers 
need these properties to 
reach their development po- 
tential to benefit from the 
potential tax revenues that 
could be generated from all 
three sites. 

Our downtown is primed 
for major investment. Re- 
zoning the downtown let in- 
vestors know we are serious 
about our future. The new 
Quincy Center Concourse 
will provide vital transporta- 
., tion infrastructure to spur 
investment. The adoption of 
the District Improvement Fi- 
nancing Plan and Urban Re- 
newal Plan provide a fund- 
ing mechanism to turn plans 
into reality. We have laid the 
groundwork for the much- 
anticipated redevelopment of 
Downtown Quincy. 



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And a new $20 million 
ramp project at Crown 
Colony will encourage in- 
vestment and alleviate traf- 
fic congestion in South 
Quincy. A new office build- 
ing spells relief for our resi- 
dential taxpayers and 1 
strongly hope that this ramp 
project results in significant 
private investment through- 
out the adjacent area. 

But if I am remembered 
for only one thing, I would 
hope it to be the quality of 
the Quincy Public Schools. 
There is nothing more cen- 
tral to thee quality of a com- 
munity than the quality of its 
school system. It drives ev- 
erything else in a community 
and we have made tremen- 
dous strides in the Quincy 
Public Schools. 

I am proud of what the 
School Committee, adminis- 
tration, and I have been able 
to accompUsh. The imple- 
mentation of all-day kinder- 
garten will create lasting im- 
provements in the education 
of all our young people. We 
are seeing our smallest class- 
sizes in years. We have an 
early intervention literacy 
program that is touted as a 
model by the State's Depart- 
ment of Education. 

I am proud that we are 
building a new Quincy High 
School in the right location, 
our downtown. We are build- 



ing the school in a place ac- 
cessible to children from 
Quincy Point, South Quincy, 
Quincy Center, Merrymount, 
Adams Shore, Germantown, 
and Hough's Neck. Most 
importantly, we are not 
building the new school on 
the dumpsite from the Fore 
River Shipyard. I want to 
thank all of the parents and 
students that joined with me 
in the historic fight to block 
that horrendous plan. 

As I leave office, I hope 
to leave behind a better qual- 
ity of life and stronger local 
environment. I am proud to 
have overseen the largest 
open space acquisition and 
park renovation effort in City 
history, with revenue raised 
from the city's hotel/motel 
tax and the Community Pres- 
ervation Fund. In the past six 
years we have acquired the 
bird sanctuary at Lx)t 23, the 
Bayswater Boatyard in 
Hough's Neck, the Cobble- 
stone property at 271 Sea 
Street, the Joyce property in 
West Quincy, the Avalon 
property in Quincy Point and 
the Souther Tide Mill prop- 
erty along Town River. 
These properties will protect 
our local environment, pre- 
vent additional development, 
and provide our residents 
with a place to put the bustle 
and jar of the city far away. 

Our efforts to renovate 



our park system have led to 
a new FieldTurf surface at 
Veterans' Stadium, the city's 
first female sports complex 
at Mitchell/McCoy Field, the 
creation of a new soccer field 
in Germantown, and im- 
provements to all of our 
neighborhood beaches. New 
sand and benches were 
added to ten municipal 
beaches for the first time in 
decades. I also added street- 
tree planting in the munici- 
pal budget for the first time 
in memory. 

Quincy is the first com- 
munity to take advantage of 
new State law and imple- 
ment a new energy savings 
initiative at more than 40 
municipal buildings. Our 
energy efficiency efforts are 
the equivalent of planting 
825 acres of new trees or re- 
moving 440 cars from the 
road. Our new Quincy High 
School will be a "green" 
building and we have 
adopted procurement poli- 
cies that are environmentally 
friendly. 

In our neighboriioods we 
have made significant im- 
provements including the 
construction of a beautiful, 
new Germantown Neighbor- 
hood Center at the site of the 
former Saint Boniface 
Church. We have built a new 
neighborhood center in 
North Quincy and made im- 



provement to the Fore River 
Clubhouse in Quincy Point. 

I have created the position 
of Code Enforcement Officer 
to address quahty of life is- 
sues in our neighborhoods 
and the Illegal Rooming 
House Task Force has done 
a great job tackling this det- 
rimental and dangerous is- 
sue. 

In the area of public 
safety, we have improved 
dramatically since the tragic 
events of 9/11. Our police, 
fire, health and emergency 
management personnel are 
better trained and better 
equipped than anytime in 
history. 

We have added five new 
fire engines and made repairs 
to all of our fire stations. We 
have new interoperable ra- 
dios for all police and fire 
personnel and all first-re- 
sponders have been uni- 
formly trained in national 
incident management and 
response techniques. 

I take pride in the diver- 
sity of the staff that I have 
hired. The Phelan adminis- 
tration has more women in 
leadership positions than any 
administration in City his- 
tory. I hired Asian-language 
specific and gender-specific 
classes for our police depart- 
ment to ensure better repre- 
sentation. We have added 
multi-lingual personnel in 



key departments that inter- 
face with our diverse popu- 
lation. 

More than anything else, 
I leave office with many new 
friends and an appreciation 
for the spirit that embodies 
our great city. 1 have seen 
how many volunteers and 
community-spirited people 
add to our city's greamess. 
Whether it is in youth sports, 
meals programs, Cleaner- 
Greener Quincy, relief for 
Hurricane Katrina victims in 
Louisiana, elderly programs, 
city events, or boards and 
commissions, the residents 
of our great city have repeat- 
edly stepped-up in the inter- 
est of helping others. 

That charity, that commu- 
nity spirit exhibited by thou- 
sands of people is what I will 
remember most from my 
time in office. For even with 
all of Quincy's notable his- 
tory and our beautiful natu- 
ral resources, Quincy's 
greatness lies within the 
spirit of the people that call 
this wonderful city their 
home. 

I wish Tom Koch and his 
administration the best of 
luck in guiding our great city. 

Thank you for the privi- 
lege of serving as your 
mayor. 1 wish you all a 
healthy, happy, prosperous 
New Year. 




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QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 



QUINCY POLICE STATISTICS; Dec. 21 • Dec. 28 

Total Calls fo r Service: 1^07 

Total A rrests: 19 

Total Stole n Mutc)i Vehicles: 4 

FRIDAY. DEC. 21 

BRKAKING AND ENTKRIN(;/PAST, 9:17 a.m., 158 

Winthrop Ave. Dwelling. Caller .says young male, 5'6 - 5'8" 

entered home; party fled home after being confronted. 780 

reports toot prints on rear deck. 

LARCENY, 9:47 a.m., Mc(;inn\ Service Station, 627 
Newport Ave. Past. See caller about past larceny of gas. 
Officer to look into getting money back. 

LARCENY, 11 :54 a.m., Namenson SmelofT, 43 Wiilard 
St. Cell phone stolen. 

LARCENY, 4:09 p.m., 422 (Jranite St. Trash. Some 
one throwing trash in her yard. Illegal dumping and larceny 
of a lawn ornament. 

LARCENY, 6:53 p.m., TJMaxx, 100 C.ranite St. They 
are finng employee for siealmg money from other employ- 
ees' lockers. Store to handle. 

BREAKIN(; AND EN rERIN(;/PAST, 7:43 p.m., 10 
VilluKi* Rd. Dwelling. Jewelrv and laptop known missing. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 9:39 p.m., Wollaston 
Wine Liquor, 60 Beale St. Ciroup. lighting. Report sub- 
mitted on an A&B. 

SA TURDAY. D EC. 22 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:25 a.m., C.eorge's Au- 
tomotive, 15 Liberty St. Past. Coke machine broken into. 

LAR( ENY/A r lEMPL 10:28 a.m., South Shore Co- 
operative Bank, M) Franklin St. By check. Arrest for ut- 
tering, torgeiy. ami attempted larceny by check more, along 
v\ith warr;mt. 

LAR( KNV/MOTOR \ EHICLE, L 14 p.m., 235 South 
Si. St.itos sDmcoiie known to her stole her car. Complaint 
lor UMiiii without authority. 2(M)I I'ontiac Grand Prix, color 
Lirav. 

BRKAKINC AND ENTERIN(;/PAST, 5:37 p.m., 35 
Revere Rd. i )wclling. Iront door smashed and items taken. 
Suspect anvsteil a short time later. Subjects were arrested 
lor receiving stolen property, not for the break. 

ASSAl LT AND BATTERY, 5:50 p.m., Cronin's 
Puhliek House, 2} Des Moines Rd. Just happened. Caller 
was punched in the face by male. To seek complaints in court. 
Sl' NDAY. DEC. 23 

VANDAL1SM/1»r6pERTY, 8:45 a.m., 21 EUerton Rd. 
Wuidow. 

LARCENY, 11:07 a.m., Fuji Restaurant, 1546 
HanccK'k St. Past. Caller states her purse was stolen last 
night at the above. 

LARCENY, 3:38 p.m.. Stop & Shop Supermarket, 65 
Newport Ave. Credit card. Credit card used after being sto- 
len. Credit card stolen in Quincy. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 6:38 
p.m., 227 Quincy Shore Dr. Male took TV and walked away. 
White male, 6-feet, was picked up by unknown male. 

LARCENY, 8: 12 p.m., Wal-Mart, 301 FaUs Blvd. Com- 
plaints issued. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 9:11 p.m.. Miller StUe Rd. 
Wallet, cell phone. Five youths beat youth up, took his cell 
phone and wallet. Five black males. 

MO NDAY, PE C. 24 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:24 a.m.. Centre Street 
Garage, 257 Centre St Broken window. Large rock thrown 
through front window. 

LARCENY, 9:26 a.m., 85 Copeland St GPS units/tools. 
Several German UPS unit and some assorted tools stolen. 

LARCENY, 10:57 a.m., 76 Presidents Ln. Package. 
Package delivered by UPS on Dec. 19, was not received by 
caller. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 11:22 
a.m.. Pro Spec Performance Auto, 141 Water St Busi- 
ness. 

LARgENY, 11:48 a.m., Roche Brothers Market, 101 
Falls Blvd. Money. Party stole the Salvation Army kettle. A 
witness has possible suspect description. White male. 5'8", 
last seen wearing black coat and black pants, fled on foot. 
Cammo hat and facial hair. Suspect was gone on arrival. 
Nothing taken. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1 : 10 p.m., 66 Billings Rd. 
Broken window. Youth smashed the window and ran off. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:39 p.m., 895 Quincy 
Shore Dr. Past motor vehicle. Passenger side fly window 
broken. 

BREAKING & ENTERING/PAST, 1:45 p.m., 227 
Quincy Shore Dr. Dwelling. Found more items missing. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:40 p.m., 55 Franklin 
Ave. Past motor vehicle. Rear driver's side tire slashed some- 
time overnight. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3 pan^ 109 Curtis Ave. 
Motor vehicle damage. Passenger side rear window smashed 
- happened overnight. 

LARCENY, 3:07 pjn., CVS Pharmacy, 321 Quincy 
Shore IH*. Fled. Unknown what items were taken. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 5:39 pon^ 1495 Hancock St 
Phone/wallet. Black male, 5' 10", yellow coat, strong lan- 
guage barrier fled on foot. Victim at busway. Thmsit PD 
talked to four pec^le. Stop nude at Angelina's wearing yel- 



low coat, yellow pants. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:34 p.m., City Hall, 1305 
Hancock St Past. Minorah was broken at the base; un- 
plugged it for the night. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10: 19 p.m., 6 Armory St 
Past. Front door broken. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:49 p.m., 22 
Pleasant St Dwelling. Items taken. 

TUESDAY. DEC. 25 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:16 a.m., 51 Holmes St 
Broken door. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:23 p.m., 105 Alstead St 
Past. All four tires on motor vehicle slashed. 

BREAKINC; AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:26 p.m., 51 
Holmes St. Dwelling. Back door was kicked in. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:03 p.m., 86 East 
Howard St. Past. Building was recently spraypainted. 
WEDNESDAY. DEC. 26 
BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:47 a.m., 10 
Bradford St. Dwelling. Big screen TV gone. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 7:42 a.m., 
Snug Harbor School, 330 Palmer St. Alarm. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9: 18 a.m., 1000 Southern 
Artery, South Wing. Tagging. Spray paint on the side of 
the building. Tagging underneath the footbridge under bridge 
between north and south wing. 

LARCENY, 10:59 a.m., 56 Ocean Ave. Past. Jewelry, 
money taken. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:06 p.m., Houghs Neck 
Package Store, 1183 Sea St On sign. 

LARCENY AlOTOR VEHICLE, 4:11 p.m., T^ler St 
Motor vehicle was towed by Ayers on Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. MV 
info never entered (police tow). 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:33 p.m., 138 
Glendale Rd. Past. 

LARCENY, 5:29 p.m., 135 Rice Rd. Jewelry. 
ARMED ROBBERY, 6:43 p.m., 19 Appleton St. 25 
minutes ago. Occurred near Mass Fields (Willett St.) Four 
black males held a knife to his throat, took $200 cash, and 
fled towards Hancock St. Three wearing black hooded 
sweatshirts. The black male with the knife was approx. 6' 1", 
wearing a tan zip up hoody, white baggy pants, and Timber- 
land boots. One also wearing a black baseball cap with let- 
ter "B" on it. 

THURSDAY. DEC. 27 
BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 3:01 a.m., 134 
Robertson St. Dwelling. House found with front door win- 
dow broken. Laptop taken among other things. Cash, laptop, 
and jewelry known missing. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 5:38 
a.m., Lincoln Heights Condos, 175 Centre St Business. 
Front door to building, lists as commercial property. Main 
clubhouse found broken into. Lockbox containing rent checks 
was entered. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:08 a.m., Auto Truck 
TVailer, 10 Independence Ave. Broken window. Boat parked 
in lot had windshield broken by a rock sometime ovemight. 
No susj)ect. 

LARCENY, 10:09 a.m., 291 Copeland St Check/past. 
LARCENY, 10:43 a.m., 64 Wiilard St Credit card. 
Complaint for unlawful use of a credit card over. 

LARCENY, 1:26 p.m.. Eastern Bank, 731 Hancock 

St. Past. Incident occurred on April 28, 2005 while party 

was incarcerated. Unauthorized use of ATM card for $200. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1:27 p.m., 233 

Quincy Shore Dr. Dwelling. Happened Dec. 24. 

LARCENY, 1:47 p.m., 30 Oakland Ave. By check. 
Checks cashed, over $250. Complaint for six counts each of 
larceny by check, forgery and uttering. 

LARCENY, 2:02 p.m.. Bank of America, 1400 
Hancock St Wallet. 

LARCENY, 3:43 p.m., 17 Binnacle Ln. Money via 
ATM. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:11 p.m., 93 
Presidential Dr. Dwelling. Cash missing. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 5:29 p.m., Faxon 
Commons, 1035 Southern Artery. 2000 Cadillac Deville, 
color gray. Sometime since Dec. 25. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 11:43 p.m., 20 
Hamden Cir. Dwelling. Sony TV, cash, camera and a check- 
book are known missing. 

FRIPAY. PKC. 28 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 12:04 a.m., 60 Presi- 
dential Dr. Past. Car was scheduled to be donated to Bay 
State Council of the Blind on Dec. 21 . He went to take plates 
off but car was already gone. Evidence it had been towed. 
He called Council of the Blind, they denied towing car. 1991 
BMW 5251, color red. 

LARCENY, 9:20 a.m.. Avenue Auction Sales, 80 
Myrtle St Aluminum. About 1000 pounds of aluminum was 
stolen from lot. No suspects, no surveillance cameras. 

Q 

If you have infcMmation on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quincy Police Detective Bureau at 617-745- 
5764. If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call tte 
Drug Hot-Line at 617-328-4527. You will not be required 
to identify yourself, but it cmiki help. If you wish U> mi^e 



an appointment to view the Registered Sex Offenders book, 
call Detective Cindy Walsh at 617-745-5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention Officer for 
tips or comments, my direct line is 617-745-5719. My e- 
mail address is dminton@ci.quincy.ma.us-L/. Dan Minton 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Saturday, Dec. 22, at approximately 10:30 a.m.. 
Officers John Leuchte and Brian Flaherty were dis- 
patched to the South Shore Cooperative Bank at 30 
Franklin St. for a male party trying to pass a bad check. 

Upon arrival, the offic- 
ers were directed to the 
young male who was at- 
tempting to cash a check 
from his mother for $450. 
The suspect stated he had 
cashed checks there in the 
past and didn't understand 
what the problem was. 

As Officer Flaherty ran 
the suspect through dis- 
patch for warrants, Officer 
Leuchte interviewed the 

bank manager, who stated it was true that the suspect 
had cashed checks in the past few months from his 
mother's account. 

She said conditions changed when the suspect's 
mother came into the bank two days ago to discuss how 
she could prevent her son from taking money out of her 
account. She ended up closing all her current accounts 
and reopening new ones. The bank manager said the 
suspect's mother urged them to call the police the next 
time her son tried to cash a check. 

Officer Leuchte also spoke with the bank teller who 
was familiar with the victim's account. She stated the 
suspect has been coming in for months cashing checks 
from his mother's account for various amounts, but to- 
day the signature on the check did not match his mother's 
signature, which is on file in the bank's computer. She 
stated he would only come to her to cash the checks, 
which actually turned out to be part of his downfall. 

The bank teller said the victim recently noticed her 
checks were missing and knew who was taking them. 
To make matters worse, the teller said the suspect and 
his sister were both cashing checks from their mother's 
account! 

Officer Flaherty placed the suspect under arrest after 
learning there was an active default warrant. At this point. 
Officer Leuchte informed the suspect that he was also 
being charged with uttering a forged document and forg- 
ery of the check. The suspect, a 22-year-old Weymouth 
resident, was pat frisked for weapons, placed into hand- 
cuffs and transported to the Quincy Police Station. 

For court purposes, a bank photo of the suspect in 
the bank and the check were placed into evidence. 

Nice Work! 

In this case, the mother/victim took swift and deci- 
sive action against her son to prevent further victimiza- 
tion. She went the additional step of instructing the bank 
to contact the police if he attempted to steal from his 
mother again. Although family members stealing from 
each other is not an uncommon event in police work, a 
parent taking such strong action against her son is un- 
usual - but very effective. 

The mother's actions acted as a deterrent and a pre- 
ventive measure. I'm sure the son will think twice be- 
fore trying to scam his own mother and I'm confident 
that the mother has a completely different relationship 
(if any) with her son. 

TELEMARKETING FUNDRAISERS: Although 
I recommend people hang up on telemarketing solicita- 
tions, on occasion, I hear from someone who tells me 
that they were convinced the organization soliciting 
money was doing good work and they supported their 
efforts. 

In this case, I urge donors not give credit card infor- 
mation over the telephone or allow a stranger to come 
to their home and pick up a check or cash donation. Even 
though the soUcitors may be convincing, there is no guar- 
antee the monies will go to the cause, or how much will 
go to the cause. 

A better way would be to say "no thanks," then find 
(Mit the ^klress of the charity and send the donation di- 
rectly, so that the charity gets the full amount, not the 
telemarketers who often take anywhere fitom 25% to 85% 
as administrative costs. 

For more information, check out 
www.charitynavigatcM-.com. 



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by Captain Tom LyiMis 

Fin JhtV€iUkm Bunau 



New Year's Resolutions 



At a loss for some New 
Year's resolutions this year? 

Here's a list to choose 
from; feel free to use any one 
of these fire prevention sug- 
gestions. Overall, what bet- 
ter way to start the New Year, 
considering behavioral 
changes for a safer home 
lifestyle? 

• I won't leave cooking 
unattended, and if I must for 
a moment leave the kitchen, 
I'll bring along evidence of 
my efforts, a potholder as a 
reminder. 

• I won't casually store or 
place combustibles onto the 
stovetop. 

• When I am using 
candles, I won't do so leav- 
ing them unattended in a 
room. 

• When I smoke, I won't 



do so lying on a couch or 
mattress. 

• I will test my smoke de- 
tectors monthly, and change 
the batteries when I change 
the clocks. 

• I will test my CO detec- 
tor monthly and make certain 
the batteries are changed as 
well. 

• I will clean the lint trap 
in the clothes dryer before or 
after each use. 

• I will not leave the 
house with the clothes dryer 
left on. 

• If an electrical plug, 
cord or appliance is faulty, I 
will see this as an indication 
that the same should be re- 
tired or repaired before any 
further use. 

• I will maintain a five- 
foot clearance between my 



heating system and stored 
combustibles. 

• I will occasionally re- 
mind all family members of 
our home emergency evacu- 
ation plan and practice it if 
need be. 

Feel free to start the New 
Year with any of these safety 
resolutions, while my hope 
in doing so; they become 
second nature and habit for 
you. 

Have a great year, while I 
plan to be here to continue 
reminding you to have a safe 
one as well. I hope that my 
coaxing, pestering ad educat- 
ing will help you maintain a 
safe home environment for 
all. Meanwhile, I appreciate 
your efforts. 

As always, it is my plea- 
sure to serve. Be safe. 

Captain Lyons 




FORMER MARINE Robert Godfrey stands with his sons hhu brother, and two grandsons at 
A.L. Niclierson Post Six of the seven family members are Marines or former Marines. Shown left 
to right are former Marine Sgt. Steven Godfl-ey, former Lt Col. Richard Godfrey, Godfrey, 
former L/Cpl Robert Godf^y, Jr., Cpl. Richard Godfrey, Cpl. Ryan Croak and former Army 
PFC Doug Godfrey. 

Koch To Take Oath 
Monday As 33rd Mayor 



COA Friendly Visitor Program Seeking Volunteers 



The Quincy Council on 
Aging (COA) is seeking 
volunteers for the agency's 
Friendly Visitor Program. 

The Friendly Visitor 
Program matches volunteers 
with elderly persons who live 



alone and away from family 
and friends. These volunteers 
offer companionship during 
their visits with the elderly 
person. Background checks 
are conducted on all 
volunteers. 



Interested seniors who 
live alone and would like to 
participate in the program are 
invited to register with the 
council. 

For more information, call 
the COA AT 617-376-1508. 



M£AT 
RAffCe 

B^RY SffrURDAY 
ATtPM 

Qi/wcy Cooes op iucs 
2S4 QuARRy Strut 

Ofii/t/ To Wi pueuc 

2f ySARS /wo OtOiR 

• ? Tl^ys Of AssoRTio 
Mem 

• P SiGOm PRfZiS 

• POOORPRfZiS 

• 2 MoNcyJRAn 

' f OoMeeRCR PMZi 

fRBB RiPRiSHMiim 



Steven R. Striffler 

Attorney At Law 



•CONSTRUCTION 
•REAL ESTATE 
• FORECLOSURE 



268 Summer St., Ste 300 

Boston, MA 02210 

617-290-1573 



www.strifflerlaw.com 



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ATRIA MARINA PLACE 

Four Seaport Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 | www.atrianiarinaplace.com 

Residency terms and agreements apply. Valid for new residents 

only. Must become a resident by January 3 1 , 2008, to receive 

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few complete details. Not valid with any other offers. 

Bta 735.20615 



(Cont'd Front Page 1) 
Other councillors include 
Leo Kelly, Ward 1; Daniel 
Raymondi, Ward 2; Kevin 
Coughlin, Ward 3; Doug 
Gutro, Ward 5; Brian 
McNamee, Ward 6; John 
Keenan, Joe Finn and 
Michael McFarland, at large. 
Mayor Koch, who will be 
chairman of the School 
Conmiittee by virtue of his 
office, will administer the 
oath to incoming members of 
the Committee. 

Reelected to new four- 
year terms were Elaine 
Dwyer and David McCarthy. 



Jo-Ann Bragg was returned 
to the Committee after a 
four-year absence. 

McCarthy is expected to 
be named vice chairman of 
the School Committee and 
will make his remarks fol- 
lowing his election. 

Musical interludes during 
the inaugural will be pro- 
vided by the North Quincy 
High School Choir, directed 
by Timothy Carew. They will 
sing the National Anthem, 
"America the Beautiful" and 
close out the ceremonies 
with a rendition of "My 
America." 



A trio of clergymen will 
lead prayers starting with the 
Rev. James F. Hawker, vicar 
of education for the Diocese 
of Charlotte, N.C. and for- 
merly at Sacred Heart 
Church in North Quincy, a 
personal friend of the Koch 
family; continuing with Ma- 
jor Douglas F. Jones of the 
Quincy Salvation Army and 
concluding with the Rev. Ri- 
chard M. Law, pastor of the 
Wollaston Lutheran Church. 

Color guards for the day 
will be from the Quincy Po- 
lice and Fire Departments, 




Cardiovascular disease is one of the most pressing health concerns in our region. 

South Shore Hospital's Cardiovascular Center team is dedicated to providing 
community programs that promote the early detection, treatment and 
management of these diseases. 

CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH: WHAT YOU CAN DO 

Saturday, January 19, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
at Lantana, 43 Scanion Drive, Randolph 

Learn from our cardiovascular experts what you can do to minimize your risk 
of having a heart attack, stroke or other health complications. 

Complimentary continental breakfast and lunch are included. 

Advance reservations are encouraged because seating is Umited at this free 
community benefits program. 



Call (781) 340-8272 or visit 
southshorehospital.org for details. 



B B Hospital 



1 




Page 14 TMm 



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MANET HEALTH CENTER Board of Directors met at the group's annual autumn auction. Left 
to right, Maureen Coneys, Kathleen (iavin-Robinson, Treasurer Joseph Renzl, Ken Dyer, 
Barbara Morris, CEO Toni McGuire, President Robert l^ittleHeld, Linda Kelly, Betty Swanton, 
Vice President John Brothers, Alicia Gardner and Joseph Reardon. Missing from picture are 
(>ayann Wilkinson, Joan MacDonald and Secretary Elise Kline. 

Quimy Sun photos/Robert Noble 



JAY McQUADE, formerly of WBZ-TV, was master of ceremonies at Manet's Autumn Auction. 



Manet Health Center Auction Raises $49,000 



The Manet C\)tnniuni(y 
Heallh Center's fourth an- 
nual autumn auction raised 
some ,$4'>.()(K) to support the 
leiiler's activities ottering 
health eaie lo residents ol 
UmiK > aiul the South Shore. 

A 11 ton I a McCiuire, 

Manels CIX). presented the 
2(107 M.uiel Medallion to 
Mlue ( ross Blue Shield of 
Massachusetts lor its eontri- 
hutioiis as true partners m the 
eomnumity. 

Steve (lore. a patient at 
Manet's Hull location, pro- 
vided testimony lo the 



Health Center's role in help- 
ing him battle back from can- 
cer over 20 months ago to 
ride in the Pan Mass Chal- 
lenge. 

Jay McQuade, a former 
WBZ-TV and Radio talent, 
now director of Internal 
Communications for Blue 
Cross Blue Shield acted as 
master of ceremonies at the 
autumn auction. 

For more information, 
call Manet's Development 
Office at 617-376-3030. ex- 
tension 253. 




MAUREEN CONEYS, corporate vice president of Blue Cross 

Blue Shield of Massachusetts, accepts Manet Medallion for STEVE DORE recounted for the Autumn Auction 

2007 from Antonia McGuire, CEO of Manet Health Center. Manet Health helped him to recover from cancer. 



crowd how 



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Quincy 



Conveniently located 
near Quincy Center (f) 




WoUaston Beach Friends Meeting Jan. 17 



The Friends of Wollaston 
Beach will hold their first 
annual meeting Thursday, 
Jan. 17, at 7 p.m. at 
Beechwood Knoll School, 
222 Fenno St. 

The agenda will include 
a review of the year 2007, the 
annual awards, the installa- 
tion of officers for 2008, and 
updates on plans for the com- 
ing year. 

A special guest speaker, 



historian Tom Galvin, will 
review the history of 
Wollaston Beach through 
historic photographs, post- 
cards and stories. 

Doors will open at 6:30 
p.m. and refreshments will 



be served. The meeting is 
open to the public at no 
charge but new members are 
always welcome. Dues are 
$10 a year. 

For more details, visit 
www.wollastonbeach.org. 




PROFESSIONAL 

RECTO 




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on-line or what the home down the street sold for! FREE 
computerized list of sales with pictures in your neighborhood 
E-mailed or mailed. FREE 24 hr pre-recorded message. 

1-800-611-0351 1.D. #1002 
www.QuincyWhatsMyHomeWorth.com 





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FOOTTNOm 

by Joel Chariton, DJPJL 

MfiMHlt^AMikMlMtfiilMiiMeliffery 




TREATING RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN THE FOOT 



Notary Public 

526 Sea Street, Quincy 



PhoM 617-472-8100 



Fax 617-472-8131 




Qumcy's Own Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 



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You Will Enjoy Consistent Identification 
• Quality Reactership • 



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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 
is a systemic disease that 
affects multiple joints in the 
body. If you have RA, it's 
likely that you have felt it in 
your feet or ankles, as 90% 
of RA patients do. The toes 
and front of the feet are usu- 
ally the first parts of the feet 
to have symptoms, but the 
pain soon spreads to the 
back of the foot and the 
ankle. You can treat the pain 
with over-the-counter pain 
relievers. If you still feel pain, 
your podiatrist may prwcrtoe 
medteatk>n, or even inject 
steroids into the affected 
pints. Because people with 
RA in the feet and ankl^ are 
susceptjbie to hammertoes, 
be sure to wear a shoe with 
ctfi extoa deep toe box. 
We're concerned cOxxjt 
(tf your hesyth. 



especially in the health of 
your feet. When your feet 
have painful joints, are 
cramping or uncomfortable, 
or are otherwise trying to 
tell you something, don't 
hesitate to call us. Our goal 
is provide you with a com- 
prehensive diagnosis and 
treatment plan so that you 
are out of pain and back on 
your feet in as short amount 
of time as possible. For an 
appointment at QUINCY 
MEDICAL CENTER, please 
call us at 781-966-3668. 
0ffk» hours are also avafl- 
able at 999 North Main St., 
in the Randolph Medrcal Of- 
fice BuikJing, and Milton 
Medrcal Building in Suite 
221. 

P.S: Exercise » one way 
to manage RA in the foot 
sffximlde. 



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niursday, January 3, 2008 



PageHf 



Agenda For Conservation 
Commission Meeting Jan. 9 



The regular meeting of the 
Quincy Conservation 
Commission will be held 
Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Conference 
Room, City of Quincy Park 
Department, One 

Merrymount Pkwy, Quincy. 
The public is invited to attend. 

The pubUc meetings and 
hearings on the agenda 
follow: 

7:30p.iii. Notice of 
Intent filed by Terrence 
Hillery, for the construction 
of a prdtesed addition to the 
existiilP^* dwelling, on 
proper^ located at 129 
Bayside Rd., Quincy. Land 
subject to coastal storm 
flowage; 100-foot buffer 
zone of coastal bank and 
beach. 

7:35p.iii. Request 
for Determination of 
Applicability filed by 
Councillor Brian McNamee 
and Jean Green, Seaside 
Gardeners of Squantum, for 
the breaking up of and 
removal of debris in the creek 
behind the Ayers Bros. 
Garage, and the school bus 
yard, on property located on 
Lot 23 , Assessor' s Plan 6076- 
E, Quincy, MA Saltmarsh; 
Tidal Creek; Land Subject to 
Coastal Storm Flowage. 

7:40 p.m. Notice^f 



Intent filed by Gregory 
Seymourian for the 
demolition of the existing 
single-family dwelling, and 
construction of a new single- 
family dwelling, and creation 
of appropriate compensatory 
storage on site, on property 
located at 154 Rice Rd., 
Quincy. 

Barrier Beach; Land 
Subject to Coast Storm 
Flowage; 100-foot buffer 
zone of bordering vegetated 
wetlands 

7:45 p.in. Notice of Intent 
filed by Bemardine Rines for 
theO replacement of five (5) 
piles on dwelling foundation, 
nine (9) footings on front 
porch and two (2) footings 
on side porch, all with new 
concrete piles to four (4'0") 
below grade, on property 
located at 63 Teine Rd., 
Quincy 

Barrier Beach; Lurd 
Subject to Coast Storm 
Flowage; 

7:50 p.m. Notice of 
Intent filed by Michael 
Cremin for the prior 
construction of an addition 
to the existing dwelling, on 
property located at 433 
Quincy Shore Drive, Quincy. 
100-foot buffer zone of 
Coastal Bank/Beach, 100- 
foot buffer zone to Land 



Subject to Coast Storm 
Flowage (Quincy Wetlands 
Protection Ordinance only) 

7:55 p.m. Notice of 
Intent filed by Caron O'Neil 
for the proposed demolition 
and reconstruction of the 
existing dwelling, 

reconstruction of the 
damaged seawall, and for the 
placement of stone due to 
stcwm damage (Emergency 
Certificate issued in January, 
2007), on property located at 
1 8 Nut Island Ave., Coastal 
Beach; Land Subject to Coast 
Storm Flowage 

8:00 p.m. Notice of 
Intent filed by Stephen 
O'Donnell, commissioner. 
City of Quincy, Department 
of Public Works, for the 
replacement of a subsurface 
wastewater pumping station, 
on property located at 440 
East Squantum St. Land 
Subject to Coast Storm 
Flowage, 100-foot Buffer 
Zone of Saltmarsh/Bordering 
Vegetated Wetlands 

8:05 p.m. Notice of 
Intent filed by Thomas 
Galgana for the subdivision 
of the existing residential lot, 
and construction of two 
additional single-family 
dwellings on property located 
at 22 Gannett Rd. 

(Cont'd On Page 28) 




.>r' 



THE FURNACE BROOK GOLF Club with its trees and touch of snow, makes a peaceful post- 
card-like setting. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 



Be Prepared For 



(Cont'd From Page 4) 

school." 

MEMA reconunends: 
• Ask an out-of-state rela- 
tive or friend to serve as fam- 
ily contact. After a disaster 
it is often easier to call long 
distance than across town. 
CalUng outside the area will 
be easier than calling into a 



disaster area. 

• Make sure everyone 
knows the name, address and 
telephone number of the con- 
tact person. 

• Sometimes an emer- 
gency can impact your whole 
neighborhood or small sec- 
tion of town. Decide on an 



Of Winter 



alternate meeting area for 
family members. 

• Be familiar with the 
Emergency Plan at your 
children's school and your 
place of business. 

For additional informa- 
tion, visit the MEMA 
website at www.mass.gov/ 
mema. 



Ward 4 Neighborhood Association 
To Host Councillor Davis Jan. 15 



The Ward 4 Neighbor- 
hood Association will host 
Ward 4 City Councillor Jay 
Davis for coffee and conver- 
sation Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7 



p.m. 

The association is located 
at 100 Brooks Ave. (attached 
to the Delia Chiesa School). 

All Ward 4 residents are 



invited to attend. 

Davis will update con- 
stituents on happenings in 
Ward 4 and his new role as 
president of the City Coun- 
cil. 



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Thursday, January io I 11 a,m, - 3 p,m, 

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Protecting Your Family 

Change Your Clocks Change Your Battery 



By Samantha Mazzotta 



Water-Stained 
Ceiling 

2, The ceiling in my 
• hallway is showing 
r stains in two places. 
Why are these stains 
appearing there, well 
below the roof? — Boyd L., 
Springfield, Mass. 

A .Detecting the source 
• of the leak may take a 
little work, but if there is no 
sign of water leaking into 
the attic, the next likely 
explanation is that a pipe is 
leaking near or above the 
hallway ceiling. 

If you cannot access the 
pipe run in that area to check 
it, you'll need to contact a 
plumber, who may have to 
break through a wall (or 
even the ceiling itself) to 
repair the leak. However, it's 
much better to find and solve 
the problem as fast as possi- 
ble, rather than risk thou- 
sai\ds of dollars in water 
damage down the road. 

Make sure the plumber is 
licensed m your state and 
bonded, and get all estimates 
in writing — insist that you 
approve all work before it's 
performed. Invasive repairs 
— like removing wallboard 
to get to the pipes behind it 



Q: 



— should be made to match 
as closely as possible to the 
original wall. 

In one of your 
. columns you recom- 
mended a product called 
''Leml-Shine" that would 
clean hard water stains 
from windows. I looked for 
it at my local Wal-Mart, 
but they do not carry it. I 
don *t have access to a com- 
puter so I can't go to its 
Web site. Would you have a 
mailing address for them 
instead? Thank you. — 
Joan K., Brick, N J. 

A .The manufacturer of 
• Lemi-Shine is Envi- 
rocon Technologies, Inc. 
You can write to the compa- 
ny at the following address: 
Envirocon Technologies, 
Inc. 
P.O. Box 4444 
Midland, TX 79704 
You can also call 888-336- 
2582. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homegu- 
ru2000@hotmail.com, or 
write This Is a Hammer, cio 
King Features Weekly Ser- 
vice. P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando. FL 32853-6475. 

C 2007 King Features Synd., Inc. 



(NAPS) - Thousands of 
homes and perhaps as many 
lives have been saved by one 
simple idea. 

It connects two unrelated 
activities-changing clocks 
from Daylight Savings Time 
and changing the batteries in 
home safety devices. You 
should change the batteries 
on important safety alarms 
such as smoke alarms and 
carbon monoxide detectors 
almost anytime, but in fact, 
many don't. It *s a sad fact 
that approximately 80 
percent of fatal home fire 
victims are children killed in 
homes without working 
smoke alarms. Hardly 
anyone neglects to change 
the clocks. so the 
International Association of 
Fire Chiefs (lAFC) and 
Energizer batteries joined 
forces 20 years ago to urge 
Americans through the 
Change Your Clock Change 
Your Battery program to use 
the "extra hour" to change 



their smoke and carbon 
monoxide detector batteries. 

In 2007, the day to set 
your clocks back and change 
the batteries in your smoke 
detector is November 4. 

"We have no way of 
knowing exactly how many 
lives and homes have been 
saved as a result," said Chief 
Steven Westermann, 
president of the lAFC. "What 
we do know is that each year 
more Americans are 
replacing their batteries are 
replacing their batteries 
before they wear out and that 
makes each alarm safer." 

You can cut the odds of 
dying in a home fire nearly in 
half by adopting this simple 
habit. Most American 
homes-96 percent in fact- 
have smoke alarms. But 
approximately 19 percent of 
them have at least one non- 
working smoke alarm, 
mostly due to wom out or 
missing batteries. The lAFC 
estimates that over 25 million 



homes are at risk. 

The most common 
reasons home smoke alarms 
do not function properly are: 

• Batteries are not replaced 
in a timely fashion. 

• Batteries are removed 
due to unwanted activation 
from situations such as 
cooking fumes. 

• Batteries are removed 
due to the "chirping sound," 
which actually indicates the 
battery needs to be replaced. 

• Alarms and detectors are 
not cleaned regularly. 

• Alarm is aged and may 
contain outdated parts or 
technology. 



monoxide since it is a 
colorless, odorless gas. 

In addition, November 
can bring severe weather, a 
time when power outages are 
more frequent. Avoid using 
candles, which are often the 
cause of home fires. Use 
flashlights instead. Daylight 
Saving Time is a good time 
to check those batteries, as 
well as the batteries in carbon 
monoxide detectors, suggest 
the experts at Energizer. 

The lAFC is a nonprofit 
association representing 
nearly 13,000 chief fire 
officials worldwide. Its 
members are the world's 



"Many people mistakenly ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ j„ ^-^^ 
believe they will either see fighting, emergency medical 



the flames or smell the smoke 
when a fire breaks out," Chief 
Westermann said. "But most 
fire fatalities happen while 
families are asleep. Smoke 
by itself doesn't provide a 
wake-up call, but a working 
smoke alarm does." The same 
holds true with carbon 



services, terronsm response, 
hazardous materials spills, 
natural disasters, search and 
rescue and public safety 
legislation. 

You can learn more about 
fire safety online at 
www.iafc.org and 

www.energizer.com . 



Winter Deck 'Survival' Tips 



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(NAPS) - With another 
winter just around the comer, 
it's time to start thinking 
about cleaning, restoring and 
protecting your deck so it 
survives the onslaught of ice, 
snow, sleet and moisture that 
can damage it during the 
months ahead. Here are some 
deck "survival" tips from the 
experts at Wolman Wood 
Care Products: 

Step 1: Clean your deck 
to remove the dirt, mildew 
and food stains that 
accumulated over the spring 
and summer months. Use a 



specially formulated deck 
cleaner like Wolman 
DeckBrite, which features an 
oxygenated bleach formula 
that removes grayed wood 
surfaces, ground-in dirt and 
the toughest stains. It restores 
wood to its natural, like new 
look without bleaching or 
degrading its structure, such 
as chlorine bleach solutions 
can. It even removes invisible 
coating barriers, like excess 
wax, mill glaze and old, 
water-repellent residue. 

On previously stained 
wood, strip any faded. 



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deteriorated or unwanted 
colored coating with a 
product like Wolman 
DeckStrip ASR Acrylic Stain 
Remover. It removes oil and 
water-based solid, semi- 
transparent and clear 
fmishes-and even tough-to- 
remove 100 percent acrylic 
stains-and prepares wood for 
a new finish or stain. It 
contains special wetting 
agents and thickeners that 
cling to all wood surfaces- 
even vertical surfaces-so it's 
great for fences, gazebos, 
play sets and other outdoor 
wood surfaces! 

Step 2: After the wood is 
restored and your deck is rid 
of surface barriers or 
unwanted finishes, it is 



important to seal it with a 
protective water-repellent 
finish and preservative. 
Water repellents stop rain, 
sleet, snow and ice form 
penetrating the wood surface, 
which can cause cracking, 
splitting and warping. Select 
a product like Wolman F& P 
Finish and Preservative, 
which offers a guarantee on 
water-repellent longevity so 
you won't have to apply a 
new coat every year. It also 
contains an EPA-registered 
preservative that prevents 
surface mold and mildew 
growth, rot and decay. 

Want more deck 
"survival" tips? Visit 
www.wolman.com or call 
(732)469-8100. 



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Neighborhood Housing 
Homebuyer Workshop 



REALTORS FROM THE Jack Conway Co. presented a check as part of the more than $37,000 
raised in total for Habitat for Humanity through Dancing with the Realtors. From left, Patrick 
ODonnell from Landmark Real Estate in Quincy, AnneMarie Paul and John Paul from Dance 
Sport Boston, Jennifer Kern from Conway-Quincy, Jerry McDermott, executive director of 
South Shore Habitat for Humanity; Diane Furness from Conway-Quincy, Lynne OBrien from 
Conway-Hull, Cheryl Baker from Conway-Hanson and SSHFH Board President Christopher 
Dunn. 

Realtors Help Raise $37,000 
For Habitat For Humanity 



The money raised from the event at the Park Plaza 
the first-ever PASS (Ply- Hotel in February. 



mouth and South Shore As- 
sociation of Realtors) Danc- 
ing with the Realtors compe- 
tition was presented recently 
to the South Shore and 
Greater Plymouth chapters 
of the Habitat for Humanity. 
Realtors from the Jack 
Conway Co, presented a 



"It was so much fun and 
we were able to do some- 



thing to help," Kern said. 
"And Im really excited to 
keep going and learning even 
more." 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of the South Shore, 
in conjunction with South 
Shore Savings Bank, will 
host a first-time homebuyer 
workshop Monday, Jan. 28 
from 6 to 8 p.m. and Satur- 
day, Feb. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

The workshop, open to all 
Massachusetts residents re- 
gardless of income, will be 
held at South Shore Savings 
Bank, 1584 Main St., 
Weymouth. 

Attendance at both ses- 
sions is necessary to receive 
a homebuying certificate. 

All potential first-time 
homebuyers are encouraged 
to attend the educational 
workshop. At the workshop, 
participants will have the 
opportunity to speak with a 
lender. 

Topics covered include 
mortgage options, legal as- 
pects of the home buying 



process, how a home inspec- 
tion works, and other presen- 
tations from related profes- 
sionals. 

Participants must com- 
plete the workshop to qualify 



for grant programs. 

There is a $ 1 5 fee per per- 
son. 

To register, or for more 
information, call (617) 770- 
2227 ext. 29. 




Quincy Community Action Homebuyer Workshop 



Quincy Community Ac- 
tion Programs, Inc. (QCAP) 
will hold a free first-time 
homebuyer workshop at the 
Tufts Library, located at 46 



check as part of the more 3,^,^^ St., Weymouth in Feb 
than $37,(XX) raised in total 



for Habitat for Humanity. 

The 22 Realtors who 
competed in the contest, all 
invested months of their time 
and much of their money into 
preparing for their perfor- 
mance. Many spent more 
than $1,000 on private and 
group dancing lessons, 
which were discounted for 
PASS through two local stu- 
dios: Fred Astaire in 
Hanover, and DanceSport 
Boston in Weymouth. 

Conway-Quincy top 
agent Jennifer Kern not only 
helped raise money, but also 
finished sixth in her division 
and quaUfied for the finals of 



ruary. 
Workshop dates are: 
Saturday, Feb. 2 from 9 

a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday, 

Feb. 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Participants must attend 

both sessions in order to re- 



ceive a certificate of atten- 
dance. 

The sessions are open to 
everyone regardless of in- 
come, credit ratings, or 
downpayment availability. 

Workshop speakers are 
professionals representing 
different real estate fields. 

Participants will receive a 
workbook, which contains 
references that pertain to 
home buying. 



Home Of The Week 



Participants who complete 
the course will receive a cer- 
tificate which is a pre-requi- 
site for downpayment clos- 
ing cost assistance, favorable 
soft second and Mass Hous- 
ing mortgages. 

Registration is required. 

For more information on 
this workshop or future 
workshops, contact Ann 
Marie Casey at 617-479- 
8181 ext. 119. 



^■snsiOfl 



The Very Best 
Tips of 2007 

• "After the rush of the hol- 
idays, our family has a little 
tradition of its own. We 
reserve one night to watch 
all our home movies from 
the season. We usually end 
up watching some of the 
other years ' too. And our son 
has become a whiz at putting 
together slideshows on 
DVD of digital pictures, so 
we look forward to the first 
of many photo slideshows to 
add to the night's entertain- 
ment." — Y.K. in Alabama 

• "I usually get plastic bags 
when grocery shopping, but 
I have the bagger package all 
frozen foods together in a 
paper bag. The bag is easily 
identifiable so it can be tak- 
en inside and put away first." 
— A.D. in Washington 

• "To keep the fabric belts 
on my daughters' shorts and 
pants in place, I stitched the 
center of the belt to the back 
loop of the garment. The 
bow never pulls to one side, 
or falls off! It's great for 
keeping them with the right 



pair of pants or shorts." — 
O.S. in Wisconsin 

• "If you have small chil- 
dren, you might want tc 
keep a red washcloth in youj 
first-aid kit. Sometimes, th« 
sight of blood can upset i 
child out of proportion witl- 
the injury. If you use a rec 
washcloth, blood won'' 
show and you can spenc 
your time calming the hurt 
not the emotion." — School 
nurse in Arizona 

• "I hang two mesh laundrj 
bags from the back of tht 
bathroom door. Bras anc 
undergarments go into one 
socks in the other. I tos5 
them in the wash just as the) 
are, and no sorting is 
required after they arc 
done." — D.C. in Mississip- 
pi 

Send your tips to Now 
Here's a Tip, do King Fea- 
tures Weekly Service, P.O 
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 
32853-6475 or e-mai, 
JoAnn a. 

heresatip@yahoo.com . 



© 2007 King Features Synd.. Inc. 




fiy//ng, SelWng or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 

61 7-328-3200 




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COMPANY, INC. 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

www.JackConway.com 

The Largest Independently Owned 

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by Geoff * 

1y CENTURY 21 
Annex Realty agent 
Theresa Repoff knows 
tiiisareo like the back ^^ 

ot her hand. Stie was " ^ 

extremely supportive 
when helping me find 
my first home. Theresa ., ^ , 
went the extra mile to '^^^^ 
help me close the sale '''■^^■'* * 
and reassured me when ''''7'' 
thmgs were unclear. ;^: " 

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49 Beale SI 
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3 New Staff Members Join Milton Hospital 



by AndrM Wyill 

MaS>S«| CaSiCaSi 

Exercising After 
Childbirth 

The first several weeks 
after childbirth can be a hec- 
tic time of adjustment. Find- 
ing time to begin or resume 
an exercise program can 
become challenging, but the 
benefits — increased ener- 
gy, stress-relief and aiding 
in the return to your pre- 
pregnancy body type — 
make the effort worthwhile. 

Once your physician has 
given you the go-ahead, 
keep these post-pregnancy 
tips in mind when starting or 
re-starting your exercise 
program. 

• Get back in sync with 
your body. Over the past 
nine months, many changes 
have occurred in your body 
weight, body fat and center 
of gravity. As you begin to 
return to your pre-pregnan- 
cy condition, it is important 
to take your time and re- 
educate your muscles, joints 
and cardiovascular system. 

• If you followed an exer- 
cise regimen before and 
during pregnancy (after 
your physician's clearance), 
continue your exercise pro- 
gram at the same level as 
right before you gave birth. 
Slowly progress to your pre- 
pregnancy exercise routine. 
Let your body be your 
guide. Allow your body to 
get reacquainted with the 
increase in intensity. (If you 
did not have an exercise rou- 
tine before or during preg- 
nancy, consult your physi- 
cian about an appropriate 
fitness regimen.) 



• Don't exercise to exhaus- 
tion. Throw the phrase "No 
pain, no gain" out the win- 
dow. Pace yourself and start 
off slowly. You may find 
walking with your baby for 
20 minutes is all you can do 
for now. That's OK. Gradu- 
ally increase your intensity 
level. The next step may be 
to try walking for 15 min- 
utes twice a day. At the end 
of the day you'll have com- 
pleted 30 minutes of aerobic 
exercise, and that's a great 
start. 

• Wear supportive cloth- 
ing. Uncomfortable work- 
out clothes can discourage 
you from completing your 
exercise routine. If you are 
lactating, it may be neces- 
sary to wear a supportive bra 
— or j)ossibly two. The 
changes to your breasts may 
make ordinary exercises 
more difficult. Take the time 
to find comfortable and sup- 
portive workout attire that 
works for you. 

Have fun and remember to 
give your body time to 
respond and change. Allow 
your exercise program to 
enhance the happiness of 
you and yoiir new baby. 

Andrea Renee Wyatt, 
M.S.S., C.S.C.S., is a per- 
sonal trainer with an exten- 
sive background in strength 
and conditioning as well as 
therapeutic recreation. If 
you ha\>e a fitness or train- 
ing question, write to 
Andrea in care of King Fea- 
tures Weekly Senice, P.O. 
Box 536475. Orlando. FL 
32853-6475. 

O 2007 King Features Synd., Inc. 




by Steven ABrustIn, D.M.D. 

JOINT EFFORT 

The temporomandibular tioning properly so that you can 



joints (TMJ) connect the lower 
jaw to the skull (temporal 
bone) under each ear. These 
joints are among the roost com- 
plex in the body. As the mouth 
opens, the knob-like ends 
(condyles) of the mandible first 
rotate, then slide forward along 
the curving lower edges of the 
temporal bones. The motion of 
the joints is controlled by the 
chewing muscles. These joints 
are also greatly affected by the 
teeth, which largely detemiine 



chew, eat and speak without 
discomfort. Imagine the differ- 
ence in how you'll look and feel 
afterwards! Visit us for a 
through TMJ exam and return 
to a healthier, vital you. When 
was the last time you had a 
com{»nehensive dental examina- 
tion? We make every effort to 
see you promptly and listen to 
your concerns and needs. We 
will let you know about new 
procedures and technologies 
and w hat they can do for you. 



the relationship of the jaws For superior dental care. caU 

when the mouth is closed. TMJ 6 1 7-479-6220 to schedule an 

disorder produces symptoms af^inunent. We're located at 

ranging from headaches to 44 Greenleaf Street. We offer 

clicking sounds when the jaw the sovkes of anesthesiology 

is opened and closed. Because with a fully trained and quali- 



malocclusion (bad bite) may 
be a ccHitributing factor to TMJ 
syndrome, the dentist may help 
toranedyit 

It's our goal, through 
th^apy, to get your jaws func- 



fied anesthesiologist. Visit us 
on the web at 
w^frW.q«iKy<kDtigt.wm. 

P.S. Psychological stress 
also appears to imderiie many 
TMJ disorJers. 



Milton Hospital, a clinical 
affiliate of Beth Israel Dea- 
coness Medical Center pro- 
viding community-based 
health care, announces the 
appointment of three new 
staff members: Ira Chan, 
M.D., Lisa M. Colombo, 
R.N., M.H.A. and Aisha P. 
Saunders. 

Gynecologist Ira Chan, 
M.D., has joined Milton 
Hospital's medical staff as a 
result of the Hospital's clini- 
cal affiliation with Beth Is- 
rael Deaconess Medical 
Center, Boston. 

Dr. Chan completed his 
residency in obstetrics and 
gynecology and received his 
doctorate of medicine at 
SUNY Stony Brook in New 
York. He has also served as 
an instructor in obstetrics, 
gynecology and reproductive 
biology at Harvard Medical 
School and as an associate in 
obstetrics and gynecology at 
Beth Israel Deaconess Medi- 
cal Center. 

Lisa M. Colombo, R.N., 
M.H.A., joins the Milton 
Hospital team as vice presi- 
dent of Patient Care Services 
and chief nursing officer. 
Colombo received her mas- 
ter of health administration 
degree from Clark Univer- 





IRACHAN,M.D. 

sity and was previously the 
executive director of Ambu- 
latory Operations at Beth Is- 
rael Deaconess Medical 
Center. 

In addition to her conunu- 
nity involvement and profes- 
sional achievements, Co- 
lombo was the recipient of 
the 2006 Sloane Fellowship 
award from Beth Israel Dea- 
coness Medical Center and is 
a former member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Organization of 
Nurse Executives. 

Aisha P. Saunders joins 
Milton Hospital as a devel- 
opment officer in the Office 
of Public Relations and De- 
velopment. Saunders re- 
ceived her master of man- 
agement degree from Cam- 
bridge College and comes to 
Milton Hospital with over 15 



LISA M. COLOMBO, R.N. 



years of management expe- 
rience. 

During her career, she has 
worked with The Boston 
Globe, and most recently at 
her alma mater, Wheaton 
College in Norton, as the 
leadership gifts officer. In 
addition to her professional 
successes, she has donated 
her time since 2004 to 
Friends of Tutoring Plus of 
Cambridge, MA and serves 
on the Board of Celebrate 
Milton, an annual commu- 
nity event held in Milton. 

"We couldn't be happier 
about our new staff mem- 
bers," said Hospital Chief 
Executive Officer Joseph 
Morrissey. "In their roles, 
they will assist Milton Hos- 
pital as we continue to grow. 
It's a real accomplishment to 



AISHA P. SAUNDERS 

attract such talented staff 
members who enable us to 
better serve Milton and the 
surrounding commimities." 

Milton Hospital provides 
community-based health 
care to people of all ages in 
Milton, Quincy, Braintree, 
Randolph, Canton, Hyde 
Park, Dorchester and other 
local communities. Services 
include general medical and 
surgical inpatient care, a 
complete complement of 
outpatient health services 
and 24-hour emergency ser- 
vices. 

The hospital is a clinical 
affiliate of Beth Israel Dea- 
coness Medical Center, and 
has more than 250 physi- 
cians on staff, representing 
primary care and 22 differ- 
ent medical specialties. 



Shaking The Salt From Your Diet 



(NAPS) - Americans say 
they've taken news about 
sodium to heart. But have 
they taken steps to protect 
their health? 

More than 90 percent of 
people recently surveyed 
identified high blood 
pressure as one of the biggest 
health problems caused by 
high sodium intake. 
However, only a quarter of 
those surveyed were 
concerned about the level of 



sodium in their diets. 

Their lack of concern 
could lead to a host of health 
problems, as high sodium 
intake has been linked to 
increased risk for heart 
disease, high blood pressure 
and stroke. 

A Growing Problem 
According to the National 
Health and Nutrition 
Examination Survey, 
Americans consume 3,375 
milligrams of sodium daily. 



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which is 40 percent more than 
the recommended daily 
allowance called for by the 
United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA). 

Smart Solutions 

The good news is that 
there are plenty of ways to 
reduce the sodium in your 
diet without cutting out taste 
or favorite foods. 

"The most common 
problem I hear about many 
lower-sodium snacks is they 
simply do not taste as great 
as their full-sodium 
counterparts, but sometimes, 
due to health concerns, 
consimiers might not have 
any other option," says 



Carolyn O'Neil, registered 
dietitian. 

Another way to reduce the 
amount of sodium you eat is 
to replace table salt with 
pepper, lemon or even garlic 
powder. Just a dash of thee 
low-sodium seasonings adds 
a distinct flair to foods, 
without putting your health 
at risk. 

Finally, eat fresh fruit and 
vegetables and read the labels 
on canned foods. While there 
are lower-sodium varieties, 
canned foods tend to be high 
in sodium-even canned 
vegetables. 

For more low-sodium 
snack ideas, visit 
www.orville.com. 



New Yoga Classes At 
Beechwood Starts This Month 



Beechwood on the Bay, 
440 East Squantum St., North 
Quincy, announces it has 
scheduled two new classes 
of yoga begiiming in January . 

The chair class will be 
offered on Wednesdays at 
9:30 a.m. 



An evening gentle yoga 
class will be offered 
Thursdays at 6:45 p.m. 

Both classes will be taught 
by Beechwood instructor 
Ellen Murphy. 

For information or to 
register, call (6 1 7) 47 1 -57 1 2. 




QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 
617-471-3100 



Thursday, Jttiuary 5, 2^08 Xlk# 



>?r 



ni^i9 



Quincy Defeats Nauset, Foxboro 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

The holiday vacation 
week brought with it two last 
second victories for the 
Quincy High School girls' 
basketball team. 

The Presidents (3-1, 1-0 
in ACL play) started their 
Christmas/New Year's 
vacation with a pulsating 46- 
44 victory over league rival 
Nauset High School on Dec. 
21 and, then continued their 
last second heroics in a 38- 
37 win over Foxboro HS in 
the first round of the Dick's 
Sporting Goods Holiday 
ClaBliB at Dedham High 
School on Dec. 27 (Quincy 
played in the championship 
game on Dec. 28 but The Sun 
had an early deadline because 
of the New Year hohday.) 

The game against 
Foxboro was a tight-knit 
affair through the first three- 
quarters. The Presidents and 
Warriors were tied heading 
into the fourth and final 
period. After Quincy built a 
six-point lead to start the 
fourth quarter, Foxboro 
stormed back to cut the deficit 
to one with less than thirty 
seconds remaining. 

Down by just one point, 
and in possession of the ball 
with twelve seconds 



BASKETBALL 



remaining, the Warriors 
attempted to run the shot 
clock down for the final shot 
at the buzzer. But senior 
captain Marybeth Torpey 
would have none of that. 

Torpey (11 points for the 
game) stole a pass that was 
destined for the wing with 
four seconds left in 
regulation, ending Foxboro' s 
comeback, and securing the 
Presidents a spot in the 
tournament's championship 
game against host Dedham 
HS. 

"We were down at the 
half, but it was a close game 
all the way through," said 
Quincy head coach Jeff 
Bretsch. "The team played a 
very good defensive game. 
We didn't shoot the ball all 
that well, but we did put 
together a nice run at the end 
with Tobin and Torpey both 
hitting three pointers to put 
us up six points. 

"Marybeth just made a 
great defensive play at the 
end and we hung on to win. 
That has been the way things 
have gone in all of our games 
so far. But with the large 
number of seniors that we 



have on the roster and our 
experience, we have been 
able to win three out of four 
games. We are doing real well 
in these types of games." 

Torpey 's co-captain, 
senior Meagan Tobin, led the 
way offensively for Quincy. 
Tobin finished the game with 
a team-high 1 7 points. Fellow 
senior Kathryn Carella 
scored seven points for the 
victors. 

In their Atlantic Coast 
League season opener against 
Nauset HS, it was Tobin who 
produced the magic scoring 
touch for the Presidents. 

With Quincy down 44-43 
after Nauset hit one-of-two 
free throws to take the lead, 
and the seconds ticking off 
the game clock, sophomore 
forward Colleen Tobin, 
Meagan' s sister, took an 
outlet pass and pushed the 
ball over half-court. She 
found her sister at the top of 
the key, and Meagan Tobin 
drilled a three-point basket 
at the buzzer, with two 
defenders in her face, to give 
the Presidents a big league 
win, 46-44. 

"It was pretty wild," said 



Bretsch. "We watched 
something we thought we had 
in hand evaporate in five 
seconds, and then for her 
(Tobin) to hit that three was 
just high drama." 

Meagan Tobin led all 
scorers with a game high 27 
points, none bigger than the 
final three. Senior captain 
Marybeth Torpey added 1 1 
points for Quincy. Together, 
Tobin and Torpey accounted 
for 38 of their team's 46 
points. 

Senior forward Kathryn 
Carella contributed with 
some productive minutes and 
big plays down the stretch. 

The Presidents got back 
into their Atlantic Coast 
League schedule yesterday 
(Wed.) against Plymouth 
North HS, and they are 
scheduled to travel to 
Plymouth South HS this 
Friday (Jan. 4), 

The team follows these 
two ACL away games with 
three consecutive league 
home games beginning Jan. 
8 against WTiitman-Hanson 
HS (6:30 p.m., East Gym). 
The will play Dennis- 
Yarmouth HS on Jan. 1 and 
against Sandwich HS on Jan. 
15. 



Quincy 's Dave Jaehnig 
MSAC Player Of Week 



Westfield State's Dave 
Jaehnig, a Quincy resident 
and a 2005 graduate of 
Boston College High School, 
was selected the 
Massachusetts State 

Athletics Conference Player 
of the Week for Dec. 9-16. 

Jaehnig, a 6-4 junior 
guard, scored a career-high 
27 points in the Owls' 72-5 1 
victory over Lesley College 
on Dec. 1 1 . He shot 7-for-9 
from the field, including 4- 
for-4 from three-point range, 
and had six rebounds. Jaehnig 
was also a terror on defense 
with two blocked shots and 
three steals in the win. 

Westfield' s State record 




QUINCY'S DAVE JAEHNIG 
scored a career-high 27 points 
in Westfleld State's 72-51 
victory at Lesley University. 

at the semester break is 6-3 
and the team's next game is 
on Jan. 4 against Mount Saint 
Vincent, NY. 



Sports 



Recreation Dept. Ice Skating 
Instruction Starts Jan. 9 



North Quincy Wins First Over Falmouth 



The North Quincy Red 
Raiders, off to an 0-3 start 
this year as they look to repeat 
as Atlantic Coast League 
North champions, finally got 
off the snide and earned their 
first victory of the season on 
Dec. 21 against Falmouth 
High School, 56-43. 

The Raiders (1-4, 1-1 in 
ACL play) were led to victory 
in this league game by senior 



forward Rebecca Goreham. 
Goreham posted 12 points 
and IS rebounds as she 
continues her assault on the 
school rebounding record 
(which she broke last year). 
Senior forward Kasey 
O'Connell and junior 
forward Catherine O' Connell 
each scored ten points each 
as the Raiders earned that 



elusive first victory of the 
winter. 

North Quincy played in 
the Notre Dame Academy 
Holiday Tournament last 
week (Dec. 28-29, results to 
follow in next week ' s Quincy 
Sun), and played last night 
(Jan. 2) against ACL foe 
Marshfield HS. 

The team is scheduled to 



host Nauset HS in an ACL 
game this Friday night at 6:30 
p.m. in the NQHS 
Gymnasium, and follows that 
home game with an away 
game versus Brockton HS 
on Jan. 6. 

The team will play at 
home on Jan. 8 against 
Plymouth North HS (6:30 
p.m.). 



Presidents Split Silver-Lake Series 



The Quincy Presidents, 
after splitting a home-and- 
away series with Silver Lake 
High School to begin the 
season, went 1-1 over the 
school vacation week. 

Quincy (2-2, 0-1 in ACL 
play) played its Atlantic 
Coast League opener on Dec . 
21 against Nauset HS, and 
lost aheartbreaker59-58. The 
team rebounded to that loss 
with a 67-46 non-league beat 
down of Randolph HS on 
Dec. 27 at QHS' East Gym. 

The Presidents played 



Randolph in a rematch on 
Dec. 29. (The Sun had an 
early deadline because of the 
New Year's hohday.) 

Against the Randolph 
Bulldogs, junior John Parry 
scored 13 of his 17 points 
after halftime to help the 
Presidents build on the six- 
point lead they held at the 
break. Parry connected twice 
from three-point range in the 
fourth quarter to put 
Randolph away. 

Quincy's sensational 
guard, Doug Scott, continued 



his early season scoring tear 
with 18 points to lead all 
President scorers, and 
forward Andy Boucicaut 
collected 1 2 rebounds for the 
winners. 

The win over Randolph 
helped ease the pain of the 
team's loss to ACL rival 
Nauset HS on Dec. 21. 

With two minutes to go in 
the third quarter, Quincy 
trailed by twenty points 
against Nauset before coming 
all the way back to take the 
lead on a Teddy Francis put- 



Quincy Youth Basketball Highlights 



Boys, Grades 6-8 
Alex Bottari (12 points) 
led Atty. George Burke to a 
season opening 43-30 win 
over Colonial Federal. 

Seamus Pound (10 pts.), 
William Chu (8 pts.), DJ 
Feliciano (6 pts.), John 
Yacano (4 pts.), Patrick 
Linnnane (2 pts.) and Tim 
Nazzaro (1 pt.) also scored 
for Atty. George Burke. 
Kevin Wu and Andrew 
Zheng play well. 

For Colonial Federal, 
Madison Barnwell and Nick 
Dolan score nine points each. 



Roche Brothers prevailed 
over Rep. Bruce Ayers 33- 
20. 

Daniel Mongo led all 
scorers with 14 points and 
Raymond Wong scored nine 
points as Roche Brothers won 
its opening game. Kyle 
Richardson and Andrew Bell 
also scored. 

For Bruce Ayers, Brendan 
Cunningham contributed six 
points and Keenan Daniels 
and Mike Haley each added 
two points apiece. 

Christ Church Quincy 
topped First Class 



Construction 44-22. 

For Christ Church 
Quincy, Leo Cleary had a 
game high 20 points. Padraig 
Geany scored 12 points, 
Brendan Moreira scored four 
points and James Guerin, 
Chris Ham and Stanley Cruz 
added two points apiece. 

Steve Quinn was the high 
scorer for First Class 
Construction with 12 points. 
Alan Chan added seven 
points, Jeff Nguyen (2 pts.) 
and Perry Chen (1 pt.) also 
scored. 



back with 1:32 remaining in 
the contest. Unfortunately, 
the Presidents could not hold 
on and lost 59-58 at home. 

Scott led all Quincy 
scorers with 20 points 
(including a tying basket late 
in the game). Parry 
contributed 1 1 points, with 
six of those points coming on 
a pair of late three-pointers, 
and Boucicaut added seven 
points and a team-high ten 
rebounds. 

Quincy played last night 
(Wed.) at home versus 
Plymouth North HS in an 
ACL showdown, and is 
scheduled to host ACL rival 
Plymouth South HS this 
Friday (Jan. 4) at 6:30 p.m. 

The Presidents have a 
tough league road game 
against Whitman-Hanson HS 
Tuesday (Jan. 8) at 6:30 p.m. 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department announced this 
week that its popular 
Instructional Ice-Skating 
Program will once again 
conduct its nine- week lesson 
program at the Quincy Youth 
Arena beginning on Jan. 9. 

The Learn to Skate 
program for boys and girls 
age 6-14, offers fundamentals 
of skating in a low cost 
program with quality 
instruction. 

The skating program will 
have two separate classes 
beginning at 3:10 p.m. and 
4:05 p.m. on Wednesdays 
starting Jan. 9. Both classes 
offer the same levels of 
instruction and run for nine 
weeks. 

Instruction will 

supervised by Mrs. Anne 
Eagles, a United States 



Figure Skating Association 
Professional, and will utilize 
the basic program of 
instruction designed by the 
U.S.F.S.A. 

Cost is $73 for the nine- 
week session, which includes 
instruction and ice time. 
Participants need to provide 
their own skates (either figure 
or hockey skates with a single 
blade). 

Registration will be done 
on a first-come-first-serve 
basis. Walk-in registration 
will take place at the QRD 
main office. One 
Merrymount Parkway, 
beginning immediately and 
will continue on weekdays 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. as long 
as openings exist. 

Additional information 
can be obtained by calling 
the QRD at 617-376-1394. 




Swim Lessons 

Red Cross Certifled 
All Levels Offered 

weekends still 

available 

Lincoln-Hancock Pool 

Call 617-298-0025 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 

Fundraising Committee 

Presents 

'THE PENALTY BOX" 

A Dance Open To M 

Middle School Children 

LOCATION 

First Church Hall Of Squantum 

E. Squantum St., Right On Huckins Ave., Top Of 

$12 tickets sold at the door 

Saturday, January 5, 2008 
. , .^IMjim - 10:00pra,^,, 




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Ecumenical Epiphany Service Sunday 
At Sacred Heart Catholic Church 



Parent Advisory Council To Special Ed 
Meets Jan. 15 At Sterling Middle School 



The Interchurch Council 386 Hancock St., North 

of Wollaston and North Quincy. 
Quincy will host the 32nd The Quincy Choral Soci- 

annual "Feast of Lights" ety will lead the music and 

Epiphany Celebration Sun- local ecumenical clergy will 

day. Jan. 6 at 7 p.m. at Sa- lead prayer and reflection, 
cred Heart Catholic Church, Refreshments and fellow- 



ship will follow the service. 
All are invited to attend. 

For more information, 
contact the Rev. John 
O'Brien, pastor of Sacred 
Heart Church, 617-328- 
8666. 



The Quincy Parent Advi- The meeting will focus on 

sory Council to Special Edu- parent issues and preparing 

cation (QPAC to SPED) will for the quarterly meeting 

meet Tuesday, Jan. 15 from with the School Committee. 

5 to 8 p.m. at the Sterling The public is welcome and 

Middle School Cafeteria, encouraged to attend. 

444 Granite St., Quincy. For more information 



about QPAC to Special Edu- 
cation, contact Linda Perry 
at 617-77-1385 or by e-mail 
LperryOl 8 1 @comcast.net. 

To be added to QPAC's 
email list, email the address 
qpacsped@comcast.net. 



Catholic Women's Prayer Group 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



The Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church, 310 
Manet Ave., Quincy, 
Epiphany Sunday service 
will be held at 9:30 a.m. 

Pastor John Castricum 



will deliver his sermon 
"Gifts of Christmas: The 
Wise Men" ba.sed on scrip- 
ture Matthew 2: 1-12. He 
will present the sacrament of 
Communion. 



The Quincy Catholic Jan. 15 from 7 to 8:15 p.m. shared by those who gather. 

Women's Prayer Group in- at St. Joseph Rectory. For more information, 

vites the public to join in The group will be using contact Sister Pat Boyle at 

Fellowship coffee hour prayer on the third Tuesday the prayer method of Lectio 617-479-5400 or Dorothy 



will follow the service. 

The Church Council 
meets Monday at 7 p.m. in 
the Gordon Room. 

Choir rehearsals resume 
Wednesday at 7 p.m. 

Winter Storytimes Registration Jan. 11 

Registration for Winter rently attending storytimes one story time and must be of 



of every month. 

The next gathering will be 



Divina where Sacred Scrip- Ruggiero at 617-472-6321. 
ture is read, reflected on and 



Temple Shalom To Screen 
'Rashevski's Tango' Jan. 5 



Storytimes and lilementary 
Itxplorations will begin Fri- 
ilay. Jan. II, at 9 a.m. at the 
rhoMKis Oane Public Li- 
brary. 40 Washington St. 

Youngsters ages four 
months to seven vears enr- 



age at the first meeting. 
For program details, pick 



are asked to wait until Satur- 
day. Jan. 12, to register to 
allow as many kids as pos- 
sible to participate. 

Registration is limited to 
Quincy residents only. Each thomascranelibrary.org. 
child may register for only 



"Rashevski's Tango," a 
film that asks the question, 
"What does it mean to be 
Jewish?" will be the featured 
film at Movie Night at 



up a schedule at any library Temple Shalom of Milton, 



location or check the library 
website at http:// 



180 Blue Hill Ave., Satur- 



day, Jan. 5 at 7 p.m. ing for $3 per person, two for 

The event, hosted by $5. Non-members price is $5 

Temple members Ronit and each, two for $8. Tickets can 

Herb Voigt, is open to the be purchased at the door or 

public. get free popcorn by reserv- 

Temple members can pur- ing tickets in advance at 6 1 7- 

chase tickets to the screen- 698-3394. 



Bethany Congregational Church 



Calligraphy Demo At Library Jan. 8 



Bethany Congregational vice and preach a sermon 



l.ai Wong will lead a prt)- 
grani in the basics of callig- 
raphy Tuesday, Jan. 8, from 
2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 40 



Washington St. 

Students in grade 5 to 12 
will have a chance to try out 
various styles of writing, 
pans and paper in the large 



meeting room of the main li- 
brary. 

For more information, 
stop by or call the Children's 
Room at 617-376-2411. 



Church, 1 8 Spear St., Quincy 
Center, will have a Worship/ 
Communion Service and 
Church School at 10 a.m. 

The Rev. William C. 
Harding will conduct the ser- 



entitled "What Is A Real 
Christian." 

Childcare is available for 
infants and toddlers. 

Following the worship 
service, there will be fellow- 



ship time in the Allen Parlor. 
Light refreshments will be 
served. 

All are welcome. 

The church is handi- 
capped accessible. 



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QIadT idinas 

158 Wishlngion St., Quincy 

phone: 77^-9797 

Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

|Youth & Children's Ministry 
A»Contemporary Worship 
mm 'Marriage & Family Croup 
■I •International Fellowship 



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Catliolic 



SERVICES & ACTIVITIES 



iti<»ial 



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Catholic 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St.. Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday. 4pm. Sunday 7. 9:30 

& 11:30am. Weekdays 9am 

HandKapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



Ui^tai^iB Universidists 



UNITED FIRST PARISH CHURCH 
1306 Hancock Street 

Quincy. MA 02169 

617-773-1290 

www.ufpc.org 

We are a welcoming Congregation 




First Church of Squantum 

164 BeHevue St. • 617-328-6649 

Pastor: Michael S. Robertson 

Co-Pastor Dr. Emmy Robertson 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

All Are Welcome 



Sacred Heart Church 

"A Roman Catholic Community walking together 

in Faith. Worship. Education and Sen/ice" 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7;45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 9am 
CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 WasNngton St . • 617-773-S424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



To Advertise 

in this Directory, 

Call 61 7-471 '3 100 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., 
Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday (Vigil Mass) 4 p.m. 

SufKJay 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m. 
emd 1 1 a.m. (Family Liturgy) 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 

Handicapped Accessible 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 
617-479-8778 • www.hncong.org 

Worship Service and 
Sunday School at 9:30 am 

'Gifts of Christmas: The Wise Men' 
Epiphany Sunday 

Rev. John Castricum 




Saint Ann's Ct)urch 

7S7 Hnoock SL, WoImIoii 

•t1747»«400 

Pastor Rev. John J. Rona^^ian 

WMkand Mass Schedule: 

Sahjrday 4:00 PM 
SuwJay 7:00. 9:00. 1 1 :30AM 

0^ Manoo: 9:00 AM 
Haniac^)$)mt Ctmirm Av 



Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 

Speai & Coddington Streets 

Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

10 a.m. Worship/Conununion 

Service and Church School 

Rev. William C. Harding 

'What Is A Real Christian' 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 

Following Worship Service 

Wheelchair Accessible 



First Gkwrcli of 
Ckrist, Sciciktist 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

United Church of Christ 

48 WinthropAve. ■ 617-773-7432 

Pastor: Rev. Mary Lou Gifford 

Sunday Worship at 10 a.m. 

Rev. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Preaching 

Sermon Title: 'Another Dream' 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts., Quincy 

(617) 472-0737 • www.stchrysostoni.coni 

Rev. David Hefling 

Sunday Eucharist 10 a.ni. 

Sunday School 9:30 a.ni. 

Wednesday Eucharist 8:30 a.ni. 

Nursery Care during Service 

Coffee Hour Following 

ALL WELCOME 

THRIFT SHOP hours W, Th, Fr. 10-4 




UNION CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.,Woilaston 

(617)479-6661 

Sunday Worship Sen/ice 

10 AM 
Rev. John Swanson, Pastor 



EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF ATLANTIC 
65 Newbury Ave. North Quincy 

(617) 847-4444 • 

Interim Pastor Wayne Earl 

10:30 Sunday Worship 

Sermon: 'Sermons Is Directions' 

7PM Brazilian A/G Service 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

50 Huckins Ave., Squantum 

617-773-5878 • Pastor Mike Fehan 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. • Gospel of Matthew 

Children's Class 10 a.m. 

Bible Discussion Group Wed. 7:45 p.m. 

Handicap Accessible 

email: inf0@squantumcf.or9 




Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene i 

37 E. Elm Av«., Wollaston A 
(617)472-5669 M 
On Th* Campus Of yy^.^ 
Eaat*m Nazarana Collaga 

Pastor: Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sundav Services 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am ■ Adult & Children's 

Sunday School 

1 1 a.m. - Blended Worship Sennce 

Come Worship with Us! 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr. Susan Jarel(-Glidden, Pastor 



A 



ItiSOAM 
7t3«PM 




20 GrcMdaaf Strcat Qaucy 

oCr Haatcodt St. 

617-472-6655 



r^--^ 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 61 7-472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



GOOD SHEPHERD 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

308 West Squantum Street 

No. Quincy, MA 02171 

617-328-8348 

The Rtv. Nathan D. PIpho 

10:30 a.m. Holy Communion Sunday 
6:30 pm Wednentay NigM B»M Study, Fetowship 



Thursday, January 3, 2008 



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O 2007 King Features Synd.. Iik. 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOFF 




Find at least six differences in details t)etween panels. 




6 The 
araen 





Plant your live evergreen as a wind- 
break for the landscape, or use 
Beyond boughs from a cut 
holidays tree as protection 
from cold for your 
garden plants. They can 
later be recycled through 
the compost pile or 
shredded and used for 
mulching. 




UNITED STATES 

MAGIC MAZE % savings 

BONDS 

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O2007 King FMturM Synd., Inc. World rights rMervad. 




Trivm 

Jest torn I 

Rodnguez 



1. ASTRONOMY: How 
many major stars make up 
the Big Dipper? 

2. GEOGRAPHY: The 
tiny country of Djibouti lies 
on which continent? 

3. POLITICS: Which 
leader of a foreign govern- 
ment has the nickname "El 
Jefe Maximo"? 

4. BUSINESS: What com- 
pany produced the Frisbee? 

5. INVENTIONS: When 
was the transistor invented? 

6. LITERATURE: What 
was the name of the attorney 
introduced in a series of 
books by Erie Stanley Gard- 
ner? 

7. MEDICAL: What is the 
medical name of the condi- 
tion called "shingles"? 



King-Crossword 
4/isM'ers 



8. U.S. STATES: What is 
Wyoming's nickname? 

9. MEASUREMENTS: 
What is the closest metric 
equivalent to an acre? 

10. MOVIES: What actor 
provided the voice of 
Woody in the animated film 
"Toy Story"? 

Answers 

1 . Seven 

2. Africa 

3. Fidel Castro 
4.Wham-0 

5. 1947, Bell Telephone 
Laboratories 

6. Perry Mason 

7. Herpes zoster 

8. Equality State 

9. Hectare 

10. Tom Hanks 

G 2007 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Magic Maze 
— Answers — 



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Quincy Typewriter Service 

SALES - SERVia - RENTALS 

Bob Barker Gerry Barker 

WINTER SPECIAL 

IBM Selectrics Reconditioned 

Starting at $229<^ and up while they last! 

5 Maple Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 617-472-3656 



Sl.irs 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) It's a good time for 
reunions with those very spe- 
cial people from your past. 
You could be pleasantly sur- 
prised by what comes to light 
during one of these get- 
togethers. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) The new year gets off to 
an encouraging start for the 
Bold Bovine who takes that 
demanding workplace chal- 
lenge by the horns and steers 
it in the right direction. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) The clever Gemini will 
be quick to spot the telltale 
signs of workplace changes 
that could open up new 
opportunities for the right 
person. (And that's you, isn't 
it?) 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) The Moon Child's post- 
holiday letdown soon lifts as 
you begin to get back into 
your comfortable routine. 
Someone from your past 
extends a surprise bid to 
recormcct. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
You've been the ultimate 
social Lion over the holidays. 
Now it's time to relax and 
recharge your energy so you 
can be at your best when you 
pounce on that new project. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) A relationship 
could be moving in a direc- 
tion you might not want to 
follow. Step back for a better 
overview of the situation. 
You might be surprised at 
what you see. 



LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Emotions mle at 
the start of the week, affect- 
ing your perception about a 
decision. Best advice: Avoid 
conunitments until that good 
Libran sense kicks back in. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) A longtime 
friendship could take a 
romantic turn early in the 
new year. While this pleases 
your passionate side, your 
logical self might want to go 
slow. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem- 
ber 22 to December 21) 
Someone might make a sur- 
prising disclosure about a 
trusted friend or workplace 
colleague. Stay cool and 
reserve judgment until you 
get more facts. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 19) You might 
think you've found what 
you've been looking for. But 
appearances can be deceiv- 
ing. Don't act on your dis- 
covery until you know more 
about it. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 1 8) You 're no doubt 
anxious for that confusing 
situation to be cleared up. 
But don't press for a quick 
resolution or you might over- 
look some vital facts. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Now that your 
holiday distractions are eas- 
ing, you need to apply your- 
self to getting those unfin- 
ished tasks done so you can 
begin a new project with a 
clean slate. 

BORN THIS WEEK: 
People respect both your wis- 
dom and your deep sense of 
loyalty and compassion. 

O 2007 King Features Synd., Inc. 



*su!UJ \z :aui!i iioi)n|os 




Wishing 


1 


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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
nnessage every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell 
out your fortune. Count the letters hi your first name. If the 
numt)er of letters is 6 or more, subiract 4. If tf>e number is less 
than 6, add 3. The result is your key nunriber. Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

e 2007 King FaaluraG Synd., Inc. World rights reMrvad. 



PwKttl 



^timntaifvSmumryd^ SMM 



J 



ClBITIJAI^IES 




Barbara A. McLelland-Gouda 

Homemaker 

A funeral Mass for Bar- 
bara A. (Lombardo) 
McLeiland-Gouda, 66. of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, a homemaker. was 
celebrated Dec. 29 in Saint 
John the Baptist Church, 44 
School St.. Quincy. 

Mrs. McLelland-Gouda 
died Dec. 25 at home. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
raised in Quincy and attended 
Quincy sch(H)ls. 

She was a 1959 graduate 
of Quincy High School. She 
also received an associate 
degree from Quincy College. 

Mrs. McLelland-Gouda 
had lived in Quincy for most 
of her life before moving to 
Weymouth three yeiu^s ago. 

She had been an active 
member of Saint John the 
Baptist Church in Quincy and 
was a fornicr member of the 
Saint Joseph s Church Drum 
Sc Bugle Corps. 

She IS survived by a 
daiiehlcr, Georgia T. Ryan 
and hoi husband Irank o\ 



BARBARA 
McLKLLAND-GOUDA 

South Boston; two sons, 
Edmund James McLelland 
and his wife Lauren of 
Weymouth and Theophilus 
Mcl^lland IV of Weymouth; 
two sisters. Theresa F. Giglio 
of Plymouth and Georgia T. 
Foudy of Plymouth; six 
grandchildren and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in St. 
Michael's Cemetery. 
Koslindale. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
Quincy. 



Nikolaos G. Regas 



Trisagion services for 
Nikolaos Ci Regas (4 Quincy 
were held Dec. 26 in St. 
Catherine Greek Orthodox 
Church. 119 Common St.. 
Braintree. 

Funeral services and 
burial were to take place in 
Amfissa. Greece. 

Mr. Regas died Dec. 20. 

He was the husband of 
Kaliopi (Douka) Regas; fa- 
ther of George, Spiro, 
Paraskevi "Voula" Regas, 
Joanna Tsatsaklas and her 
husband Nicholas and 
Ekaterina "Kathy" Regas. 



He was also the brother of 
Spiro Regas and his wife 
Frederiki. Emilia Roumbakis 
and her husband Manolis and 
Demetra Regas and her hus- 
band Demetri. 

He is also survived by a 
grandson and many nieces, 
nephews, relatives and 
friends. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by Faggas Fu- 
neral Home, Watertown. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to St. Catherine 
Church Building Fund. 




A TkovetfT 

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George B. ^Buddy' McDonald 

Former Norfolk County Commissioner, 
Quincy City Councillor 



A funeral Mass for George 
B. "Buddy" McDonald, 85. 
of Quincy. a former long- 
time Norfolk County com- 
missioner and former Quincy 
city councillor, was cel- 
ebrated Monday in Saint 
Mary's Church. 95 Crescent 
St.. West Quincy. 

Mr. McDonald died Dec. 
26 at home after a brief ill- 
ness, surrounded by his lov- 
ing family. He died in the 
home which he had built in 
1957 and had lived in for 50 
years. 

Bom in Milton, he was 
raised in Quincy and was a 
lifelong Quincy resident. 

He was educated in 
Quincy schools and attended 
the University of Southern 
California. 

Mr. McDonald was 
keenly interested in civic af- 
fairs and followed in his 
father's footsteps by enter- 
ing politics in 1959. 

Mr. McDonald was a Nor- 
folk County commissioner 
tor 20 years. He was elected 
in 1968 and serxed until 1988. 
He had also served as 
Ward 4 city councillor from 
1960 to 1967 and as an at- 
large councillor from 1968 
to 1971. 

He had been retired for 
many years. 

Mr. McDonald was a dis- 
abled veteran of World War 
II serving in the Asiatic Pa- 
cific Theater with the U.S. 
Army. He was a member, 
past commander and histo- 
rian of the Cyril P. Morrisette 
American Legion Post #290 
in Quincy. 

Mr. McDonald was a life- 
long and faithful member of 
Saint Mary ' s Church in West 
Quincy. 

He enjoyed traveling and 
returned to Ireland several 
times on family vacations. 
He liked to make the rounds 
entertaining the local town 
folk in Irish pubs with songs 



Noreen M. Myers, 53 

Braille Professional 



GEORGE B. Mcdonald 

and poems. 

He is survived by his wife 
of 59 years. Sheila J. 
(O'Mahoney) McDonald, 
formerly of Killamey, Ire- 
land; his children. Colleen 
A. Haley and her husband 
Tim of Quincy, Eileen E. 
Teixeira and her husband 
Tony of Scituate; four broth- 
ers, John Richard McDonald 
of Oakdale, CT, James G. 
McDonald of Hingham, Tho- 
mas P. McDonald of Quincy 
and John M. McDonald of 
Braintree; two sisters, Noreen 
M. Curtis of Braintree and 
Ann E. Erickson of Quincy; 
three grandchildren and one 
great-grandchild and many 
nieces and nephews. 

He was the father of the 
late Erin P. McDonald. 

He was also the son of the 
late George P. McDonald, 
former Ward 4 Quincy city 
councillor, the late Hazel 
(Bryan) McDonald and the 
late Mary (Connolly) 
McDonald. 

Interment with military 
honors was at Saint Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Saint Mary's 
Church Building Fund, c/o 
95 Crescent St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



A funeral Mass for Noreen 
M. (Clancy) Myers, 53, of 
Quincy, a Braille profes- 
sional, was celebrated Dec. 
22 at Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Myers died Dec. 14 
at home. 

Bom, raised and educated 
in Quincy, she was a lifelong 
resident of Houghs Neck. 

She worked for 10 years 
as a Braille professional, as- 
sisting blind students in the 
Quincy Public Schools. 

In her spare time, she vol- 
unteered for Meals on Wheels 
and spent time in her garden. 

Mrs. Myers was a bird 
watcher and reported her 
sightings to The Patriot 
Ledger's bird watcher col- 
umn. 

She also enjoyed games 
and writing children's sto- 
ries. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Daniel Myers; her 
daughter. Jennifer L. Linskey 
and her husband Joseph of 
Weymouth; two sons, Phihp 
J. Myers and Daniel A. 
Myers, both of Quincy; and 




Richard 



NOREEN M. MYERS 

three sisters, Arlene Firm of 
Bridgewater, Kathleen E. 
Clancy-Almazol of 

Martinez, C A and Maryellen 
Steen of Quincy. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy, 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Myers Family 
Trust, c/o Quincy Credit 
Union, 100 Quincy Ave., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

R. Towie 



College Professor, CPA 

A funeral Mass for Rich- served as a lieutenant aboard 



ard R. Towle of Quincy, for- 
merly of Norwell and 
Hingham, a college profes- 
sor and certified public ac- 
countant, was celebrated 
Dec. 27 in Saint Paul's 
Church, Hingham. 

Mr. Towle died Dec. 23. 

Husband of the late Dor- 



the Aircraft Carrier U.S.S. 
WASP CV-18 in the Pacific 
which received nine battle 
stars. Lt. Towle received the 
Purple Heart and a Captain's 
Conmiendation. 

Mr. Towle obtained his 
bachelor' s degree in accoimt- 
ing. He was a professor at 



othy L. (Kannaly) Towle, he Boston University for /nore 

is survived by nine children, than 42 years. 
Richard R. Towle, Jr. of He was also a certified 

Marlborough, Douglas C. public accountant for Panell, 

Towle of Chicago, IL; Detra Kerr & Foster in Boston for 

R. Towle of Braintree, more than 40 years. 
Doretha L. Gurry of He was a member of the 

Marshfield, Deborah C. American Institute of CPAs 

DesChamps of CT, Rita C. and the Mass Society of 

Mohr of Braintree, Dayle CPAs. 
Nash of Marshfield, Thomas Most of all, Mr. Towle 

H. Towle of FL, and Steven loved his family and cher- 

J . Towle of Hngham; a sister, ished time spent with them, 
Mary Kane of Maine; 28 Funeral arrangements 

grandchildren and 26 great- were made by the Pyne 




Arrangements 
Living Beauty 



326 FRANKUN STREET. QUINCY ♦ 617-479-2020 



grandchildren. 

He was also the brother of 
the late Philip Towle. 

Mr. Towle served in the 
U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1945 
during World War II. He 



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CMJINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

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Keohane Funeral Home, 21 
Emerald St., Hingham. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Catholic Chari- 
ties, 75 Kneeland St., 8th 
Floor, Boston, MA 0211. 



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Thursday,J«Ruary 3s 2008 Tlie Qiftinosr £l«ui Page 23 



Alexander A. Hutton, 66 

Retired Yellow Cab Driver 

Funeral services for 
Alexander A. "Sandy" / 
"Scotty" Hutton, 66, of 
Quincy, a retired cab driver, 
were conducted Dec. 27 at 
the Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church, 444 Washing- 
ton St., Quincy. 

Mr. Hutton died Dec. 21 
at home after a brief illness. 

He was bom, raised and 
educated in Port Glasgow, 
Scotland. He immigrated to 
the United States in 1 965 and 
had lived in Quincy ever 
since. 

Mr. Hutton was a well- 
known cab driver for the 



Judith H. Deane, 70 

Homemaker, Artist 



Phyllis Tenny' Lowry, 57 

Vice President Of Grand Circle Corp. 





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ALEXANDER A. HUTTON 

a brother, Stewart Hutton of 
Torquay, England; and many 



Yellow Cab of Quincy for 37 nieces and nephews. 



years. He retired in 2004. 

He was a former member 
of Clan MacGregor. He en- 
joyed watching sports, espe- 
cially the Boston Red Sox 
and professional golf. 

He is survived by his wife 
of 37 years, Dorothy A. 
(Lawton) Hutton; a son, Wil- 



Interment was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Caritas Good 



Funeral services for Judith 
H. (Moreau) Deane, 70, of 
Newton Junction, N.H., for- 
merly of Wellfleet and 
Quincy, a homemaker and 
self-employed artist, were 
held Dec. 28 at the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quinkcy. 

Mrs. Deane died Dec. 26 
at the Lahey Clinic Hospital 
in Budington after a long ill- 
ness. 

Bom in Norwich, CT, she 
was raised in Quincy and at- 
tended Quincy schools. She 
was a graduate of Quincy 
High School. 

She had lived in Wellfleet 
and Quincy before moving 
to Newton Junction, N.H., 




JUDITH 11. DEANE 

3 1 years ago. 

She is survived by her 
husband of 41 years, Edward 
F. Deane and a son, Michael 
R. Deane of N.H. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Memorial doantions may 
be made to a charity of choice . 



Mary C. Kane, 83 

Administrative Assistant 




liamJ. Hutton of Brighton; a Samaritan Hospice, 310 
sisterMurielForbushandher Allston St., Brighton, MA 
husband William of Quincy; 02 1 35 . 

Rosemary C. Sheedy, 86 

Secretary For The Pentagon 

A funeral Mass for Rose- 
mary Christine (Merline) 
Sheedy, 86, of Quincy, a 
former secretary at the Pen- 
tagon, was celebrated Dec. 
29 in Saint John the Baptist 
Church, 44 School St., 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Sheedy died Dec, 1 8 
suddenly at her home. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
raised and educated in 
Dorchester and was a gradu- 
ate of Dorchester High 
School. She had lived in 
Dorchester until moving to 
Quincy in 1968. 

She worked as a secretary 
at the Pentagon in Washing- 
ton, D.C. During Worid War 
II, she was an active volun- 
teer for the United Service 
Organizations of Dorchester. 

She was a dedicated 
mother and grandmother. She 
enjoyed cooking and read- 
ing. 

Wife of the late John J. 
Sheedy, she is survived by 
five sons, John T. Sheedy of 
Newbury, James G. Sheedy 
and his wife Robin of N.C., 
Robert P. Sheedy and his wife 
Joan of CT, Richard C. 



ROSEMARY C. SHEEDY 

Sheedy and his wife Patrice 
of Beverly; and Thomas C. 
Sheedy and his wife Ginny 
of Norwell; two brothers, 
Mark MerUne of Hingham 
and Charles Merline of 
Franklin; a sister, Martha 
Merline of FL; nine grand- 
children and many nieces and 
nephews. 

Interment was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the American Red 
Cross of MA Bay, 1 39 Main 
St., Cambridge, MA 02142. 



A funeral Mass for Mary 
C. (Mullin) Kane, 83, of 
Quincy, formerly of 
Dorchester, a retired admin- 
istrative assistant, was cel- 
ebrated Dec. 29 at Sacred 
Heart Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Kane died Dec. 25 at 
home. 

Bom in Charlestown, she 
had lived in Dorchester be- 
fore moving to Quincy 32 
years ago. 

She was employed as an 
administrative assistant with 
the Department of Mental 
health for 20 years. She re- 
tired in 1992. 

Wife of the late Patrick F. 
"Frank" Kane, she is survived 
by a daughter, Maureen K. 
Bumiller of Hopkinton; two 
sons, Frank J. Kane of Cam- 



bridge and Thomas J. Kane 
of Quincy ; five brothers, John 
Mullin of South Boston, 
James MuUin of San Anto- 
nio, TX, Patrick Mullin of 
Dorchester, Thomas Mullin 
of Dorchester and Gregory 
Mullin of Easton; and two 
grandchildren. 

She was the sister of the 
late Luke Mullin and the late 
Daniel Mullin. 

Interment was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made made to Boston 
Cathohc TV, P.O. Box 9 1 96, 
34 Chestnut St., Watertown, 
MA 02471. 



A funeral service for 
Phyllis "Penny" (Snow) 
Lowry, 57, of Quincy, vice 
president of Grand Circle 
Corporation in Boston for 
more than 1 years, was held 
Dec. 29 at the Deware Fu- 
neral Home, 576 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Mrs. Lowry died Dec. 21 
unexpectedly at home after a 
lengthy illness. 

Born and raised in 
Dorchester, she was a gradu- 
ate of Dorchester High 
School. 

She had lived in Quincy 
for 35 years. 

Mrs. Lowry was a mem- 
ber of the Quincy Elks. 

She loved traveling and 
had visited all seven conti- 
nents. Shealsoenjoyedcook- 
ing and spending time with 
her granchildren. 

She is survived by her 
husband of 38 years, Walter 



J. Lowry, Sr.; six children, 
Joe W. Lowry of Quincy, 
Walter J. Lowry, Jr. of Bos- 
ton, Brian D. Lowry of Chi- 
cago, John K. Lowry of 
Rockland, Annmarie 
Miranda of Boston and Caryn 
J. Wahl of Arizona; a brother, 
Edward J. Snow of Quincy; a 
sister. Norma J. Leonard of 
Quincy; 1 1 grandchildren, 
one great-grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

She was also the sister of 
the late James F. Snow and 
the late Frederick A. Snow. 

Burial will be private at a 
later date. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Elks Founda- 
tion, BPO Elks of the USA, 
2750 N. Lakeview Ave., 
Chicago, IL 606 14- 1 889 and/ 
or The Arthritis Foundation, 
ATTN: Donation Dept, P.O. 
Box 96280, Washington, DC 
20077. 



Victoria A. Brancaccio, 25 

NQHS Graduate, Artist 



Kevin M. Maldonado 

Science Teacher 



Pamela D. DeMarco, 48 



A memorial service for 
Pamela D. DeMarco, 48, of 
Sanford, Maine, formerly of 
Quincy, will be held Satur- 
day, Jan. 12 at 11 a.m. at 
Saint John the Baptist 
Church, 44 School St., 
Quincy Center. 

Miss DeMarco died un- 
expectedly Dec. 14 in her 
home in Sanford, Maine. 

Bom in Boston on Oct. 
1 1, 1959 to Patricia Cardarelli 
and the late Donald 
DeMarco, she grew up in 
Quincy. She had also lived in 
Keene, N.H., before moving 
to Maine. 

Miss DeMarco was best 
known for her infectious 
laughter, her artistic talents, 
her Italian cooking, and pri(fe 



in her Italian heritage. 

She loved and was de- 
voted to her family, friends 
and animals. 

She is survived by her 
mother, Patricia Cardarelli; 
her brothers, Scott DeMarco, 
Andrew Cardarelli and wife 
Maureen, Joseph Cardarelli 
and wife Sibyl, all originally 
from Quincy; a niece, Marisa 
Cardarelli and a nephew, Jo- 
seph CardareUi, Jr. 

A reception will follow 
the memorial service at the 
Neighborhood Club of 
Quincy. 27 Glendale Rd., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the ASPCA hon- 
oring Pamela's great love of 
animals. 



A private funeral service 
for Kevin M. Maldonado of 
North Quincy and Scituate, a 
science teacher at North 
Quincy High School for the 
past four years, was held Dec . 
27 at the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Mr. Maldonado died Dec. 
23. 

He was also the former 
business owner of Accucomp 
Inventory Services in 
Watertown for many years 
and worked for the Carey 
Limousine Services in 
Braintree. 

Mr. Maldonado was an 
avid sports fan. He also en- 
joyed traveling and made 
several trips to Italy. 

He cherished spending 
time at his home in Scituate. 



He is survived by his wife, 
Maria D' Arcangelo of North 
Quincy and Scituate; his 
mother, Marilyn J. (Curran) 
Maldonado of New Jersey; a 
dear friend, Larry Seiler of 
Florida; and many aunts, 
uncles, nieces and nephews. 

He was also the brother of 
Irene and her husband 
Michael Firestone, Catherine 
Maldonado, Vincent 
Maldonado and his fiancee 
Linda Mulhgan, Theres and 
the late Frank Long, Caroline 
and Michael Lopez, all of 
New Jersey. 

He was the son of the late 
Rafeal A. Maldonado. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to St. Jude's 
Children's Research. P.O. 
Box 50, Memphis, TN 
38105. 



A funeral service for 
Victoria A. Brancaccio, 25, 
of Quincy, a gifted artist, was 
held Dec. 20 in the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Miss Brancaccio died un- 
expectedly Dec. 12 at home. 

Bom in Plymouth, she 
moved to Quincy when she 
was nine. 

She graduated from North 
Quincy High School and was 
attending art school at 
Massasoit College. 

She enjoyed drawing and 
was a very gifted artist. Some 
of her artwork was displayed 
at The Fuller Museum of Art 
and at Borders. 

Miss Brancaccio was ac- 
tive in the conmiunity volun- 
teering at WGBH and vari- 
ous other organizations. 



Daughter of the late 
Gaetano J. Brancaccio, she 
is survived by her mother, 
Catherina A. (Jones) 
Brancaccio of Quincy; three 
sisters, Cathy Brancaccio and 
Christina Brancaccio, both of 
Quincy and Angelique 
Brancaccio of Worcester; 
two brothers, Gaetano 
Brancaccio and Anthony 
Brancaccio, both of 
Weymouth; her longtime 
companion, Steven E. Cayon 
of Quincy; and many nieces, 
nephews, aunts and uncles. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Massasoit 
Conmiunity College Foun- 
dation, c/o the Victoria 
Brancaccio Scholarship, 1 
Massasoit Blvd., Brockton, 
MA 02302. 



Other Obituaries On Pages 24, 25 



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THE DOLAN F.^MILV 
VV. Craig 
Paul F. 
Frederick ). 
Courtney 



■4>' VV \SHi\c;ro\ siKttr 

IKiKCHtSTtK VIA •}Z\1\ 

4e>0 GRANITE WfcNLh 
MILTON, MA0:iSp 



Page 



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ttvu^ Thondajr, Janoarjr 3, 20(W 



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Alfred A. DiT\illio, 86 

Pipefitter, WWII Army Veteran 



James E. Lydon 

WWn Navy Veteran 



A funeral Mass for Alfred 
A. DiTullio. 86. of 
Marshfield. formerly of 
Quincy. a retired pipefitter 
and Army veteran of World 
War II. was celebrated Dec. 
29 in St. Christine's Church, 
Marshfield. 

Mr.DiTulliodiedDec.24 
at the home of his daughter, 
Mary DiTullio-Oliva, in the 
comfort of immediate fam- 
ily members. 

Bom in Quincy. he gradu- 
ated from Quincy High 
SchiH)l and enlisted in the 
Army. He served during 
World War H and was 
wounded in action in the pro- 
cess of eradicating enemy 
forces from the countryside 
ot st)uthem Irancc. He re- 
ceived the Purple Heart for 
nulitar\ merit 

While in the service. Mr. 
DiTullio married his high 
schtH)) sweetheart. Mary T. 
Marani ot Quincy. 

He lo\eil the St>uth Shore 
ami li\ed in Quincy S5 of his 
Hti years. 

He was employed as a 
pipefiller t\>r Bethlehem 
Steel/Cicneral Dynamics at 
the Quincy Shipbuilding Di- 

LEGAL NOTICE 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 06P0294AD 

Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To the persons interested 
in the estate of KARL H. 
HOLL late of QUINCY, in the 
county of NORFOLK, 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the r AND FI- 
NAL account (s) of JOHN C. 
TAXIARCHiS as ADMINIS- 
TRATOR (the fiduciary) of the 
Will of said deceased for the 
benefit of ADMINISTRATOR 
has t>een presented to this 
Court tor allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account (s). you or 
your attorney must file a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court 
at Canton on or t>efore ttie 
10TH day of JANUARY. 08 
tf>e retum day of this citation. 
You may upon written re- 
quest by registered or certi- 
fied mail to tfie fiduciary, or 
to tt>e attorney of the fidu- 
ciary, obtain without cc^ a 
copy of said account (s). If 
you desire to object to any 
item of said account (s). you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appeararK« as afore- 
said, tile within thirty days 
after said retum day or witfwi 
such other tinne as the Court 
upon motion may order a 
written statement of each 
such item together with tie 
groiffKte tor aach objactk>n 
tfiereto. a copy to be served 
upon the fiduciary pur«jant 
to Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS. DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
FIRST JUSTICE of said 
Court at Canton tfus 28TH 

NOVEMBER. 07. 
MTMCICW. 



1/3^D6 



vision. 

After his retirement, he 
enjoyed sharing his summer 
home in Falmouth with fam- 
ily and friends and wintering 
with relatives and friends in 
Port Charlotte. Fla. 



A funeral Mass for James 
E. Lydon of Quincy, a Navy 
veteran of World War 11, was 
celebrated Dec. 28 in Saint 
Aim's Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. Lydon died Dec. 25. 

He had lived in Hanson 



He is survived by his wife for more than 30 years be- 

of 64 years, Mary (Marani) fore moving to Quincy nine 

DiTullio; his children, years ago. 
Dianne Caristi-Keough, He served in the U.S. 

Cynthia Christmas, Mary Navy from 1943 to 1945. 



N 



DiTullio-Oliva. all of 
Marshfield, Dennis DiTullio 
of Grafton, and Joanne 
LeBlanc of Abington; 12 
grandchildren and 10 great- 
grandchildren and nieces and 
nephews. 

He was the son of the late 
Irank and Lucy (DiSalvo) 
DiTullio of Quincy and the 
brother of the late Marie 
Chella and Arthur DiTullio. 

Intennent was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery. 

luneral arrangements 
were made by the 
Mac Donald Funeral Home, 
Marshfield. 

Memorial contributions 
can be made to the South 
Shore Visiting Nurses Assn.. 
P.O. Box 859060. Braintree. 
MA 02 185-9060. 

Virginia M. 
Joyce, 77 

Office Manager 
For Gillette Co. 

A funeral Mass for Vir- 
ginia M. Joyce. 77. a retired 
office manager, was cel- 
ebrated Dec. 27 in the Im- 
maculate Conception 
Church. East Weymouth. 

Miss Joyce died Dec. 23. 

Bom in Boston, she had 
lived in Hingham for the past 
30 years. 

She was employed 45 
years as an office manager 
for the Gillette Co. in South 
Boston. She retired in 1994. 

She w as a member of the 
Propavalas Club started by 
the late Cardinal Cushing. 

Miss Joyce was an avid 
bowler and enjoyed the the- 
atre. 

Daughter of the late Jo- 
seph and Mary (Regan) 
Joyce, she is survived by four 
sisters. Dorothy Joyce of 
Hingham. Mary McCarthy of 
Illinois, Ann Flaherty of 
Milton and Helen Haughey 
of New Hampshire; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

She was the sister of die 
late Josci* Joyce. 

Intennent was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by ttie McDonald 
Funeral Home. South 
Weymouth. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Alzheimer's As- 
sociation of Eastern MA, 36 
Cameron Ave., Cambndge, 
MA 02140-1 102. 




JAMES E. LYDON 



Mr. Lydon was a member 
of the South Boston Irish 
American ScKiety. the Castle Cemetery, Dorchester. 



Island AsstKiation, and the 
Quincy Elks. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Catherine (Greene) Lydon of 
Quincy; a sister, Eleanor 
Bailey of Norwell; and sev- 
eral nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Cedar Grove 



Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St.. Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Old Colony Hos- 
pice. 1 Credit Union Way, 
Randolph. MA 02368. 



Paul E. Pike, 81 

Welding Supervisor 



A funeral Mass for Paul 
E. Pike, 8 1 , of Quincy, a re- 
tired welding supervisor, was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. Pike died Dec. 25 at 
Radius Specialty Hospital. 
Quincy. 

Bom in Bangor. ME. he 
ser\'ed in the U.S. Navy from 
1944 to 1946. 

He worked as a welding 
supervisor for General Dy- 
namics shipyard in Quincy 
before retiring in 1986. He 
had previously worked in 
Bangor. ME and in Hingham. 
for a total of 40 years. 

Mr. Pike was a member of 
the American Legion Post in 
Braintree. 

He is survived by his wife. 



ton, Robert A. Pike of Quincy 
and Kenneth M. Pike of 
Quincy; a brother, Allen Pike 
of Las Vegas, NV; two sis- 
ters, Carolyn Williams of 
Quincy and PauUne Foley of 
Braintree; and seven grand- 
chi Idren and two great-grand- 
children. 

He was also the father of 
the late Richard Pike and the 
brother of the late Richard 
Pike and Doris Maloney. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the American 



Louise Pike of Quincy; three Lung Association of MA, 460 
sons. Paul E. Pike. Jr. of Bos- jotten Pond Rd., Suite 400, 

Waltham, MA 02451. 

Josephine M. Falzone 

Retired N.E. Telephone Co. Employee 



A funeral Mass for 
Josephine M. (Gangi) 
Falzone, a hfelong Quincy 
resident and retired telephone 
company employee, was cel- 
ebrated Dec. 28 in St. 
Jerome's Church, 

Weymouth. 

Mrs. Falzone died Dec. 
23 at the Harbor House in 
Hingham surrounded by her 
loving family. 

She was the wife of the 
late Samuel S. Falzone. 

Mrs. Falzone was the 
daughter of the late Louis 
and Vincenza (DiGiacomo) 
Gangi. 

She graduated from 



She is survived by a 
daughter. Dr. Joanne M. 
Falzone Cherubini, her hus- 
band, Peter J. and their chil- 
dren: Peter Samuel and Adam 
Robert of Weymouth; and 
one son, Paul A. Falzone, his 
wife, Ehzabeth and their chil- 
dren: Jordan Elizabeth and 
Samuel Joseph of Hull. 

She was the sister of 
Phyllis Arcese of Newton and 
the late Natale Gangi, 
Carmella Gaziano, Peter 
Gangi, Anna Gangi and 
Enrico Gangi. 

She is also survived by 
her sister-in-law, Irene Gangi 
of Hanover, and many nieces. 



Quincy High School and was nephews and friends, 
a former employee of the 
New England Telephone 
Cooaptoiy for 20 years. 

Mrs. Falzone was a fonner 
member of the Quincy 
Aragona Society and the St Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
Joseph's Qiurch Sodality. 116 Franklin St, Quincy. 



Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Bolea- 



CouncU On Aging Seeks Medical Gear To Loan 



The Council oo Aging is owner bat can be kMmed to 
seeking donitfkMK <^ medi- sometiBe else, 
cal equipment that is no The present highest prior- 
longer needed by the cuneni ity is given to bath tramfer 



lolanda S. Petrelli, 92 

Retired City Of Quincy Employee 

A funeral Mass for Retirees, 
lolanda S. (Faiella) Petrelli, She is survived by a son, 

92, of Quincy, a retired City Robert Petrelli and his wife 

of Quincy employee, was Beveriy of Weymouth; a 

celebrated Dec. 29 in Our daughter, Mary Lou Petrelli 



Lady of Good Counsel 
Church at Holy Trinity Par- 
ish, 227 Sea St., Quincy. 

Mrs. Petrelli died Dec. 22 
at Quincy Medical Center. 

She was the wife of the 
late Anthony Petrelli. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
the daughter of the late 



of Quincy; a sister, Evelyn 
Bizzozero of Penn; three 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

She was also the sister of 
the late Anita Scibelli and 
John Faiella. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 



Nunzio and Mary (Ardissino) Quincy. 
Faiella. Funeral arrangements 

She graduated from were made by the Bolea- 

Malden High Schcwl and was Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 

a retired employee for the 1 16 Franklin St., Quincy. 



City of Quincy for more than 
20 years. 

Mrs. Petrelli was a mem- 
ber of the Merry Shores As- 
sociation in quincy and a 



Memorial donations may 
be made to the Rotary Inter- 
national Foundation, c/o 
James Parker, Treasurer, 
Weymouth Rotary Club, 82 



memberofthe City of Quincy Broad St., Weymouth, MA 

02188. 

Leona Flannery 

Seamstress, Bank Teller 

A funeral Mass for Leona Shop as well as Jordan Marsh. 



(Dunphy) Flannery of 
Quincy, formerly of 
Dorchester and South Bos- 
ton, a retired seamstress and 
bank teller, was celebrated 
Dec. 28 in Gate Of Heaven 
Church, South Boston. 

Mrs. Flannery died Dec. 
24. 

Wife of the late John J. 
Flannery, she was the mother 
of John Flannery of Wichita 
Falls, TX, Joanne Brissenden 
of Brockton and Thomas 
Flannery of North 
Weymouth; six grandchil- 
dren, a great-grandchild and 
many nieces and nephews. 

She was predeceased by 
six brothers. 

Bom and raised in South 



Mrs. Flannery also 
worked as head teller at State 
Street Bank and then later 
worker in the accounting de- 
partment at Federal Reserve 
Bank. 

She enjoyed traveling 
with her late husband and 
then later with her friends, 
who were her bridesmaids, 
whom she remained close to 
all these years. 

She was a devoted mother, 
grandmother and great- 
grandmother. 

Mrs. Flaimery was a mem- 
ber of the Castle Island As- 
sociation. 

Burial was in Mount Hope 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 



Boston, she graduated from were made by the Keohane 
Gate of Heaven High School Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 



where she was the senior class 
president. 

She worked as a seam- 
stress at Mary Bums Bridal 



St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Odyssey 
Healthcare, 400 Blue Hill 
Dr., Westwood, MA 02090. 



Dorothy Mae Gambon 

Retired Medical Assistant 



Call the Coimcil at 617- 
376-1506. 



A funeral Mass for Dor- 
othy Mae (Heatley) Gambon 
of Quincy, a retired medical 
assistant, was celebrated Dec. 
24 at St. Gregory Church, 
Dorchester. 

Mrs. Gambon died Dec. 
20 at John Adams Health 
Care Center in Quincy. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
raised in Medford and had 
hved in Dorchester for 30 
years before moving to 
Quincy 20 years ago. 

Mrs. Gambon was a 1 95 1 
graduate of Medford High 
School. 

A retired medical assis- 
tant at Carney Hospital, 
Dorchester, she retired in 
1991 after 28 years of em- 
ployment. 

She is survived by her 
husband, William J. 
Gambon, Sr.; her children, 
Carol Smith and WUliam J. 
Gambon, Jr., both of Quincy ; 



Dottie McColgan of 
Dorchester, Kathleen Drago 
of Plymouth, Arline Cathcart 
of Brighton; her daughter- 
in-law, Janice Gambon* and 
13 grandchildren aJjq, two 
great-grandchildren. 

She was the mother of the 
late Deimis and Joan Gambon 
and grandmother of the late 
Jessica Lynn Gambon. 

She was predeceased by 
her sister, Marion Mortimer, 
and her brothers, Albert, 
Robert, Gordon and Gerald 
Heatley. 

Burial was in St. Joseph 
Cenjetery, West Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred D. 
Thomas Fimeral Home, 326 
Granite Ave., Milton. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Jessica Lyim 
Gambon Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund, 41 Carr Rd., 
Marshfield, MA 02050. 



Thursday, January 3, 20M Tiim Quinoy Sun Pa^ 25 



Thomas E. Maher, 60 

School Custodian 

A funeral Mass for Tho- «^^^ ^^^^ ^^ «^»^ "^P*^" 



mas E. Maher, 60, of Quincy, 
a custodian at the Bemazzani 
School in Quincy for many 
years, was celebrated Dec. 
28 in Holy Trinity Parish in 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
church, lOOOSea St., Quincy. 



ews. 

He was an avid sports fan 
and enjoyed following the 
Red Sox, Patriots, Celtics and 
Bruins. 

He was a veteran of the 
U.S. Army and was an active 



Peter G. 
Costello 

A funeral Mass for Peter 
G. Costello of Quincy, for- 
merly of Dorchester, a vet- 
eran of the U.S. Air Force, 
was celebrated Dec. 27 in St. 
Peter Church, Dorchester. 

Mr. Costello died Dec. 23. 

He was the son of the late 



Mr. Maher died suddenly member of the Houghs Neck j^^^p^ ^ ^^j ^^^^ j^ 



Dec. 19. 

He was the son of Dor- 
othy (Peecha) Maher of 
Quincy and the late Leo T. 
Maher, Sr.; brother of Dor- 
othy Grindstaff of Halifax. 
Sandra Wardinsky of South 
Boston, Edward Peecha of 
West Palm Beach, Fla., and 
the late Leo T. Maher, Jr. 

Mr. Maher is also survived 
by many nieces, nephews. 

Free Senior 
Medical Trips 

Medical transportation 
with curb to curb service 
Mondays through Fridays is 
provided at no cost to Quincy 
seniors. 

The service requires two 
weeks notice for trips, in- 
cluding those to Braintree 
Hospital, Camey Hospital, 
Milton Hospital and eight 
major hospitals in Boston. 

To request a trip, call 617- 
376-1242. 



WIKW^ffW 



:^'^^ 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Tkrial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3043EP 

In the Estate of 
FRANK H. FOSTER 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
November 27, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested In 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
DIANE PUTNAM of 
ASHBURNHAI^ In the 
County of WORCESTER or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed executor, 
named in the will to serve 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY I^UST 
FILE A yVRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

JANUARY 3Q.2QM. 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petitk>n, stating speclfk: 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notrce to the petitbner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, December 
20, 2007. 

MTRICK W. McDERIIOTT 
R«gist*r of Probata 

1/3/08 



(O'Brien) Costello. 

He is survived by his 
brother, Joseph P. Costello 
of Quincy. 

He was the nephew of the 



American Legion Post #380. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane late Nora Doherty. 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock Interment was in New 

St., Wollaston. Calvary Cemetery, Boston. 

Memorial donations may Funeral arrangements 

be made to the Houghs Neck were made by the Murphy 
American Legion Post #380, Funeral Home, 1020 



Dorchester Ave., Dorchester. 
Memorial donations may 
be mde to St. Peter Church, 
309 Bowdoin St., Dorchester, 
MA 02122. 



1116 Sea St., Quincy, MA 
02169, or to the Bemazzani 
School, 701 Furnace Brook 
Parkway, Quincy, MA 
02169. 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 

NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07D1604-DV1 

DIVORCE/SEPARATE 

SUPPORT SUMMONS 

BY PUBLICATION 

HANG MYNU TON. 

Plaintiff(s) 

VHOANG TAN IRAN. 

Defendant(s) 
To the above named 
Defendant(s): 

A Complaint has been pre- 
sented to this Court by the 
Plaintiff(s) HANG MYNU 
TON , seeking DIVORCE . 

An Automatic Restraining 
Order has been entered in 
this matter preventing you 
from taking any action which 
would negatively impact the 
current financial status of any 
party. Please refer to Supple- 
mental Probate Court Rule 
41 1 for more information. 

You are required to serve 
upon ATTORNEY VY H. 
TRUONG . whose address is 
985 DORCHESTER AV- 
ENUE. DORCHESTER. MA 
02125 . your answer on or 
before 3/20/08 . If you fail to 
do so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and adjudica- 
tion of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at FORENOON (1 0:00AM) ON 



-iMi^: 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The T^ial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P2839GI 

In the Matter 

Of DORIS EILEEN 

CAMPBELL 

Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 

OF GUARDIAN 
To DORIS EILEEN 
CAMPBELL of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK, her 
spouse, and heirs apparent 
or presumptive, a petition has 
been filed in the above cap- 
tioned matter alleging that 
said DORIS EILEEN 
CAMPBELL of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK is 
a mentally ill person and 
praying that JOHN DANIEL 
CAMPBELL of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK and 
ROY ROBERT CAMPBELL 
of MIDDLEBOROUGH in the 
County of PLYMOUTH or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed guardian, to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 



CANTON. 

WITNESS, DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN . Esquire, First 
Justrce of said Court at CAN- 
JQH this IZ^ day Decem- 
ber. 2007- 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of ProtMrte Court 
1/3, 1/10. 1/17/08 



JANUA RY 9. 2QM 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, November 
26, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/3/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-075 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 1 7 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 15, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street. 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of SAL BALSAMO for 
a FINDING to detemriine that the proposed front extension to 
the dwelling is not rTK)re detrimental to the neighbortKXXJ than 
the existing conditions in violation of Title 1 7 as amended 
Chapter 17.24.020.B.2 on the premises numbered 27 POST 
ISLAND ROAD. QUINCY. 

Martin Aiitens, Chairman 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 



Commonwrealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Tk-iai Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3037AD 

In the Estate of 
MARY T COONEY 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
July 21 , 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF ADMINISTRATOR 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that MARY T. 
MOORE of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed administrator of 
said estate to serve with cor- 
porate surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

JANUARY 30. 20Qe 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day December 
19, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/3/08 

ieoAtNano! 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3031EP 
In the Estate of 
ROBERT FRANK PETITTI 

Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
March 30, 1979 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested In 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
MARY L. PETITTI of MT 
VERNON in the State of 
WASHINGTON or some 
other suitable person be ap- 
pointed executor, named in 
the will to serve without 
surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
JANUARY 30. 2008 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day December 
19, 2007. 

PATRK:K W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/3/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-074 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 1 5, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor In the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of LY TRAN for a 
FINDING to legalize an existing two family dwelling in viola- 
tion of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.24.020.B.2 and a 
Variance for the parking in violation of Title 17, Chapter 
1 7.28.030. E. on the premises numbered 247 WEST STREET, 
QUINCY. 

Martin Alkens, Chaimian 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-073 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 1 5, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of JEAN INNOCENT 
for a FINDING to detemnine if the extension of the third floor 
living space is not more detrimental to the neighborhood than 
the existing conditions in violation of Title 17 as amended 
Chapter 17.24.020.B.2 on the premises numbered 148 
BROOK ROAD, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-072 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 1 5, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of SHIANG TA CHEN 
& LI-JUNE CHEN for a VARIANCE to pave more than 30% of 
the front yard setback in violation of Title 17 as amended 
Chapter 1 7.28.030.G on the premises numbered 60 NORTON 
ROAD, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens. Chairman 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-071 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 15, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street. 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of I.D. GRAPHICS 
GROUP - SCOTT CASHMAN for a SPECIAL PERMIT to 
erect three (3) banner signs for more than thirty (30) days In 
violation of Title 1 7 as amended Chapter 1 7. 32. 080. C (Ban- 
ner Signs) and Chapter 17. 32.080. U (Temporary Signs) on 
the premises numbered 2 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 07-070 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 1 5, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the applk^tion of NORMAN WONG 
for a VARIANCE to enclose the existing front porch in viola- 
tion of Title 1 7 as amended Chapter 1 7.20.040 (Dimensional 
Requirements) on the premises numbered 12 CHESTER 
STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chaimnan 
12/27/07. 1/3/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 06-070 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board ot 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 1 5, 2008, at 7: 1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall. 1 305 Hancock Street. 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the applrcation of Elizabeth Whittaker 
for a Finding to amend house plans previously approved in 
ZBA Case 06-070 in vK)latkDn of Title 1 7 as amended 1 7.24.020 
on the premises numbered 1 1 Bayfield Road, Quincy. 

Martin Aikens, Chaimian 
12/27/07, 1/3/08 



. ' 



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LEGAL NOTICE 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P2926CV 
In the Matter 
Of JAMES E WILLIAMS 
also known as 
JAMES WILLIAMS 
OtOUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF CONSERVATOR 
To JAMES E WILLIAMS 
also known as JAMES WIL- 
LIAMS of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK, his 
spouse, and heirs apparent 
or presumptive, a petitkjn has 
been filed in the above cap- 
tioned matter alleging that 
said JAMES E. WILLIAMS 
also known as JAMES WIL- 
LIAMS of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK, by rea- 
son of mental weakness, is 
unat)te to properly care for h«s 
property and praying that the 
FAMILY SERVICE ASSO- 
CIATION OF GREATER 
FALL RIVER. INC of FALL 
RIVER in the County of 
BRISTOL or some other suit- 
able person be appointed his 
conservator to serve without 
surety 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10 00AM) ON 

JA WWKRY 1B .2QW 

WITNESS HON DAVID 
H KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
First ,Mjstice of said Court at 
CANTON this day. DecefT^ier 
6,2007 

mTmCK W McOERMOTT 

wnim o> 



AUTOMOBILES 

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE 
RECEIVE FREE VACA- 
TION VOUCHER. Donate 
your vehicle receive free 
vacation voucher United 
Breast Cancer Foundation 
Free mammograms, 
Breast Cancer info 
www.ubcf.info FREE tow- 
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runners accepted. 1-888- 
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$1,000 SHOPPING 
SPREE. Donate Car. Max 
IRS Deduction. Any con- 
dition. Help Foster Kids, 
Free Quick Pick-up. No 
Papers OK, Espanol, 24/ 
7, 1-888-204-7534 



LEGAL NOTICE 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P2929GI 
In the Matter 

Of JACK HOLLOWAY 

Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF GUARDIAN 

To JACK HOLLOWAY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK, his spouse, and 
heirs apparent or presump- 
tive, a petition has t>een filed 
in the above captioned mat- 
ter alleging that said JACK 
HOLLOWAY of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK is 
a mentally ill person and 
praying that the FAMILY 
SERVICE ASSOCIATION 
OF GREATER FALL RIVER. 
INC of FALL RIVER in the 
County of BRISTOL or some 
other suitable person be ap- 
pointed guardian, to serve 
wrthout surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

MWUABY1g.2QW 

WITNESS. HON DAVID 
H KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day. December 
7.2007. 

FWmiCXW. McOCMMTT 



^/3m 



Gig! Cleaning Service 

Professional and canng 

To have your house clean will cost 

you much less than you think, 

Lt'B G»t R0ady 

Forth0Hollday$l 

To have your free estimates call 

617-501-8512 

gigihouseclea ner6hotmail.com 



We have good references!!! 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

617-471-3100 



HELP WANTED 



RETAIL SALES PERSON 

Full or Part Time 




1372 Hancock Street, Quincy 

617-471-3100 



We need 
you 



American Heart 
Association, 



f» 



MISCELLANEOUS 



BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY 

ALL CASH CANDY 
ROUTE. Do y>u earn 
$800 in a day? Your own 
local candy route. In- 
cludes 30 Machines and 
Candy All dr $9,995. 1- 
800-921-3949 

EDUCATION 

ATTEND COLLEGE 
ONLINE from home. 
Medical, business, parale- 
gal, computers, criminal 
justice. Job placement as- 
sistance. Financial aid and 
computer provided if quali- 
fied. Call 866-858-2121, 
wwvy/[0n|-ieTd9iA€iBr1echjcxxn 

HELP WANTED 

Our top regional driver 
made $78,329 in 2007! 
How much did YOU earn? 
$.54 per mile? Make more 
in 2008! Home weekly! 
HEARTLAND EXPRESS 
1-800-44 1-4953 
www.heartlanciexpress.oom 

A Surrogate Mother 
Wanted: Established Sur- 
rogacy Program seeks 
bving women, 21 -45m to 
carry couples biological 
babies, prbr birth experi- 
ence required, non-smok- 
ers, generous compensa- 
tion, 1-888-363-9457 
wwwjeproductvBia[w/8r.com 

AVON! Career or pocket 
rTK>ney, ^u deckle! Up to 
50% commission profit. 
L<My start up. Email ISR 
Lisad LwitoerOaol.com 
or call toll free 1 -800-258- 
1815 



HOMES FOR RENT 

HUD HOMES! 4 Bd 2 ba 
$277/Mo! 5 bd 3 ba $306/ 
Mo! More 1-4 bedrooms 
from $199/Mo! 5% down, 
20 years @8%! For List- 
ings Call 800-559-4145 
XT170 

LAND 

NO MOUNTAINS 2 acres 
with great view, very pri- 
vate, big trees, waterfalls 
and large public lake 
nearby $69,500. Call now 
866-789-8535 

ADIRONDACK- BASS 
LAKE 19 Acres- $59,900 
Beautiful woodlands, nice 
views, great hunting/ fish- 
ing. Christmas & Associ- 
ates 
800-229-7843 



General Home (Small Repairs) 
Quincy and South Shore 



BD's Handyman Services 
Bud Dodge 

Tel. 617-471-4221 

Cell: 857-445-5943 
E-mail buddodge@conicast.net 




1/.' 



Basement Restoration Services 
Quincy, MA 



Wet or damp l)asemeiit.s? C.ot Mold? 



• Air Quality Testing 

• Mold Remediation 

• Demolition and Clean Outs 

• Sump pumps & drains 

• Foundation repairs 

• Free Estimates 

40 Years Experience 

617-417-1773 



1/17 



MISCELLANEOUS 



www. landandcamps.com 

MISCELLANEOUS 

SAWMILLS from Ofily 
$2,990.00 - Convert your 
LOGS TO VALUABLE 
LUMBER with your own 
Norwood portable band 
sawmill. Log skidders also 
available 
www.norwoodsawmills.com/ 
500A FREE information: 
1-800-578-1363 Ext. 500- 
A 

MORTGAGES 

REVERSE MORT- 

GAGES! SENIOR 

HOMEOWNERS! No pay- 
ment until you perma- 
nently leave your Resi- 
dence. Government in- 
sured, no qualifying. Call 



Frank Costa 1-800-974- 
4846 x229. Continental 
Funding, Stoughton MA 
w w w . c f c 
reversemortgage.com 

REAL ESTATE 
NY STATES BEST LAND 
EVER FINAL 2007 SALE 
8 Ac New Camp - 
$25,900. 9 Ac Big Pond - 
$19,900. 14 Ac Bdrs 
Stateland - $29,900. 1 3 Ac 
Adks #1 River - $79,900 
6 Ac Salmon River - 
$15,900. Over 150 prop- 
erties at below market 
prices. "Cream of the 
Crop" waterfront, hunting 
land & more! Top locations 
and aggressive financing 
CHRISTMAS & ASSOCH 
ATES 800-229-784 
www.landandcamps.com 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
■ 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

i NAME 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION^ 
BLANK AND MAIL TO 



aiv 

%j^ 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

I 11 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ 1 CHECK ENCLOSED 
I 11 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



1 



Thuraday, Jkntialty3, 200i ^Ai* QhS^ftsjr'Sia^' Mf 27 



ipipi 




FOR RENT 



HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE ¥. BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 
Rentals for all Occasions 
617-472-6234 
617-479-2254 „ 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

1 20 Quarry St., Quincy 

Call now to book your Party 

and other Special Events 

617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOI.com ih 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

Call for Details 

617-770-4876 

Small Weddings • Showers 

Christenings • Meetings 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 

HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 ^ 

TF 



FUNCTION FACILITY 
QUINCY YACHT CLUB 

1310 Sea St., Quincy 

Beautiful Bay Views 

Full Bar & Kitchen 

Handicap Equip 

617-471-6136 



1/24 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves, 

machinist, and sheetmetal tools, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections: old postcards, toys, 

military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Davistownmuseum.org 

e-Store & antique sale! tf 



SERVICES 



TIMOTHY J. O'BRIEN 
Building & Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 
Windows 

Free Estimates 
As Always, Lie. & Insured 

New Phone Number 
781-829-2232 



JOHNNY'S 

PAINTING & 

DRYWALL SERVICES 

Interior - Exterior 

Free Estimates 

Call 617-328-6897 



SERVICES 



pimnmmpmfasauL 

interior & Exterior 

Power Washing & Carpentry 

All Types of House Repairs 

Reasonable Price 

Small Jobs Welcome 

Leave Message 617-773-4761 ^ 



IMAGE 
IMPROVEMENT 

LANDSCAPIMQ 
SINCE 1972 

We Clean It... Trim 
It... Remove It 

No Job Too Big 
or Too Small 

*Free Estimates 
Fully Insured 

617-471-0044 



T^ 



SERVICES 



PL\NO TUNING & 
REPAIR SERVICE 

Susan Burgess, 

Certified Piano Technician 
AvMiciite Member of the 
PiaiMi Techniciaas (iuild 

781-335-2227 '"' 
email: swburgess@verizon.net 



^rM 
















1 


K| 


)i^ 






7 ('fi^^ 



SERVICES 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 

Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 



SNOwninpiG 

ComnieftSi^lt^J^sidential 
In hosf/fii%y i|p BfS |[itinp 




l/IO 



DeFrancesco Construction 

Specializing In: REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

ROOFING - TRIM - GUTTERS - VINYL SIDING 

Catt Today for a quick, FREE Estimate 

or No Hassle Information 

617-365-1444 

30 Year Guarantee on All Workmanship 

Fully Licensed & Insured MA Reg. #101376 tf 




Sump Pumps 

Sales • Services 
Installations 



617-224-3725 
Fax:617-770-3462 ^^ 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating, Gas Fitting 
Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 
Emergencies 617-792-4054 

Master Lie # 13749 tf 



THOMAS C. SWEENEY 

Smaller Jobs a Specialty 

44 Years Experience 

Carpentry, Siding, Painting, Porches 

VinylAVindows, Doors, 

Roofing, Decking, Steps 

License #1373 Free Estimates 

Reliable ^1 7-8 2^- U lO References 



HOME SWEET HOME 
REAL ESTATE 

Fran Lawlor • Quincy, MA 

617-328-9952 

CeU 617-314-3788 

O'BRiEN 

I Construction/Remodeling, Inc. 
No Job too Small 

Cleanouts/Removal 

Carpentry • Painting • Masonry 

Kitchen/Bath • Additions • Decks 

Windows • Roofs 

Interior/Exterior 

FALL SPECIAL 

10% Off Witt) Coupon 

Windows Buy 10, Get 1 Free 

617-449-8400 -Steve >' 



SAVE 

Hiid^i^et Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 

TF 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLUMBING, HEATING & AC 

Specializing in Viessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 

MA Lie #10589 3/n 



SERVICES 



HONEY B'S CLEANING 

References 

Homes • Condos 

Apartments 

Reasonable Rates 

617-223-1703 

l/IO 



SERVICES 



LAWFQRD PlUMPINg 
& HOME REPAIRS 

Small Jobs • Faucet Repairs 

• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals Installed 

• Minor Carpentry 

• Tile & Grout Repairs 
• Basel)oard & Radiator 

Steam Cleaning 

24 Hour Service 
Master Lie. ^7306 

781-817-5434 . 



mmmmm 



-Qtt) 



SERVICES 





Hancock 
TV. & Appliance 

Sates, Service, 
Palis & Installation 

Since 1945 

(617)472-1710 

115 Franklin Street, 
Quincy, MA 

hancocktvandappllance com 



*YARD WORK CO.* 

• Lawn Mowing Service 

• Every 2 weeks or 3 times a month 

• Rental Properties welcome 

• SPRING CLEANUPS 

• Mulch Work 

• Expert Hedge and Bush Trimming 

• Serving Quincy for 20 Years 

Call Bill Fielding 
617-471-6124 




McDonagh Roofing 



ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 

RUBBER ROOFING 

GUTTERS CLEANED & INSTALLED 

CHIMNEY FLASHING & POINTING 

VINYL SIDING 

VINAL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 

617-471-6960 

Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates 

Mass Reg # 147733 



3,6 



BOB'S HOME REPAIR 

* Decks and Porches Built OR Repaired 

* Front OR Back Steps Repaired OR Replaced 

* Replacement Windows Installed 

* Garages Repaired 

* Vinyl Siding Installed OR Repaired 

* Wood Shingles Repaired 

* Kitchen Cabinets Installed 

* Expert Carpenter ! ! 

INSURED. MASS. UC. # CS086I29 

CALL BOB BLAKE - 617-471-6124 



' > i 



O'DONOVAN 
CONSTRUCTION, INC. 

.4// types of Interior & Exterior 

Remodeling & Construction 

Carpentry, Roofing. Windows, 

Siding, Declu, Etc. 

Pat O'Donovan 

617-770-2942 • 617-594-3344 



QUINCY SUN 
NEWSCARRIERS WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

617-471-3100 



i/< 



SWIM LESSONS 

Red Cross Certified 

All Levels Offered 

Afternoon and Weekends 

Lincoln-Hancock Pool 

Call 617-298-0025 



l/IO 



"SPRING BASEBALL" 

Openings for Boys 

(ages 13-15) 

Babe Ruth International League 

Quincy Youth Baseball 

Call Mike for More 

information 617-773-0573 



HELP WANTED 



RETAIL SALES PERSON 

Full or Part Time 




1372 Hancock Street, Quincy 

617-471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



□ 

□ 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
Autos 
Boats 
For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 
LI Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
Q Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 

□ Day Care 
G Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



R.\TES 

1 WEEK G 

3-7 WEEKS G 

8-12 WEEKS G 

13 W EEKS 

OR MORE G 



□ Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 



$8.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 
lOc tor each additional word. 

S7.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 
the same ad, lOc each additional word. 

$6.75 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8-12 insertions 
oi the same ad 10c for each additional word. 

$6.50 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 10c for each additional word. 

for the follow in i: ad to run 



COPY 



NO RKH M) will Bt M XDK M THIS COVHt\n R Wt IN THK tN KM OK C XNt ti L AllON 
DK.XDl INK: KRIDW \1 4PM. PI.K.\SE IMI I DK VOl R PHONK Nl MBFR IN Vl>. 



i^ge28 TlMi Quinosr 011^ Thnnday, Jaimwy 3, IMf 



^V 




PRKTT> DKCORATIONS and brilliant holiday lights adorn these two homes on Adams Street, making picturesque day-time and night-time scenes. 



Agenda For Conservation 
Commission Meeting Jan. 9 



Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 



MEMA's $2,500 To Enhance 
City's Emergency Response 



I ami Subici. t u> (o.ist Sti>rni 

8:10 p.m. 

Coniuuicd Notice o\ hitcnt 
tikil h\ I\>ii.ilil I' HtK-kleN 
Km iIu' U'c.tli/.iiion i^t the 
(. onvli lie luMi o\ .1 pici. 
111*. liiilinj:«.i»nipli.tiKL'\Mth.ill 
.ipplu .ibk- w cllands 

ii.'i:ul.jiioiiv. on prt>pcit\ 
kK.Ued at 144 Shoiv A\c 

Hoach. I and unJci ihc 
(Xc.tn. !()(>- liHM Bullci /one 
o\ t o.istal Bank 

8:15 p.m. 



Continued Notice i>t intent 
filed by I^aniel Dunn, 
touchstone Propeilies. LLC. 
tor the denmlition of the 
exitine wood building, 
consistinc ot 2 two-story 
buildines and 3 one-story 
buiklines. and constniction 
ot a townhouse 

ci>ndoniiniuni complex -8 
three-story units-assi>ciated 
parkini! and drainaee 
structures, on property 
Kvated at 71-75 Brackett St. 
200 Foot-Rivertront 
Area-To\Kn Bnx^k. UX)-FiH>t 



Buffer Zone to Bordenng 
Vegetated Wetlands and 
Coastal Bank; Bordering 
Land Subject to Rooding and 
Coastal Storm Rowage 

8:20 p.m. 
Continued Reconsideration 
of the Notice of Intent filed 
by Aidan Feeney for the 
construction of a single- 
family residence on property 
hxated at 1 1 Gertrude Ave. 
Land Subject to Coastal 
Storm Flowage; Coastal 
Bank: UXVfoot Buffer Zone 
of Saltmarsh. 



The Citizen Corps Pro- 
gram in Quincy has received 
a grant of $2,500 from the 
Mass Emergency Manage- 
ment Agency for the pur- 
chase of equipment to en- 
hance its emergency capa- 
bilities. 

Tom Gorman, director of 
Emergency Management, 
said the funds will be spent 
on medical supplies, two 
CPR mannequins, defibrilla- 
tor training, flashlights and 
foul weather gear. 



The fund, which is the participated in the federal 

same sum the city received grant awards designed to 

last year, will become avail- provide critical assets to lo- 

able after the first of the year, cal CCPs through the coor- 

said Gorman. dinated procurement of criti- 

In all, 94 communities cal equipment. 

NQHS Parents Meet Tonight 

The North Quincy High Principal Earl Metzler 
School Parents Advisory and Assistant Principal Pam 
Committee will meet tonight Mateu will present their 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. in the monthly reports. All inter- 
Trophy Room of the high ested parties are invited, 
school. 



All aboard! Get $125 Free! 




That's right. Our new office has docked across from the shipyard and you're invited to 
come aboard. Not only is our new office in ship shape condition, but you could earn up 
to $125 when opening a new checking account... 



® Open a new checking account 
^ Use our FREE direct deposit 

# Use our FREE online bill pay 

# Use our FREE Bonus Check Card 
® Close your old checking account 

# Do all the above and you receive 




Now Open! Shipyard Office 505 Quincy Ave. 





Braintree Cooperative Bank 

7Be Lxai Ox>u^ Unce 1889 



"» 



505 Quincy Avenue (Rt 53) • Quincy, MA 02169 • 781 -S43-1 370 • www.bfalntreecooperative.com 



I 



'This Nmfted wne <rftef ft maSatim on^ « our nem ShipyMd Olfioe. Vrfd fcu mtm dmiusiq tcosun amonwn on% and one chedtina «xount per costorrief . fionusti vM be pa«d ^Mm 90 d^ <rf opentei the account as 
iolio*vsS25uponoperwig(Mth«S25rnir*n(^T»depc»fcUS«fteftfieft«d^e^ $25 

upon i€cHx of afcirik aalBmem ftom ywir formw bank rtwiMr^fl the ck^^ 
to dwnge and may be ia>ithdm>g> K ary awe without noact. "IMI 









|5 



McCarthy Hedges To Accent 

Strong Educational System 

- ?a%e 16 - 




The Quincy 



Historic Quincy's Hometown Weekly Newspaper 




VOL.40 No. 17 



Thursday, January 10, 2008 



Takes Oath As 33rd Mayor 



Koch's First Priorities: Drug Crackdown 
Controlled Development • Open Door Policy 




TOM KOCH TAKES his oath from City Clerk Joseph Shea as Quinc> ^ ii ' mayor at inaugural 
ceremonies Monday at the Quincy Marriott ballroom. With him are his wife, Christine, and 
children Comeihis, Thomas, Jr. and Abigail. Behind them are Councillors Doug Gutro, Brian 
McNamee and Kevin Coughiin. 




ByTOMHENSHAW 

Newly inaugurated 
Mayor Tom Koch laid out his 
vision of a new Quincy that 
will feature a renewed fight 
on drug abuse, new taxable 
development outside the 
neighborhoods and a "more 
open, responsive and ... ef- 
ficient" government. 

"To all of you," he said, 
"know my door is always 
open." 

Throughout his inaugural 
address Monday in the ball- 
room of the Marriott Hotel, 
he repeatedly called on the 
people of Quincy to get in- 
volved alongside him, quot- 
ing John F. Kennedy: 'To- 
day, every citizen, regardless 
of his interest in politics, 
holds office." 

Koch said he recognized 
concems about "overdevel- 
opment in our neighbor- 




MA YOR TOM KOCH spells out his vision of Quincy 's future 
in his inaugural address. 

hoods and I hear your con- 
cems about traffic gridlock 
on our streets. 

"I feel strongly that we 
must act to protect our neigh- 
borhoods ... I also recog- 



nize the need for new ta.\ rev- 
enue, which involves new 
development. 

'To balance these two in- 
terests, we must be clear 
(Cont'd On Pa^e 13l 



Unanimously Elected City Council President 

Davis Looks Forward 
To Working With Koch 



nVE FORMER MAYORS jom Mayor Thonaas Koch at his inaugural. From the left, Walter 
Hannon, James Sheets, William Phelan, Koch, Joseph LaRaia and Frank McCauley. Mayor 
Arthur Tobin, recuperating from recent surgery was unable to attend. 




CONGRESSMAN William DeUhunt, state Treasurer Tim CahiU, Fr. James Hawker, Vicar of 
Education, Diocese of Charlotte, North Carolina formerly of Sacred Heart Church and a close 
friend of the Koch f amUy, and M^or Douglas J ones, commander Salvation Army Quincy Temple 
Corps applaud after Mayor Koch's imiugural address. 

Quincy Sun Photos^obert Noble 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

The baby boomer's kids 
are the future for Quincy, 
according to new City 
Council President Jay Davis. 

At Monday's 

inauguration ceremonies. 
Davis described the dozens 
of assets that young families 
and professionals will find in 
the City of Presidents. 

"These children of baby- 
boomers desire to be closer 
to work and recreation. And 
like us. they chose to live in 
Quincy.' Davis said, "We 
need to be proactive with this 
group, promoting events and 
encouraging businesses that 
serve this demographic." 

"We need to visit Davis 
Square m SomerNiUe, Porter 
Square in Cambridge and 
Waltham Center to see what 




JAY DAV IS uf Ward 4 is sworn in as president of the City 
Council by City Clerk Joseph Shea. 



businesses are there and 
encourage them to e.xpand 
into Quincy," Davis said. 

"As many business 
owners, such as mv law 



partners and (1) know. 
Qumcy is a great place to do 
business," said Davis. 
"Quincy is a wonderful 
(Cont'd On Page II) 




%grw v" Wm 



Im21-^ap2 ■ T^nml^^^S^tyMaitsg^Y^ur -F^f^iJ 



HUD Has Plan To Help 
Families Keep Homes 



Quincy Community Ac- 
tion Programs (QCAP) has 
announced the receipt of a 
$40,000 federal grant to help 
families and individuals at 
risk to find or keep their 
homes. 

Better still. Taylor 
Caswell, regional director of 
Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment (HUD), discussed a 
four-month-old program, 
called "FHASecure." that 
may help homeowners who 
aie facmg foreclosure. 

"FHASecure is designed 
lor people who are gixxl bor- 
n>wers. but were steered into 
high cost loans with teaser 
rates. ■ he said. 

I'ndcr FHASecure fami- 
lies with stn^ng credit ratings 
who had been making timely 
mortgage payments before 
their adjustable loans were 



reset to higher rates, may 
qualify for refinancing. 

Eligible homeowners are 
r^uired to meet strict under- 
writing guidelines and pay a 
mortgage insurance pre- 
mium, which offsets the risk 
to FHA's insurance fund at 
no cost to the taxpayer. 

To qualify, homeowners 
must meet the following cri- 
tena: 

• A history of on-time 
mortgage payments before 
the borrowers teaser rates 
expired and loans reset 

• Interest rates must have 
or will be reset between June, 
2(K)5. and December. 20(W. 

• Three per cent cash or 
equity in the home. 

• A sustained history of 
employment. 

• Sufficient income to 
make the m<irtgage payment. 



Since the plan was an- 
nounced in September. 579 
adjustable rate mortgages in 
Massachusetts have been re- 
financed into an FHA loans. 

The $40,000 award to 
QCAP is being provided by 
HUD's Housing Counseling 
Program to assist first-time 
home buyers to navigate 
what can be an extremely 
confusing and difficult pro- 
cess. 

"Housing education pro- 
grams offered by QCAP help 
families make informed 
choices before they take the 
important step of home own- 
ership," said Caswell. 

"Getting the correct infor- 
mation at the beginning of 
the process will help families 
avoid mortgage troubles later 
on." 




Computer & Medical Skills Training 

Quincy College offers popular Certificate Programs 
OiTiMrv ^'""^^"^ ^" January 28th and continuing throughout the 
c o L L I c E spring semester at our Quincy & Plymouth Campuses. 

• Self-paced Microsoft Office (Word. Excel, 
PowerPoint & Access) starts every Monday with 
flexible course design & class schedules. 

• Medical Billing & Coding Certificate 

• Medical Administrative Assistant Certificate 

• Quick Books Certificate 

We oflFer the best price/value proposition in the Boston area 
with selected tuitions starting as low as $295. 

For more detailed information call 617-984-1662 

or for easy phone registration call 617-984-1650 

or visit our website: ww^.quincy coilege.edu 

Quincy College. 24 Saville Avenue, Quincy. Ma 02169 






Turn to 
Our Familv 

When your 
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Dunk The Vote Founder Keynote Speaker 

Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Breakfast On Jan. 21 



Ron Bell, founder of Dunk 
the Vote, will be the keynote 
speaker Monday. Jan. 21. at 
the city's 1 2th annual Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Breakfast 
sponsored by the Human 
Rights Commission. 

The theme of this year's 
breakfast is "A Morning of 
Celebrating, Reflecting, 
Sharing, and Singing." 

At the breakfast, the 
commission will also honor 
three longtime activists: Dr. 
Joseph McDermott and Janet 
and Alden Poole for their 
dedication to serving the 
Quincy community. 

All are welcome to the 
breakfast scheduled from 9 
a.m. to 1 1 a.m. at North 
Quincy High School 
cafeteria, 316 Hancock St., 
according to Tom Fabrizio, a 
commission member. 

Tickets may be purchased 
at the door or by contacting 
Ann Yeomans. Commission 
Chairman at 617-773-5306. 
Adult tickets are $10; 
students and seniors, 60 year- 
old and over, $6; and 
children, 5 and under, are 
free. 

Remembering Martin 
Luther King, Jr. and his work 
is especially important, said 
Ann Yeomans, Chairwoman 
of the Commission. 

"Dr. King was a stellar 
example of the hard work 
required to include all people 
under the human rights 
umbrella," Yeomans said. 
"Especially since he is in 
recent history, his memory 
can help in keeping human 
rights alive for all of us and 
ensuring that we do not take 
them for granted. 

"In Quincy, I am very 
proud of our welcome to our 
new neighbors from all over 
the world and very pleased to 
have this of^rtunity to share 
our knowledge of and faith 
in human rights with them," 
she added. 

Mayor Thomas Koch, 




RON BELL 

Norfolk County District Atty . 
William Keating and 
Yeomans will offer the 
opening remarks and the 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Center Chorus and the Poole 
Family Singers will present 
musical selections. 

Koch, City Council 
President Jay Davis and 
Keating will present the 
awards. Moderators are 
Kumu Gupta, vice- 
chairwoman, and Harvey 
Solomon, treasurer. 

The main speaker. Bell, 
has been a community 
organizer and voting rights 
advocate for over 20 years. 
In 2006. Bell served as 
Deputy Campaign manager 
for Governor Patrick's 
gubernatorial campaign. 

Bell currently serves as 
director of Gov. Deval 
Patrick's Office of Civic 
Engagement which promotes 
active volunteerism and civic 
engagement. 

In 1992, Bell founder 
Dunk the Vote, a Boston- 
based non-partisan, non- 
profit organization dedicated 
to increasing civic 
participation and promoting 
social change. Under Bell's 
leadership, the organization 
has registered over 40,000 
new voters since in the early 
1990's. He also directed the 
''Selma March: Retracing the 
Struggle" in October, 2005. 

Next week. Bell will focus 
on these accomplishments 



when he discusses, "The 
Power of A Dream" at North 
Quincy High School. 

"There's power in 
dreams," Bell said. "I was 
inspired by the dream" of 
registering thousands of new 
voters so he worked to "put 
the dream into action." 

Bell believes that 
Governor Patrick's election 
restored hope for King's 
vision. This is not because 
Patrick is black, but because 
he represents all people, he 
said. 

"There's a sense of hope 
instilled," said Bell who said 
that King, assassinated in 
1 968, would be "turning over 
in his grave" if he found 
people satisfied with just 
singing, "We Shall 
Overcome." 

Bell's next project is to 
help organize Governor 
Patrick' s plan for a statewide 
youth council. 

Under Patrick's plan, a 
council of 1 4 young men and 
women representing all 
backgrounds will focus on 
violence prevention, 
leadership development and 
career building. 

The commission's annual 
breakfast, a Quincy tradition 
for 12 years, draws several 
hundred participants from all 
over the South Shore, 
according to Fabrizio who 
noted that residents of Milton, 
Randolph and Weymouth are 
often in attendance. 

"It' s been very successful, 
very well attended," said 
Fabrizio, adding, "It's a 
celebration of human rights." 

In addition to Yeomans, 
commission members are 
Gupta, Secretary Nancy 
McDonald, Treasurer 
Solomon, Fabrizio, Lt. 
Jeffrey Burrell, David 
Ezickson, Edmund Grogan, 
Rev. David Helfing, Dr. 
McDermott, Niel Orlando, 
Frank Poon and Rev. Eurgene 
Ward. 



BATES & RIORDAN, up 

Attorneys At Law 





Theodore Riordan, Esq. 

Fonner clot, Rl Supreme Court 



Deborah Bates Riordan, Esq. 

Nune-AttMney 



\N Nv\N.Hiiti'sKi«ri(|;in.i()ni 
f»4- W.WH in k Nini I. W.ijhisinn • U»n» 32N-S(KS(» 



tddyfAyCjMbkryM:i<Mi «iM«iaif69a«S tm^ 



Sold To Korean Firm 



30-story Goliath 
Crane Leaving Shipyard 



First it was the 
craneways, those familiar 
steel skeletons that stood 
witness to the creation of the 
battleships, carriers and 
cruisers that won World War 
II. 

Now it is the turn of the 
Goliath crane, a landmark on 
Quincy's skyline for more 
than 30 years, to leave the 
scene of so many triumphs.. 

Pretty soon, all that will 
be left of the once bustling 
Fore River Shipyard will be 
an historic plaque on the 
wall of a condo or a Wal- 
Mart box. 

Nearly four years after the 
Yard was purchased at auc- 
tion by auto magnate Dan 
Quirk, Goliath has been sold 
for a pittance to a Korean 
shipbuilding company for 
use in a Romanian shipyard. 

It is hoped that Goliath 
will be dismantled and put to 



sea on a barge to begin the 
4,000-mile voyage to its new 
home on the Black Sea coast 
sometime in the spring. 

Goliath was erected in 
1975 by General Dynamics, 
then owner of the shipyard, 
for the basic purpose of 
hoisting giant cargo spheres, 
made in South Carolina, 
onto Quincy-built liquified 
natural gas tankers. 

It served its basic 
purpoise and other purposes 
as well. 

On Aug. 18, 1984. 
Goliath lifted a 1,120 ton 
deck house into place opn a 
Maritime Prepositioning 
Ship, at the time the 
heaviuest lift ever made at 
any shipyard in the United 
States. 

The deckhouse, 97 x 80 
feet, was big enough to pro- 
vide living quarters for 160 
mihtary personnel. 



^Bampa' Sullivan 
Blood Drive Jan. 12 



You can trade a pint of 
your blood for a pound of 
coffee Saturday, July 12, at 
St. Thomas Aquinas Hall, 2 
Darrow St., Houghs Neck, 
sponsored by the Joseph 
"Bampa" Sullivan Memo- 
rial. 

That's when the Red 
Cross Bloodmobile will be 
on site to collect blood from 



donors and present each a 
coupon entitling them to a 
pound of Dunkin' Donuts 
coffee. 

You can make an appoint- 
ment simply by calling 1- 
800-GIVE-LIFE (1-800- 
448-3543) or by visiting 
givelife.org (sponsor code 
754 1 ). Positive identification 
is required. 



It remained when General 
Dynamics closed the ship- 
yard for good in 1986, prob- 
ably the biggest crane in the 
Western Hemisphere at 30 
stories high with nothing to 
do. 

Quirk bought 1 1 3 acres of 
the old shipyard, including 
Goliath, at federal auction 
for $9 million in 2003 and 
tried to sell off the big crane 
but there were no takers. 

Not until Daewoo Ship- 
building and Marine Engi- 
neering of South Korea came 
along with an undisclosed 
offer in the name of its 
Daewoo Mangalia Heavy 
Industries, its Romanian 
subsidiary. Quirk won't say 
how much. 

With Goliath out of the 
way. Quirk can devote 
fulltime to his plan to de- 
velop the old shipyard into a 
residential, industrial and 
conmiercial area with some 
saiUng amenities. 

And, of course, a plaque 
noting that it was once the 
famed Fore River Shipyard. 




GOLIATH CRANE that once lifted a 1 , 1 20 ton deckhouse Into place on a warship, is moving from 
the Quincy skyline to a new home on the Black Sea. 

Inaugural Reruns Planned On QATV 



So you missed the historic 
inauguration of Tom Koch as 
the 33rd mayor of Quincy 
when it was shown live at the 
Marriott Hotel Monday 
m(»ming! 

Quincy Access Tetevision 
plans to rerun the ceremony 
at least a dozen times be- 



tween Wednesday and Sun- 
day evening on both Chan- 
nels 8 and 10. 

Channels 

Wednesday - 2 p.m. and 
8 p.m. 

Thursday- 10 a.m. 

Friday - 7 p.m. 

Saturday - 1 1 a.m. and 4 



p.m. 

Sunday - 1 1 a.m., 4 p.m. 
and 8 p.m. 

Channel 10 

Wednesday - 10:30 a.m. 
and 8 p.m. 

Thursday - 10 a.m. 

And stay tuned. More re- 
runs may be added on Chan- 
nel 10 over the weekend. 



Aptitude Tests At NQHS Jan. 30 



The Armed Services Vo- 
cational Aptitude Battery 
will be administered 
Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 7:30 
a.m.. at North Quincy High 



School. 

Interested juniors and se- 
niors should contact Lauren 
Gallo in the Guidance Office 
or call 617-984-8987. 



NUTRITION STORE 

GRAND OPENING!!! 

This Week 

Performance Nutrition which has been 

closed since late November, will have its 

Grand Opening under new ownership. For 

the inconvenience of the sudden closure there 

will be a 10% sale on all merchandise. The 

new owner would like to welcome all Quincy 

residents back to the store. 

Performance Nutrition is still located 

at 59 Franklin St. on the comer 

intersecting Water St. 





3 PIECE COMBO OFFER 

XL Upright Vac 
Canister Vac 
^^ Cordless Iron 

All 3 
«299 






Quincy 617472-<280 • BraintrM 781-64a-1S16 



What kind of mortgage 
are you looking for? 

• If you're a first-time homebuyer, you probably have lots of questions. 
That's fine. We're happy to give you ihe time you need. That's the kind of bank 
we are - that's the kind of people we are. 

• If you're an experienced homebuyer putting down a significant 
annount on a new home, our quicker- payoff 15-Year Mortgage might be 
right for you. Or maybe you'd rather have a 30-Year Loan. It's your choice! 

• And K you want to refinance using your equity, we can help make 
that happen too. 

Colonial Federal is a dependable, trustworthy community bank. Our loan 
officers are not on commission so their only goal is to help you get a loan 
you understand and can live with. If you pay your loan off early, we don't hit 
you with pre-payment penalties. And we're here to answer your questions 
after the closing too. Sound good? Come see us or call Angela Blanchard, 
Cathy Barry or Eileen Flibotte at 617-471-0750. 



30-YEAR FIXED 



6.05 



% 



APR 



NOPOINTSI 



WHAT»S THE MONTHLY PAYMENT? 



A quick example . . . the monthly payment 
(principal & interest) on a $100,000 
mortgage is $599.55 

(With a 30-year fixed rate loan at 6.05% APR. 
From the mortgage calculator at colonialfed.com.) 




COLONIAL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 

"Your neighborhood bank!" 



QUINCY 1 5 Beach Street 617-471-0750 • 1000 Southern Artery (Residents only t 617-479-1430 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin Street 781-7671776 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Middle 4 Washington Streets 781-33 1-1776 • www coiomaifed.cooi 

Some additional facts: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) effective as of 01 02 08 and niay 
change Applies to I - 2 family owner-occupied homes. Assumes a maximum 80% loan-to-value 
md first mortgage position. A 30- Year Loan wouW be repaid m 360 equal payments of $6.00 
p«r $ 1 000 borrowed. Sub|«ct to credit approval. Escrow tax payments may change. 



LENOCR 
InsurwiFCHC 



trrj-IOI-IIIPMlh «« '■■■'-, 



J-TiaWtUWllhilM 



'* '•«»»*4 'ffri v^«frt#C» •#.'# 



&1 




USPS 453-080 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Ouincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Boswofth, Jr.. PtMsher 

Robert H. Bosworth, Editor 

50c per copy S25 00 per year by rnail in Ouincy 
$30 00 per year by mail outside Ouirxry $36.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Ouincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

Th* Qumcy Sun aMumM no Imanoal r> tpoo t< ) «t y tor typographical arrort m 
advariwanriantt but writ raprmt ittat part ot an advartwwnant m m^iich tha typographical 
•rfof oocum 




Moments 
in time 

MHBTOnfCHANNE 



On Jan. 11, 1927, CharUc 
Chaplin's $16 millicwi estate 
>s frozen by court receivers 
after his second wife. Lita 
Grey Chaplin, sues for 
divorce. Lita was a 16-year- 
old hopeful actress when the 
.^5-vear-old Chaplin mamed 
her'in 1924. 

On Jan. 13. 1939, Arthur 
"Doc" Barker is killed while 
trying to escape from Alca- 
tra? Pnson in San Francisco 
Bay Barker, of the notorious 
"Bloody Barkers" gang, was 
sponed on the shore of the 
island after climbing over 
the walls. 

On Jan. 12, 1944, Alft^ 
Hitchcock's "Lifeboat" pre- 
mieres at the AstoT Theater 
in New York "Lifeboat" 
demonstrated Hitchcock's 
mastery of suspense by con- 
finmg all action to the space 
of the small boat. 

On Jan. 10. 1961, Dashiell 
Hammen. author of *The 
Maltese Falcon." dies. The 
novel was filmed three 
limes: once in 1 93 1 ; once m 
1936 under the ntJe "Satan 
Met a Lady." starring Bene 
Davis; and again in 1941, 
stamng Humphrey Bogart. 



time" by E.L. Doctorow is 
awarded the National Book 
Critics Circle Award. The 
book deals with race rela- 
tions in the 1920s, mixing 
fictional characters with real 
figures from the era. 

On Jan. 9, 1984, Angelo 
Buono. one of the Hillside 
Stranglers, is sentenced to 
life m pnson for the rape, 
torture and murder of 10 
women in Los Angeles. 
Buono insisted on his inno- 
cence, pointing to the lack of 
physical evidence. Buono 's 
house was so clean that 
investigators couldn't even 
find Buono 's own finger- 
prints in the home. 

On Jan. 7, 1999, the U.S. 
Senate begins its impeach- 
ment trial of President Bill 
Clmton. The trial was the 
culmination of numerous 
scandals involving the presi- 
dent and first lady Hillary 
Clinton that included 
allegedly improper 

Arkansas real estate deals, 
suspected fundraismg viola- 
tions, claims of sexual 
harassment and accusations 
of cronyism involving the 
firing of White House travel 
agents. 



On Jan. 8, 1976, "Rag- C 20(K King Features Synd. Inc 



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QUINa ANIMAL SHELTER 

56 Broad anet,(MKf ' 617-376-1349 

^wncfoulnotthmwftOifi 

IN'SHELTERADOFTION HOURS 

TUESDAY and THUKMYS 6M to BM pm 

SATUItDAYS 10 am ' 4 pm 

Uoiilkm has kchdt kdlkd vatdmrikms 

^aml Spaf /Healer as aaadad. 100% ¥okmleer rva^ 

new woHmieen tuffofs 000000. 

FOR LOST or FOUND ANIIHUdSiall 

cm OF QUINa ANIMAL COHTROL 

01617^76^1364. 

AVAILABLE pons 
BENJ1: 5 y.o. Shih Tzu. 
LHJClI yo., very energetic. 

WE HAVE LOTS OF OTTENS 

^EUNSElJ mos.. aU Mack. 
J£SSI£lYoiiii« male, all Mack. 
MANNALFemale tabby. 
MABI1AKEI1.5 y.o. pait Siamese. 
PINKY: Uf fat fray tabby female. 
SXUXSIEBLSweet black tad wkite. 6 y.o. 
TQQTSm rwMie) A MUTPPf ffrarh Would like 
to be adopted togedier. 
WAUKh.1 in y.o playful A finntfy. 
Foster PareaH/Bema Vrgemify Needed 



ffuffftmnma 



miiiumiw^ 





I I s: 



By Henry Bosworth 



Koch Changes Mayoral Scene 




Tom Koch did a couple of things when he raised his 
right hand Monday. 
He raised it, of course, to take his 
oath as Quincy' s 33"^ mayor. 

And by doing so, he also pushed the 
mayoral aspirations of several city 
councillors-maybe others-to the 
political back burner. KOCH 

They may possibly have to put aside 
their mayoral thoughts for up to eight years waiting for 
the right time to run. 

Koch could very well be a four-term mayor. 
He has the personality, disposition, energy, 
willingness to listen and the know-how to be a good 
mayor and a popular one. 
He's no rookie. 

By defeating incumbent William Phelan by a 2,000- 
vote margin in November he completely changed the 
mayoral scene. 

If Phelan had won a fourth term, it would probably 
have been his last. "I don't think a mayor should stay 
longer than eight years," he says. "That's long enough 
and then turn it over to someone else." 

If Phelan was re-elected, it would have set the stage 
for a scramble for the mayor's office 
in 2009. 

But while potential candidates 
decided to wait, Koch saw opportunity 
knocking and jumped in to challenge 
Phelan and won. 

Most political observers thought 
he was taking a big gamble, giving up 
his job as Park Commissioner and a sure weekly 
paycheck to take on an incumbent mayor. 

But Koch put together a well-organized campaign 
team, raised money and issues and did what many 
thought couldn't be done. 

Koch, who will turn 45 later this month, is young 
enough to serve four terms-or more-and go on to other 
things. 

As he was delivering his inaugural address Monday 
in the packed Quincy Marriott Hotel balbxx)m, several 
counciUors peiiiaps were thinking, such thoughts as 
"Someday that will be me standing up there, taking my 
oath..." 

But that "someday" isn't as close as it once may have 
seemed now that Koch has moved into the coveted 
Third Floor Office. And where, no doubt, he intends to 

Ward 2 Democrats 
To Caucus Feb. 2 




RAYMONDI 




PHELAN 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 2 will caiKus Saturday, 
Feb. 2, at 10 a.m. in ti» Fore 
River Clut^ouse. 1 6 Nevada 
Rd., Quincy Point to choose 
1 1 delegates and two altea*- 
nates to the DenKxratic State 
Conventi(Mi. 

The convention will be 
held Friday, June 7. at the 
Tsongas Arena in Lowell. 

The caucus is open to all 



registered Democrats in 
Ward 2. Candidates for del- 
egate must consent to nomi- 
nation in writing and be 
present at the caucus. All 
ballots will be written and 
seoeL 

For more information, 
contact Brad Croall. the 
Ward 2 chair, at 617-930- 
0106. 



Seek Medical Gear To Loan 



TheOMmdJ oo Aginf is 
seeking donarioiM cttaa&k- 
cal equipment Aat it no 
loQger needed by the cooMt 
owner but €» bekMaedio 



somecNieelse. 

The pieseat high^ prior- 
ity is given to b«lh transfer 



Can die Comici! m. 617- 
376-1506. 



stay awhile. 

Who are the potential mayoral candidates now left 
waiting and wondering if opportunity will still knock 
on their door? 

Dan Raymondi, who passed up a nm against Phelan 
in 2003, can't be written off. He endorsed Koch over 
Phelan but that doesn't mean he has lost interest in the 
mayor's office. 

Others include Joseph Finn, John 
Keenan, Koch's brother in-law; Doug 
Gutro, Mike McFarland, Kevin 
Coughlin and possibly Jay Davis, the 
new council president. 

If Koch stays four terms, they will 
be eight years older and things could 
change for them. 

But who can say for sure that Koch's successor will 
be a city councillor? 

Mayors have usually come out of the city council. 
But Hielan broke that tradition in 200 1 when he defeated 
incumbent James Sheets by 1 7 votes in the city ' s closest 
mayoral election. 

Phelan, who was only in his second year on the 
school committee, was the first mayor in 79 years to get 
to that office without first taking the traditional route 
through the city council chamber. 

Now, in Koch, who resigned as Park Commissioner 
to run we have back-to-back mayors who never served 
in the city council. 

Could there be another? 

Q 
MONDAY MARKED another milestone for Jeaime 
Reardon who was elected to her 28* full-time one-year 
term as clerk of City Council 
Conamittees. 

Jay Davis will be the 14* city 
council president she has worked 
under. She was nominated by 
Councillor Leo Kelly who first 
nominated her in 1980. 

Jeanne is closing in on Percy Lane' s 
3 1 years as clerk. A Patriot Ledger reporter, he served 
part time as clerk from 1939 to 1970. 

Percy, who died in 1 97 1 , was a bit of a punster. Like 
this wisdom he had for cub reporters: "You don't have 
to be crazy to be a reporter, but it helps," 

G 
THE SOUTH SHORE Chamber of Commerce came 
up with a novel idea that has made a big hit with its 
memb^^. 

The 2008 membership dLectory Connections has 
individualized covers with the name of the member, 
company, owner or chief officer and address. 

John Stobierski, Chamber vice-president, says 2,500 
individualized cover directories were printed by Star 
LittK) of Weymouth- 

Q 
POLITICAL TRIVIA, compliments of Frank 
McCauley: 

Tom Koch is the third North Quincy High School 
graduate to be elected mayor. William Phelan was the 
second. Who was the first? 

(Answer at the end of the colimin.) 

G 

THE NORTH QUINCY High School Choir and 

director Tinx^y Carew dttsei\t a big bow for their 

beautiful raKiiticMis at Monday ' s inaugural ceremonies. 

The Star Spangled Banner, America The Beautifiil 

and My America, never sounded better. 

Hope tfaey will make a CD of one of their concerts if 
tfaey haven't already. 
(Aaswer Walt^ Hannoo) 




REARDON 



Thursday, JapuaryJO, 2008, 



Siu& Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



THIS 1926 POSTCARD is a view of the new Quincy 
Police Headquarters building on the comer of Sea Street 
and the Southern Artery. A great deal of controversy 
surrounded the siting of the building until Mayor Perley 
Barbour selected this city owned parcel. Finished in 
May, the dedication was delayed for two months due to 
the death of Chief Alfred Goodhue. He had been ill, but 
died unexpectedly at the young age of 52. He was widely 
.admired and highly respected in the community. In his 



memory the citizens of Quincy contributed to a city- 
wide collection for a beautiful Quincy granite monu- 
ment at Mount WoUaston Cemetery and a handsome 
plaque in the new station. In the late 1980s, under 
Mayor Frank McCauley, this building was modernized 
and expanded with a new fa^de that has substantially 
altered its appearance. To contact Tom Galvin, e-mail 
tmgalvin@verizon.net 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



1977 



Ri:ai>i:rs Foruivi 



Filling An Open School Committee Seat 



What is the best way to 
fill the open School Commit- 
tee seat of Jim Timmins; 
Joint Convention, default to 
the "runner up," special elec- 
tion, mayoral appointment, 
or leave it vacant? 

The Joint Convention 
provides a simplified solu- 
tion. It calls on all of the 
elected Quincy officials to 
hold a de facto election. The 
elected officials have earned 
the respect and trust of the 
people. They are called upon 
to publicly discuss, debate 
and decided who will do the 
best job. The Joint Conven- 
tion has an important respon- 
sibility to solicit many can- 
didates, listen to their quali- 



When I was a young man, 
I met Richard Koch. He 
asked me to coach and play 
for the Koch Club which I 
did for many years. In 1959, 
the Koch Club won the state 
semi-pro basketball champi- 
onship with a record of 25 
wins, 5 losses, and I aver- 
aged 34 points a game. 

Richard Koch also asked 
me to handle the campaign 
of John F. Kennedy, our 
then-future President, in 
Quincy. On one occasion I 
drove John Kennedy in an 
open convertible through the 
streets of Quincy. 

During this time, Dick 
Koch became my mentor, 
my friend, and a surrogate 
father to roe. In addition, he 
suggested that I run for of- 
fice here in Quincy, and I ran 
for Ward 5 city councillor 
and won. Under his guidance 
I was ward councillor for 
four years, councillor-at- 
largc for four years, city 
council president, acting 
mayor, state representative, 
and last but not least, I was 
elected Norfolk County dis- 
trict attCMmey for 12 years. 

I learned that Dick Koch 
was: No. 1 - a genius at the 



fications, increasing the tal- 
ent pool to select from. The 
Joint Convention can work 
best if they take this oppor- 
tunity to find the best candi- 
date for the School Commit- 
tee, for our children and for 
our city. 

The "next person" who 
previously ran for School 
Conmiittee and lost could be 
selected. What election 
should be used, the most im- 
mediate election or the elec- 
tion that the vacating mem- 
ber ran in? Should the "next 
person" on the list be re- 
quired to have a certain num- 
ber of votes or a certain per- 
centage to be considered a 
reasonable alternative? It 



would make sense if that per- 
son finished a few hundred 
votes or 10 percentage points 
behind. But would it make 
sense if the person lost by 
3,000, 5,000 or 10,000 votes 
or needed an additional 50% 
of the votes. Where is it rea- 
sonable to draw the line? 
Also, in essence we would be 
casting three votes to fill four 
positions: three School Com- 
mittee members and one al- 
ternate. 

A special election could 
be held. In democratic prin- 
ciple this would be the ideal 
solution. A city wide special 
election would cost about 
$60,000. Could that $60,000, 
which is close to the average 



TVibute To Richard Koch 



art of politics; and No. 2 - 
that he did more good for his 
community than any man I 
ever met. 

While on the City Coun- 
cil, I served as chairman of 
the Park and Recreation 
Committee, and Dick Koch 
became the head of the Park 
Department. We continued 
to work closely together to 
make sure that the children 
of this city had excellent 
parks to play in. 

When Dick Koch died, 
the funeral was held at Sa- 
cred Heart Church, where he 



was an usher for many years. 
The tears were flowing that 
day, as I felt I had lost my 
best friend, and the man who 
had guided me to my suc- 
cess. 

Dick Koch is not longer 
amongst us, but his memory 
and what he did for the com- 
munity is stiU here. For the 
last 16 years I have presented 
the Richard Koch Scholar- 
ship to a North Quincy High 
School student to attend the 
University of Massachusetts. 
I also erected a plaque at the 



salary for a teacher, be bet- 
ter used? 

The mayor is the Chair- 
man of the School Commit- 
tee. If he were able to appoint 
a person to fill a vacancy he 
would in essence have two 
votes, twice as many as any 
other member. 

The School System im- 
pacts everyone in the city 
and accounts for about one- 
third of the city budget. It is 
too important a position to 
leave vacant for long. 

Karl Roos 
Park St. 

(Editor's Note: Mr. Roos is 
a candidate for the vacant 
School Committee seat.) 



Merrymount Park in honor 
of his service to the parks of 
this city. 

His son Thomas Koch has 
now been inaugurated as the 
Mayor of this city. I know his 
father is up in heaven look- 
ing down on him and still 
guiding him to this day. I 
know that his son carries 
with him the same values, 
and I wish him well as he 
starts out on his political ca- 
reer. 

George G. Burke, Esq. 
Quincy. 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■ I 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
I ]1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

I ]1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



3 Storms Wipe Out 
City's Snow Budget 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

Three snowstorms that wracked the city during the past 
two weeks have completely depleted the city's budget for 
snow removal, according to Mayor 
Joseph J. LaRaia. 

LaRaia could not estimate the cost 
of snow removal for the three storms 
but said that the $ 1 1 8,588 budgeted 
for such costs for the year, covered 
only, "most of the first storm." 

The city will have to borrow or transfer funds to fight 
future storms this year. 

The city plowing crews could not keep up with the most 
recent snowfall and slicks of packed, glazed snow lined most 
of the city's side streets and few main roads. 

$28.8 MILLION SCHOOL BUDGET PROPOSED 

School Supt. Lawrence P. Creedon planned to present a 
$28.8 million school budget for 1977-78 to the School 
Committee, up a comparatively tiny 1 .4- percent over that of 
1976-77. In the past, increases ranged from 9.8 percent to 1 6 
percent. 

Dr. Creedon listed items in the proposed budget that were 
beyond the control of the budget makers, including staff 
salaries, heating and lighting costs and state mandated 
programs, all of which make up more than 90% of the budget. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Louis Quintiliani, mayor of Santo Donato, Italy, was 
presented with a certificate making him an honorary citizen 
of Quincy. Mayor LaRaia made the presentation, along 
with Coimcillor James A. Sheets. Quincy businessman 
Hugo Fabrizio, a cousin of the Italian mayor, was also in 
attendance... The Presidential Cooperative Bank, I Granite 
St., comer of Hancock St., announced that effective, Jan. 8, 
the bank would be open every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m.... Cheryl Shaw, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Shaw, 171 Babcock St., Houghs Neck, was installed as 
Worthy Advisor of the WoUaston Rainbow Girls at ceremonies 
held at the Quincy Masonic Temple... Marilyn Alcott, a 
past president, and EUie Osborne, were co-chairwomen for 
a food tasting party sponsored by the Quincy Emblem Club. 
The event was held at the Elks Hall, Hancock St., Quincy 
Center... Beth Israel Brotherhood was planning to honor 
School Supt. Lawrence P. Creedon as its "Man of the 
Year." The event is to be held Feb. 20 at Beth Israel Synagogue, 
Grafton St., Quincy Point. . . Philip P. Gill, Jr., son of Philip 
P. Gill, 60 Victoria Rd., Merrymount, was promoted to 
Airman First Class in the Air Force. Gill is stationed at 
Homestead AF Base, Florida. . . Area clergymen, headed by 
Rev. Dr. Peter V. Corea, pastor of the Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, were planning an "Ecumenical Prayer 
Service" for President-elect Jimmy Carter. The event is to 
be held at Houghs Neck Congregational Church, Jan. 19. . . 
May or LaRaia appointed Simon C. Fireman of 79 Chmmock 
St., and David B. Macintosh of 293 Whitwell St., to five- 
year terms on the Quincy City Hospital Board of Managers . . . 
The Houghs Neck Community Council aimounced the names 
of five Houghs Neck residents to be honored at the annual 
Good Neighbor Honors Awards banquet to be held Feb. 15. 
To be honored are Margaret 'Teg" O'Connor, Frands 
''Shorty'' Donovan, Lois and Bill Murphy and Jack 
Congdon... George Burke, former councillor, 
representative and district attorney and his wife, Sandra, 
were planning to attend the inauguration of Jimmy Carter 
Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C... The double feature at the 
WoUaston Theater, Beale St., included "The Front," starring 
Woody Allen, and "For Pete's Sake," with Barbara 
Striesand. . . Quincy JuniorCollege was advertising, "Lowest 
Tuition in Massachusetts-$ 19 Semester Hour for Residents" . . . 
William A. Horick, 27, of 24 French St., North Quincy, was 
recently appointed a patrolman on the Quincy Police 
Department... The Quincy Firefighters' Union ratified a 
two-year contract, which provided for a five- percent increase 
in the first year and an eight- percent increase in the second 
year. . . Dr. Elliot Berman of Quincy, a specialist in energy 
research, has been appointed research professor of applied 
science at Boston University... The Quincy Conservation 
Conmiission has given approval for the construction of a 
mini-park at Bicknell St.. in lower Germantown that would 
include a new beach, as well as a Little LeagiK baseball field 
and a victory garden for senior citizens. 



N|«6'Vl&'<aHiili^^Vt^ tlmridiyrjUi^aiymiAM 



Ai^TS & Entei^tainment 



Adult Films Planned 
For Library Showing 



Two adult film features, 
one of them unrated but not 
recommended for ages under 
1 7 without parental permis- 
sion, will be screened this 
month at the Thomas Crane 
Public Library, 4() Washing- 
ton St. 

The first, entitled 
"Dreams of Dust," a drama 
set in the gold fields of West 
Africa, will be shown tonight 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. It's the 
unrated film. 

MiKktar. a Nigerian peas- 
ant, comes l(X)king for work 
m Hssakane, a dusty gold 
mine m northeast Burkma 
Faso. where he hopes to for- 
get the pa.st that haunts him. 

In Hssakane. he quickly 
finds of that the gold rush 
ended 20 years before and 
the inhabitants of this waste- 
land and strange timeless- 
ness manage to exist simply 
from force of habit. 

The beautiful Coumba. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



however, is still coura- 
geously struggling to raise 
her daughter after the death 
of her family. 

Mocktar will soon be 
fighting not only to survive 
but also to provide a better 
future for this mother and her 
child. 

The second adult film, a 
comedy called "The 
Simpsons Movie." rated PG- 
13, will be shown Thursday, 
Jan. 24. at 7 p.m. 

When Homer Simpson 
adopts a pig destined for 
Krusty's slaughterhouse, it 
triggers an environmental 
catastrophe, forcing the gov- 
ernment to seal the town of 
Springfield into a dome and 
destroy the city. 

While the family man- 
ages to escape and flee to 
Alaska, they eventually de- 
cide to return and help save 
the city in classic Simpson 
fashion. 

The screenings are spon- 
sored by the Friends of the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary. For more information, 
call 61 7-.^ 76- 1331 or visit 
thomascranelibrar>.org. 




BEECHWOOD COMMUNITY CENTER'S Judy Paul, 
President of the Board of Directors and Executive Director 
Sharron Beats weiconaed Santa Oaus played by Steve Moynihan 
to the center's Christmas party. 



SANTA CLAUS SURPRISED the youngsters at Beechwood 
Conununity Center when he arrived after their concert recently. 
Teacher Linda Mece watches as four-year old Neha Namburi 
sits on Santa*s lap and Sage Gilbert-Diamond (center) and 
Nipun God wait their turn. Steve Moynihan played Santa 
Claus. 



Special Holiday Programs 
Enjoyed At Beechwood Center 



Hundreds of people 
enjoyed the holiday season, 
thanks to special programs at 
Beechwood on the Bay, 440 
East Squantum St. The 
December calendar featured 
various events honoring 



Hanukkah, Christmas and 
Kwanza. 

Over 200 guests 
celebrated Beechwood's 
26th annual Children's 
Concert and a similar 
audience attended the 25th 



annual Beechwood Music 
School Concert. Piano and 
voice teacher Eniko Koyne 
coordinated the concert. 

Beechwood visitors of all 
ages also enjoyed hohday 
sing-a-longs. 



intergenerational projects 
and sharing programs. 

One of the season's 
highlights occurred when 
Beechwood's friend Steve 
Moynihan provided a 
surprise visit by Santa Claus. 



"Too Good to Pass Up!" - hidclenboston com 

Croitin's 

:J3iilJhfU ii)oii5r 



25C WIN6S 



Nature Photo Exhibit At Library In January 



Main or BufMo Sfk 



BUB, Bua uan t ultha 

MTCHEBS SB$i. V.BB 
Kmm> • ATM 







Weymouth photo-artist 
Michael Kullen's nature and 
wildlife photography will be 
on exhibit for the month of 
January in the Colletti read- 
ing room of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 40 
Washington St. 



KuUen, whose work ap- 
peared in a number of publi- 
cations, including Sports Il- 
lustrated and Inside Sports 
between 1969 and 1992. has 
managed digital images for 
MerlinOne in Quincy since. 

The birth of his first 



grandchild in 1999 rekindled 
his love for photography, 
with a focus on wildlife. 

Senior Bridge 

The Council on Aging's 
bridge club for seniors will 
meet every Friday from 



Ihc (JK T FIT Solution presents. 



Kids Fitness Boot Camp 



C crlifiid/hisund i\rsiHinl /////<> s Irdimrs cinuli your kids 

Every Tuesday ^ cV\^^ 

1:30- 2:30 piiV ^^^^^\..5-9 



I .s. \; 



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617-481-5806 







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Skills & Drills 

Obstacle Course 

Team Gaines 

Kid Sized Calistlieiiics 

Muscle Strength Training 

Fttness FUNdamentals 



ATRIA MARINA PLACE 



InJ(.|X'iKknt ,inJ .X^-^ivkJ Li\ iiil: C > 



Don't let weather 
ruin your winter. * 




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IVaveling £xercise Programs 



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Professional Fitness Trainers... 
'Kravd to iiK>st South Shore community area locations 



Instead of coping with freezing 

temperatures and icy weather, enjoy all 

the comforts of home at Atria Marina 

Place. We offer delicious meals, a 

busy activities calendar, housekeeping 

services, laundry, and local transportation. 



But that's not all. Move in by January 31 
and receive one month's free rent! 



Stoat eryaying winter again. 
Call today to schedule a tour! 



For more information on 
the exhibit, call 617-376- 
1301 or visit 

tbomascranelibrary.org. 

Club To Meet 

12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the 
Dawes House on Quincy 
Shore Drive, corner of 
Channing Street. 

All level players are wel- 
come. 

For further information, 
call 617-376-1506. 



The All New 





ATTUA MARINA PLACE 

Four Seaport Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 | uHvw.airiarruxrinc3pbce.com 

Roidency tennt and ■gy^mcn tt affhf. Valid toe new residena 

anif. h^m. become a rendent by Januaiy 3 1 , 2006. to receive 

^wciid c^fcc. C«U Andkca Lanpone, Commiciity Sales Dmocor 

fcr c o mpl e c t dttiik. Not valid wirii any omef ofen. 

— '' 7M_20t16 



sihooi fj/'iuus'w 

All Aqt's. All Lfvfls. All Music 



locrtad 10 iwiw. froa » im y Cewtef 

Give the Gift 
Of Music! 

Grand Re-(^ning Seaswit 

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EiwoH in pnvvte itssons ot Ai Bout Sdnol «f Mmsk ihK loll 
susir Odd avtiiana ow bMMl ONI, MM e( te Oft fodlity 

The new Boss* SfM of Mnk is Still 

convenienriy tooMd ^ At MiMIe Street Ptoce 

compl«K in WajfinsaHi, Ma. We are now on the 

tpptrill ^ qf A* bdUing In a new om) 

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Ouitar, Bass, DrunM, Piano, 
Saxophone, ClarinM, Flute, Otee. 
BassooOiThimpet, TViMnbone, 
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Mmic Theory, Ear Tivning. 
Arrangjag. Songwriting, 
Recording IVdmoiogy 



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•ybursday, January ao, 20ft8 



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Sec I At- 



Maria Graceffa Receives 
Cooperative Education Award 

Quincy resident Maria 
Graceffa, a student at North- 
eastern University, has 
earned the Thomas E. 
McMahon award for out- 
standing devotion and com- 
mitment to serving others 
throughout her co-op expe- 
riences. 

Graceffa, a human ser- 
vices and psychology double 
major, is a residential super- 
visor and family therapy co- 
op at the Bay State Commu- 
nity Service's Granite 
House, a residential treat- 
ment facility in Quincy for 
adolescent mental health pa- 
tients. She devises program- 
specific treatment plans, 
counsels patients during 
emotional crises and runs a 
psychological education 




MARU GRACEFFA 

tal in Belmont as an alcohol 
and drug treatment program 
research co-op. She leads in- 
terviews with adult bipolar 
patients to determine 
whether or not they have 
substance abuse disorder. 

Graceffa's previous co-op 
was with Cascap, Inc., anon- 



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Parent Advisory Council 

To Special Ed Meets Jan. 15 

At Sterling Middle School 



The Quincy Parent Advi- 
sory Council to Special Edu- 
cation (QPAC to SPED) will 
meet Tuesday, Jan. 1 5 from 
5 to 8 p.m. at the Sterling 
Middle School Cafeteria, 
444 Granite St.. Quincy. 

The meeting will focus on 
parent issues and preparing 
for the quarterly meeting 



with the School Committee. 
The public is welcome and 
encouraged to attend. 

For more information 
about QPAC to Special Edu- 
cation, contact Linda Perry 
at 6 1 7-77- 1 385 or by e-mail 
LperryO 1 8 1 @comcast.net. 

To be added to QPAC's 
email list, email the address 
qpacsped@comcast.net. 



Parents of Son 



MR. and MRS. THOMAS McDONALD 

(The Nourses Photo) 

Tom, Bernice McDonald 
Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



Nicole Ferris and Michael 
Bailey are parents of a son 
Jacob Matthew Bailey bom 
Sept. 22 at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth. 

His sister is Aiva Lee 



Bailey. 

Grandparents are Nancy 
Ferris, Quincy; Paul Ferris, 
Abington; and Yvonne and 
Parker Bailey of Merrimack, 
NH. 



group for 1 4-to- 1 8 year olds profit organization dedicated 

on building healthy relation- to improving the lives of 

ships, nutrition and medica- adults. As an interim residen- 

tion education. tial counselor, Graceffa pro- 

"I know there's a huge vided milieu therapy for 

amount of people who are those with mental illnesses 

different for the better be- such as schizophrenia, 
cause of me," Graceffa said. "I've learned that nothing 

"It's so gratifying when I can is a disabiUty," Graceffa said, 

see a behavioral and emo- "it's only a disabihty if you 



tional change in another hu- 
man being and I know I am 
partially responsible." 

Besides her co-op at the 
Granite House, Graceffa also 



allow it to be; you can learn 
to work with absolutely any- 
thing." 

For more information, 
contact Jason Komwitz at 
617-373-5471. 



works at the McLean Hospi- 

Kerry, Todd Ferguson Parents of Son 



Kerry and Todd Ferguson 
of Weymouth are the parents 
of a son Ryan James 
Ferguson bom Nov. 7 at 
South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth. Kerry was raised 
in Quincy. 



Ryan's brother, Andrew 
Paul Ferguson, is three-year 
old. 

Grandparents are Stephen 
DesRoche of Milton, 
formerly of Quincy and 
Marcia and James Ferguson 
of Braintree. 



Tom and Bernice 
McDonald of Quincy 
recently celebrated their 50th 
wedding anniversary with 
their family. 

The couple was married 
Nov. 2, 1957 at St. Agatha 
Church, Milton. Mrs. 
McDonald is the former 
Bernice Tirrell. 

Mr. McDonald is the 
founder and president of the 

Parents 

Melissa Faye and Alan 
Morano of Quincy, are par- 
ents of a son Bradley Alan 
bom Nov. 15 at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth. 

Grandparents are Jean 
and Richard Faye and Cheryl 



Thomas P. McDonald 
Insurance Agency, Inc., 82 
Willard St., Quincy. 

The couple's children and 
their families live in Quincy. 
They are Michael D. 
McDonald and his wife, 
Dinah, and JudiM. Pekkinen 
and her husband, David, of 
Quincy. 

The McDonalds also have 
seven grandchildren. 

of Son 

and George Morano, all of 
Quincy. 



Free Movie For Seniors 

The Council on Aging charge. Refreshments will be 



will show the movie of the 
month free to seniors on the 
third Thursday of every 
month at the River Bay Club, 
99 Bracket! St. 

The movie is provided by 
West Coast Video at no 



provided. Call Ann at 617- 
376- 1 506 to reserve a seat. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Steven R. Striffler 

Attorney At Law 



•CONSTRUCTION 
•REAL ESTATE 
•FORECLOSURE 



268 Sunmier St., Ste 300 

Boston, MA 02210 

617-290-1573 



WWW. strifflerla w. com 



^ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW& OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line ofSuppties 
Free Estimates 



COLLEGE MIRRORS 

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1360 Hancock St, Quincy -617 472 566 



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Children (4"^ up) & Adults 

BAY STATE SKATING SCHOOL 

Register Now For New Classes! 

WEYMOUTH CONNELL RINK 

Sundays 5pm 

QUINCY SHEA REVK 

Fridays 4pm 

Sundays 11am 

(781) 890-8480 

wiin?.bavstateskatii^scliool.or2 






JEWELRY 




I^PlSOn Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCCXiK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 617-786-7942 

January Birthstone is Garnet - Handicapped Accessible 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unity Candles 



RKI.I(;i()lS 
ARilCi.KS 



CREEDS 
CROSSING. 



25 BEALE STREET 
Mon - Sat 9:30aiii • 6:30pin 



Rosary Beads 



^ BOOKS. (;ins 
SllSK . BIBI.KS 



WOLLASTON 

(617) 471-0990 




L 



Just Released in U.S. 

Revolutionary Keratin Complex 

Eliminates 100% of frizz 

Eliminates 80-100% of Curl 

Cuts drying time in half 

620 Hancock Street, Wollaston 617.773.8889 



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SOCIAL CENTER 



SONS OF ITALY 

Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy 

Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs... 

Call about our Wedding Packages... 

617-472-5900 wwwQuincy.SOI.com 



FUNCTION HALL 



THE TIRRELL ROOM 

QUINCY ELKS 

As advertised in New England Bride 

www.thetirreUroom.coin 

Weddings * Banquets * Showers * Birthdays * All Occasions 
254 Quarry St. Quincy 617-847-6149 



FLORISTS 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 

761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

617-773-7620 



FUNCTION HALL 



ADAMS 
HEIGHTS 

All Occasions 

63 Bower Rd., 

Quincy 

617-773-4750 



This Space 
Available 

To Advertise 
Here, Call 

617-471-3100 



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J*ag«f 30>#Q wly| < iy 



TkvrMtx, Jtmwry RiOH 




BY MARIE D'OLIMPIO 




Rita's Apple Upside-Down Biscuit 



We were having a delicious lunch at our 
daughter Rita and son-in-law Jonathan's 
home in Scituate on a rainy wintery after- 
noon. But when she served dessert, the day 
became brighter. 

It is such a delicious pa.stry, and one we 
enjoyed even more than apple pie. 

It's called apple upside-down biscuit. 

In the recipe, you can either follow a 
biscuit dough recipe or purchase biscuits 
already made and use those. 

Apple upside down biscuit 

4 tablespoons unsalted butter 

1/2 cup (packed) light brown sugar 

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 

2 apples (any favorite) 

Zest and juice of one lemon 

1/2 biscuit dough recipe (or biscuits) 

whipped cream for garnish 

This recipe can also be made with pears. 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Roll out the 

dough to 1/2 inch thickness if using the 



biscuit dough recipe. Using a plate or 10 inch 
skillet as a template, cut a 10-inch circle of 
dough and set aside. 

Melt the butter in an oven safe 10 inch 
skillet, (cast iron is best) 

Remove from heat and stir in the brown 
sugar and cinnamon. 

Peal the apples, cut in half and remove 
.seeds. Cut in thin slices. Toss with lemon 
juice and the zest. 

Arrange the apple slices overlapping, in a 
single layer on the bottom of the skillet. They 
should fit perfectly all around the skillet. 

Top with the circle of dough of layer the 
biscuits side by side until covered. Egg wash 
the top with a brush and bake until bubbling 
and golden brown (about 215 to 30 minutes. 
Remove from oven and let set for 10 minutes. 

Now here comes the hard part although 
Rita didn't have any trouble doing it. Invert 
onto a platter or cutting board, and cut into 
wedges. Top with cream.. We had ours with 
vanilla ice cream. 




Kids' Sing- Along 
At Library Friday 



QUINC I MEDICAL CENTER has established a Comfort Cart Program with the support of a 
$6,500 donation from the City Hospital of Quincy Corporation. From left are: Richard Sweeney, 
president of the City Hospital of Quincy Corporation; Karl Ruuska, treasurer of the City 
Hospital of Quincy Corporation; Laura Klint, RPH, Clinical Operations project manager, 
chairperson QMC Pain Management Task Force; Thomas Barber, MD, chief of Medicine; Rev. 
Esther Bowen, director of Pastoral Care; and Leo Newhouse, Palliative Care manager 

New Comfort Cart Program 
Launched At Quincy Medical Center 



Jeff Jam and his acoustic 
guitar will lead a sing-along 
of children's classics for 
youngsters up to four years 
of age, accompanied by an 
adult, Saturday, Jan. 12. at 
10 a.m. \n the large meeting 



room of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 

His repertoire includes 
such tunes as The Muffin 
Man, Hokey Pokey, Wheels 
on the Bus, Bingo, This Old 
Man, etc. 



No registration is required 
but when the first 1 25 people 
are admitted the doors will 
be closed. The program is 
sponsored by the Friends of 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library. 



Student Aid Help Jan. 16 At NQHS 



A college access work- 



ents who would like help in 

Save Gas and Money fiUng Free Apphcation For 

Shop Locally Federal Student Aid 

(FAFSA) forms will be held 



shop for North Quincy High Wednesday, Jan. 1 6, from 4 
School seniors and their par- to 6 p.m. in the school's 



Media Center. 

Formore information, call 
the Guidance Office at 617- 
984-8747. 



Enjoy an upcoming (^^«2J^<^^^^ 
at Sunrise of Braintree 

Sunrise of Braintree is committed to furtherir>g the knowledge of senior living topics 

through events and seminars designed to help and inform seniors ar»d tiwir caregivers. 

Join us to learn something new and even meet some new friends. Meet our team and tour our 

community and see what we do to make our community a place seniors are proud to call home. 

Please RSVP for cadi event or call for more details. 

Question and artswr sessions wHI be held. Refreshments will be served. 



Quincy Medical Center 
has received a $6,500 
donation from the City 
Hospital of Quincy 
Corporation to help launch a 
Comfort Cart Program at the 
center. 

The City Hospital of 
Quincy Corporation is a 
private charitable 

organization established to 
support the Medical Center 
during its former days as a 
public, city-owned hospital. 
Since 1992, the Corporation 
has contributed more than 
$110,000 to support QMC 
programs. 

The Corporation's latest 
gift is being used to help 
establish the Comfort Cart 
Program at Quincy Medical 
Center. This program, 
developed by the hospital's 
Pain Management Task 
Force, is in response to the 



need to comfort and soothe 
patients in pain and patients 
near end of life. 

The Comfort Cart, a 
portable resource library, can 
been wheeled to a patient's 
room to allow a patient or a 
family member to choose an 
alternative non-drug 
approach to pain that they 
believe would be the most 
meaningful and effective. 
These alternatives include 
heat and cold packs, music, 
guided imagery, 

aromatherapy, comedy and 
prayer. Items include 
portable CD players and a 
selection of CDs, journals, 
crossword puzzles, pillows 
and blankets, lotions and 
balms, prayer shawls and 
rehgious books, and lavender 
scented neck rolls. 

"Though they are not a 
substitute for pain 



Stress Management 



Winter Depression 



TuMdby, January 1 5th • 2.*00pm Tuesday, January 29th • 2:00pm 
fay Hospice Service of by Kathleen Hemon 

Massachusetts of PARTNERS Home Care 



Stress can have serious impact on om 

bodies aiKl on our miiMk. Developi]:^ 

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medications, non-drug 
approaches to pain 
management may strengthen 
coping abilities, contribute to 
pain relief, reduce fear, 
enhance comfort, promote 
sleep, and give the patient a 
sense of control," said Laura 
Klint, RPH, pharmacist and 
chairperson of QMC's Pain 
Management Task Force. 
"We are grateful to the City 
Hospital of Quincy 
Corporation for their 
generous donation, which has 
in turn inspired others to 
support the program with 
other items needed to outfit 
the cart." 

For more information on 
the Quincy Medical Center 
Comfort Cart Program or to 
make a donation to support 
this program, contact the 
QMC E>evelopment Office 
at 617-376-5493. 

Quincy Medical Center is 
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An Extended Day Program runs Monday through Friday in the convent, which is adjacent to the school building. 

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QMC Receives $25,000 For 
Child Witness To Violence Program 



Quincy Medical Center 
(QMC) recently accept a 
$25,0O() grant award from 
the Blue Cross Blue Shield 
(BCBS) Foundation to sup- 
port its new initiative to help 
children in the community 
who have been exposed to 
violence. 

"Quincy Medical Center 
was honored to join forces 
with Mayor Phelan and 
Judge Mark Coven to launch 
this important initiative, 
which will promote compas- 
sionate care within a safe 
haven at QMC for families 
who have been traumatized 
by violence, and we are so 
grateful for the BCBS 
l-Oundation's support in 
helping us gel this important 
program luuler way," said 
Ciary VV. (nbbons. Ml), 
QMC President and CliO 

The ChiKI W'llnoss lo Vio- 
loiK c Program al QMC is the 
result of a loalilion of state 
aiul local otficials and key 
le.iclcis in all areas of service 
pro\ ision throughout Quincy 
aiui suirouiuimg coinniuni- 
tics. 

Ihe pri)gram is a coopera- 
tive ctlt)rt of QM(\ the City 
of Quincy, and interested 
health care ser\ ice delivery 
professionals throughout the 
city. QMC will house the 



program and has committed 
overhead support to the 
project. The City of Quincy 
has committed additional 
dollars to fund the program 
and Judge Coven has com- 
mitted to securing pro bono 
legal assistance for the pro- 
gram. 

"Each year, more than 
550 families in Quincy are 
affected by domestic vio- 
lence," Mayor William 
Phelan said. "As a father, 1 
find this statistic heartbreak- 
ing. As a public servant, I am 
compelled to act, and this 
initiative represents our com- 
mitment to the safety for the 
most vulnerable of our com- 
munity our children." 

Through grants and 
policy initiatives, the Blue 
Cross Blue Shield Founda- 
tion works with public and 
private organizations to 
broaden health coverage and 
reduce barriers to care. The 
Foundation focuses on de- 
veloping measurable and 
sustainable solutions that 
benefit uninsured, vulner- 
able and low-income indi- 
viduals and families in the 
Commonwealth 

"Often fairtilies that have 
experienced domestic vio- 
lence are fearful of access- 
ing services and remain in 



the shadows, even forgoing 
appropriate health care," said 
Jarrett Barrios, BCBS Foun- 
dation President. 

"The Children Witness to 
Violence Program at Quincy 
Medical Center will provide 
a bridge for families in cri- 
sis to access all the necessary 
services, which corresponds 
directly with our 
foundation's mission." 

Quincy Medical Center is 
a 196-bed acute care com- 
munity-teaching hospital 
providing South Shore resi- 
dents with comprehensive 
medical and surgical ser- 
vices. The medical center's 
Alliance for Quality with 
Boston Medical Center 
(BMC), formed in 1999, 
brings academic medicine to 
the community. At Quincy 
Medical Center, physicians 
from Boston Medical Center 
direct the departments of 
medicine, surgery, anesthe- 
sia, and emergency medi- 
cine. Additionally, physi- 
cians from BMC who are 
board-certified in a range of 
medical and surgical special- 
ties work alongside commu- 
nity physicians to ensure the 
continuity of care. Quincy 
Medical Center is a leader in 
quality benchmarks both 
state and nationwide. 




QUINCY MEDICAL CENTER President and CEO, Gary Gibbons, M.D., (left) and Quincy 
Mayor William Phelan (center), accept a $25,000 grant award from Blue Cross Blue Shield 
Foundation President Jarrett Barrios for the hospital's Child Witness to Violence Program. 



I found new . . 

ortunities 



"/ was looking to get a degree in 

accounting. I found that and so 

mucti more at Quincy College. The 

classes are small and I get a lot of 

interaction with my professors, 

something I didn't have much 

of at the other un/Vers/f/es / 

attetKied. I really appreciate 

all the one-onone attention 

and assistance I receive. " 

-Moody 





BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD Foundation President Jarrett Barrios (second from right) con- 
gratulates members of the Child Witness to Violence Program planning committee, including 
(left to right) Detective Lt Patrick Glynn, Quincy Police Department, Special Investigations 
Unit; Gary Gibbons, M.D., Quincy Medical Center president and CEO; Janet Powell, director 
of Student Services, Quincy Public Schools; Carole Bambrick, assistant chief probation officer, 
Quincy District Court; Kathleen Bambrick, LICSW, training coordinator. South Shore Mental 
Health Center, Inc.; Mayor William Phelan; Stacey Sylvester, victim service advocate, Norfolk 
County Sheriff's Office; Sherry Ellis, administrative director of Psychiatric Services, Quincy 
Medical Center; and Kathleen Barnett, Norfolk County District Attorney's Office. 

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Davis Looks Forward 
To Working With Koch 



Dick Cahill Named Vice Cliairman 
Quincy Medical Center Foundation Board 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

city," was the theme of Davis' 
acceptance speech which he 
delivered after being 
unanimously elected City 
Council president Monday at 
the 2008 inauguration 
ceremonies at the Marriott 
Hotel, Quincy. He is Ward 4 
councillor. 

Davis repeated his theme 
eight times as he described 
the city's great public 
schools, the beautifully 
rehabilitated three miles of 
WoUaston Beach, the city's 
26 miles of waterfront, the 
easy commute to Boston and 
the community's diversity. 

"Quincy Center is now the 
restaurant capitol of the South 
Shore," said Davis, adding 
that the diners visiting the 
various restaurants "are 
helping to revitalize the 
center." 

"With 26 miles of 
oceanfront to our east and 
the Blue Hills to our west, 
Quincy is a wonderful city." 
Davis said, noting that he and 
his wife chose to live in 
Quincy to raise their family. 
He's been a resident since 
1991. 

"We live in a city that has 
great public schools, 
realistically promotes 
economic development, and 
protects our environment," 
said Davis. 

Davis opened his speech 
by thanking former Mayor 
William Phelan for his hard 
work during his 
administration. Davis cited 
the new high school project. 



the cross-town connector, the 
Crown Colony off-ramps, 
school improvements and 
sound fiscal management. 

"You gave us your heart, 
energy and soul on behalf of 
the residents of our city, our 
students and my own family. 

1 thank you." 

Davis said he looked 
forward to working with new 
Mayor Thomas Koch in 
increasing the city's 
conunercial and business tax 
base, 

"Because of our city's 
proximity to Boston and 
access to industrial and 
conunercial land, Quincy has 
been and will continue to be 
a great location for business. 

"During the next two 
years, I look forward to 
working with Mayor Koch 
to increase the City's 
commercial tax base. We are 
fortunate that the largest areas 
in our city that can be 
developed for business, are 
Crown Colony, the shipyard 
and Quincy Center. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
administered the oath of 
office to the nine council 
members, all of whom were 
re-elected. 

They are Davis, Ward 1 
Councillor Leo Kelly, Ward 

2 Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi, Ward 3 
Councillor Kevin Coughlin, 
Ward 5 Councillor Douglas 
Gutro, Ward 6 Councillor 
Brian McNamee and the 
three at-large councillors 
Joseph Finn, John Keenan 
and Michael McFarland. 



Shea then opened the 
meeting to nominations for 
council president. 

Gutro immediately 
nominated Davis after citing 
his contributions to the 
council and his work on the 
Ordinance and Public Safety 
Committee. Gutro was city 
council president for two 
years, but, under council 
rules, he could not be elected 
for a third year. 

"He takes his 
responsibiUties seriously but 
does not take himself 
seriously," said Gutro, 
adding, "We've learned that 
Jay Davis is not afraid to 
speak his mind." 

"This council and this city 
will be in good hands," said 
Gutro, after the election. 

"I only hope I can do half 
the job you've done," Davis 
said as he accepted the new 
post and an oversized gavel 
from Gutro. 

Councillor McNamee 
seconded Davis' nomination 
after noting that David 
"always takes his work 
seriously. He is often looking 
for that scarce middle ground. 
His charity work is 
legendary." 

Councillor Kelly then 
nominated Jeanne Reardon 
for her 28th term as Clerk of 
Committees with a second 
by Councillor Raymondi. 

Raymondi described the 
"hundreds, if not thousands" 
of neighborhood and 
community meetings 
organized by Reardon in her 
28 years as the council's 
Clerk of Committees. 



Jack Conway & Company 
President Dick Cahill was 
recently appointed vice- 
chairman of the Quincy 
Medical Centers Foundation 
Board of Directors. 

Anthony Agnitti, chair- 
man of the Foundation Board 
and president of Agnitti In- 
surance Agency, made the 
announcement, praising 
Cahill's work in the commu- 
nity. 

"Dick has been a tremen- 
dous asset to the board and 
we look forward to his con- 
tinued involvement," Agnitti 
said. 

The Quincy Medical Cen- 




DICK CAHILL 

ter Foundation Board of Di- 
rectors coordinates numer- 
ous efforts to generate phil- 
anthropic support for the 
hospital and further enhance 
the spirit of conununity that 



is at the heart of Quincy 
Medical Center (QMC). 

"I really enjoy my work 
with QMC," Cahill said. 
"We are able to help so many 
people and its very important 
to the community." 

Through a combination of 
special events, annual ap- 
peals, focused campaigns, 
and other programs, the 
Foundation offers individu- 
als and corporations various 
opportunities to give in 
meaningful ways. The vol- 
unteer group works to build 
goodwill in the community 
and encourage a stronger al- 
liance with Quincy Medical 
Center. 



Applications Available For QCU Scholarships 



Quincy Credit Union 
scholarship applications are 
now available to members 
who are high school seniors 
graduating in 2008 or under- 



graduates attending an ac- 
credited college. 

Application forms and 
further information can be 
found at www.qcu.org or by 



visiting the Credit Union at 
100 Quincy Ave. 

Completed applications 
must be received on or be- 
fore the end of business 
Monday, March 3. 



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Torre Dei Passeri Society Celebrates 85th Anniversary 




A SPECIAL MILESTONE - The Torre Dei Passeri Mutual BenePit Society recently celebrated 
its 85"* anniversary at a dinner-dance at the Quincy Sons of Italy Social Center. Among those 
attending were State Treasurer Tim Cahill and his wife, Tina, shown here with James Papile 
(center), vice president and dinner chairman. 



MARIO FERRONE, a senior member; President Gino Stracco, Jr. and Diane Williams. In the 
background are a memorial plaque with the names of 128 deceased members and an embroided 
silk banner with the names of charter members. 




(11^ ( OUNC ILLOK Dan Raymond!, his wife, Sharon, Dr. Carmen Mariano and his wife, 
Deedoe. 



MRS. FRANCES VENA, Richard Vena, Sr., recording secretary; Mlchele Vena and Richard 
Vena, Jr. 




FRANCIS AND Maryjean Faherty, Michele Papile and Steven Papile, recording secretary. 



ROBERT AND JEAN Pettinelli, Ann DiNardo, Lydia and Anthony Sandonato, Emilio DiNardo 
and (standing) Anthmiy Monaco. 




RICHARD I^TTINELLI, VImcM Mi 



RICHARD AND FRAN YOUNG, and AlbiNl and Gktria KeOy. 



ThanOfO^SammjiifiiQ^r T9»m 



l»Vl9' rfl 



Koch's First Priorities: Drug Crackdown 
Controlled Development • Open Door Policy 



(Cont'd From Page I) 

where we want new devel- 
opnoent: Crown Colony, the 
Fore River Shipyard, and 
downtown Quincy all hold 
great potential for the future, 
and those areas should and 
will be the focus of our 
growth." 

"To these ends, I will 
woik with the city council on 
legislation that will limit de- 
velopment in our neighbor- 
hoods and craft a full 
citywide traf^c and parking 
plan. 

"In addition, I will ask a 
group of citizens to work di- 
rectly with my administra- 
tion to undertake the largest 
overhaul of the city's zoning, 
building and design regula- 
tions in at least a generation 
to develop a vision for the 
Quincy we want today and 
tomorrow." 

One of his first priorities 
in office, said Koch, will be 
to "find ways to make gov- 
ernment more open, respon- 
sive, and most importantly, 
more efficient. 

"This morning," he said, 
"we will take the first step to- 
ward this goal by moving the 
Department of Constituent 
Services directly into the 
mayor's office." 

The fight on drug abuse 
will take a litde longer but 
he indicated that it too will 
be high on his agenda. 

"Mthin the next month," 
said Koch, "I will appoint a 
task force of law enforce- 
ment, educators, clergy, non- 
profit agencies and citizens 



to develop a plan to fight this 
poison that affects far too 
many of our children. 

"There are parents, 
friends and family members 
who began this battle on their 
own. They will no longer 
fight alone. Hiere is no easy 
solution. It is a problem that 
will not disappear over- 
night." 

He pledged faster action 
on the three school building 
projects that "have lan- 
guished too long." 

""We will finish the new 
Quincy High School on time 
and on budget and we will 
work together to build a new 
Central Middle School and 
address the needs of Sterling. 
The time is now, the respon- 
sibility ours." 

There was a little some- 
thing for everyone in Koch's 
inaugural. Even if it was only 
a paean of praise or a plea for 
support. 

"To my colleagues in 
government on the city coun- 
cil and the school commit- 
tee," he said, "you have my 
pledge to work together. If it 
is a good idea, let's make it 
reality. 

'To our state legislators, 
I ask for your support and 
guidance. 

'To our business commu- 
nity, Quincy is ready to help 
you create jobs to ensure a 
thriving economy. 

"To our teachers, we 
value the vital work you do 
in the classroom. 

"To our police and 
firefighters, you put your 



lives on the line every day 
and I salute you. 

'To our laborers, techni- 
cians and office woiicers, you 
are the gears that make this 
city work day in and day out 
and I thank you. 

'To all of you, know my 
door is always open. 

"Most importantly, to our 
citizens, young and old from 
so many diverse cultures and 
backgrounds, please know 
that City Hall is the people's 
house and I am only its tem- 
porary steward." 

Referring to himself as "a 
kid from Norfolk Downs," 
Koch barkened back to his 
father, the late Dick Koch, 
founder of the Koch Clubs, 
who, he said, penned this 
motto for his clubs: "Every- 
one willing to help, willing 
to help everyone," 

The inaugural drew a 
standing room crowd of up- 
wards of 1 ,000 who lined the 
walls of the 875-capacity 
ballroom and included the 
new mayors of Braintree and 
Weymouth, Joseph Sullivan 
and Sue Kay respectively. 

Present as guests were his 
brother, Dick, a former 
Quincy city councillor now 
police chief of Brewster; the 
family of Chiara Durkin, the 
Houghs Neck soldier who 
was killed in Afghanistan; 
and, of course, the new 
mayor's family, his wife. 



Christine, their three children 
and his mother, Simone. 

Quincy's former mayor, 
William Phelan, who Koch 
upset in the November elec- 
tion, was there, too, to be 
thanked by his former foe for 
his service and wished the 
best in the years to come for 
him and his family. 

Four other former chief 
executives also were on 
hand, Walter Hannon, Joseph 
LaRaia, Frank McCauley 
and James Sheets. A fifth, 
Arthur Tobin, was home re- 
covering from recent surgery 
and unable to attend. 



Quincy's legislative del- 
egation was there in toto. 
Sen. Michael Morrissey and 
Reps. Ron Mariano. Bruce 
Ayers and Stephen Tobin; as 
well as Congressman Bill 
Delahunt, State Treasurer 
Tim CahiU, District Attorney 
Bill Keating and Quincy Dis- 
trict Court Judge Mark 
Coven. 

John Gillis, the retired 
city clerk who is now a 
county conmiissioner, led a 
delegation from Norfolk 
County that included Sheriff 
Michael Bellotti, Treasurer 



Joseph Connolly, Register of 
Probate Patrick McDermott 
and Commissioner Peter 
Collins. 

Former city councillors 
filled out the rest of the ros- 
ter, including Peter Kolson, 
Bryan Connolly, Michael 
Cheney, Larry Chretien, Tom 
Fabrizio, Michael D' Amico, 
Steve Duiidn, Joe Newton, 
Alicia Gardner, Charles 
Mclntyre, Tom Nutley, 
George Burke, and Dennis 
Harrington, who also served 
as Planning Director in the 
Phelan Administration. 



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FIRE SAFETY 



1^ Ciqirt^ Tom Lyons 

F#« Pnvetuum Bunmt 
QabKy Fin D^O'mmit 




Keohane Participates In Annual Meeting 
Of Selected Independent Funeral Homes 



Driving around the South 
Shore this weekend, seeing 
the skim of snow and ice 
above the ponds and 
waterways has prompted this 
article. I also smiled while 
doing so while thoughts 
surfaced of myself as a 
firefighter on Ladder Five, 
29 years ago. The smile came 
with the thought of those 
years passing so quickly; 
thinking that there must be 
some mistake in my 
calculation, 29 years? 

In those days the 
conditions I now refer \o 
when 1 witness snow and ice 
covering our ponds prompted 
me to review how I would 
then handle an ice emergency 
if we had to respond to 
someone trapped on the ice 
or assist someone who had 
fallen through the ice. I would 
have reviewed the tools 
a\ailableonthe ladder going 
through the visual sequence 
of options available to us. 

As a younger firefighter, 1 
would often visualize my 
response to certain incidents 
as a training exercise. I 
always found it to be a 
productive adjunct to hands 
on training and made for a 



Ice Rescue 

good review and better 
preparation. Obviously 
preparation and training are 
a large part of successful 
emergency response. 

We had pike poles then of 
various lengths to use to reach 
a victim. We had ladders of 
various lengths, which could 
be pushed along the surface 
of the ice as well. We had 
ropes to throw and another 
tool 1 still cringe when I think 
of using. Someone then had 
drilled a hole through a 
bowling ball and attached a 
rope onto it. 

The theory being to use 
the bowling ball as a weight 
to skim across the ice to gain 
further distance with the rope 
toward the victim when 
throwing a rope to a victim 
was not practical. Being a 
lousy bowler to begin with, 
the tool wasn't an option for 
me. Thankfully 1 never had 
to use it. 

So what should you do if 
you witness someone falling 
through the ice? Act quickly 
and call 911 for immediate 
help. This will alert trained 
and equipped rescue 
personnel. Avoid going out 
on the ice yourself. Often 



times would be rescuers 
become victims themselves. 
As implied above, our policy 
is to reach, throw or row. 
Extend a branch, pole or 
ladder to the victim. Throw 
them a buoyant object such 
as a life ring or float tied to a 
rope. We will often use a 
lightweight boat to row out 
to the victim or push it 
towards them along the ice 
while held by the rescuers in 
immersion suits. 

Each situation dictates its 
own solution. In the fire 
service, it is essential not to 
become part of the problem 
yourself. That is why each 
rescue is unique, well though 
out and performed carefully 
so as not to complicate what 
is already difficuh. 

If you witness a cold- 
water emergency, think and 
respond properly while not 
reacting irrationally. Contact 
those prepared to respond to 
such an incident and assist as 
safely as you can if you can 
do it safely. Think REACH, 
THROW, or ROW, while 
not becoming a component 
of the problem or a victim 
yourself. 

Thank you. 



Edward Keohane was 
among the hundreds of fu- 
neral service professionals 
attending the 89"' Annual 
Meeting of Selected Inde- 
pendent Funeral Homes re- 
cently in Chicago, IL. 

Keohane is owner of 
Keohane Funeral & Crema- 
tion Service in Quincy with 
branches in North Quincy 
and Hingham. He is also a 
past president of the organi- 
zation. 

"It is always a valuable 
experience to meet with my 
Selected Independent Fu- 
neral Homes colleagues," 
said Keohane. "The meeting 
offers a variety of informa- 
tive study sessions and op- 
portunities to share insights 
and ideas, which help our 
funeral home better serve the 
families of our community." 

Meeting sessions focused 
on important issues concern- 
ing the funeral profession. 




EDWARD 
KEOHANE 

innovative service ideas, 
practical business advice and 
the sharing of best practices. 
The association inducted 
new officers and board mem- 
bers, and meeting partici- 
pants enjoyed a banquet held 
at Chicago's famed Field 
Museum of Natural History. 
Founded in 1917 as Na- 
tional Selected Morticians, 



Selected Independent Fu- 
neral Homes 
(www.selectedfur>CTalhonaes.oi]g ) 
is the world's largest associa- 
tion of independently owned 
funeral homes. Members of 
the association operate imder 
strict standards and best 
practices in order to provide 
the public with reliable, 
high-quality funeral services 
and funeral related informa- 
tion. 

"Our members pledge to 
uphold the Selected Indepen- 
dent Funeral Homes "Code 
of Good Funeral Practice" 
and are committed to the 
important responsibility they 
have to the families and com- 
munities they serve," said 
Robert J. Paterkiewicz, ex- 
ecutive director of Selected 
Independent Funeral Homes. 
"It's a tradition of trust that 
Keohane Funeral and Cre- 
mation Service has been a 
part of for 40 years." 



Environmental Tour 
Of271 Sea St. Saturday 



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Steve Perdios will lead a 
free walking tour of the prop- 
erty at 271 Sea St., 
Merrymount, Saturday, Jan. 
12, land that was recently 
acquired as open space un- 
der the Community Preser- 
vation Act (CPA). 

Perdios, who is currently 
a member of the Community 
Preservation Committee, 



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spearheaded the campaign to 
have the CPA passed by the 
voters in Quincy. 

The tour will begin from 
Our Lady of Good Counsel 
Church in Holy Trinity Par- 
ish at 9:30 a.m. and continue 
through the adjacent Broad 
Meadows marshes. 

Members of the Quincy 
Environmental Network's 
Wellness Committee, co- 




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sponsors of the tour, will pro- 
vide yoga exercises prior to 
the start of the tour. 

Participants are urged to 
dress appropriately since the 
tour may take them into 
some muddy places. It's part 
of the Park Department's 
Environmental Treasures se- 
ries. 

For more information, 
call 617-472-0799. 



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ARE ALCOHOL OR DRUGS CAUSING 
PROBLEMS IN YOUR FAMILY? 

The FAMILY PROJECT may help. 

The Family Project is a study being done by 

Harvard Medical School researchers at Bay State 

Community Services in Quincy &Weymouth. The 

study offers free counseling to individuals with 

alcohol or drug problems. To qualify, you must: 

* Have a current alcohol or drug 
problem 

* Currently live with a family 
member (parent, sibling, adult child) 

* Have a family member without a 
current alcohol ot drug problem 

For more information, call 617-694-2602 



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Bellotti Named Statewide 
Coordinator For Search Program 



Norfolk County Sheriff 
Michael G. Bellotti has been 
reappointed as the statewide 
coordinator for Project Life- 
saver, a program that uses 
electronic bracelets and 
tracking equipment to 
quickly find Alzheimer's pa- 
tients and people with autism 
who wander away from 
home and become lost. 

Sheriff Bellotti was the 
first to introduce the program 
into New England in 2004. 
People who register with 
Project Lifesaver are fitted 
with a one-ounce electronic 
bracelet.. If program partici- 
pants are reported lost, mem- 
bers of Sheriff Bellotti 's 
search team activate the 
tracking equipment and rush 
toward the last place the per- 
son was seen. 

The bracelets emit a sig- 
nal that can be tracked for 
several miles from the air 
and up to a mile on the 
ground. The average suc- 
cessful search time for 
Project Lifesaver partici- 
pants is 30 minutes com- 
pared to eight hours for 
people not fitted with the 
bracelets. 

'This is a tremendously 
effective program," Sheriff 
Bellotti said. "It all but elimi- 




MICHAEL BELLOTTI 

nates guesswork in the 
search process and saves us 
valuable time in reaching the 
lost person. And that is dou- 
bly important as winter 
weather approaches." 

The most recent save by 
the Norfolk Country 
Sheriff's Office Project Life- 
saver team was on Oct. 31. 
Relatives of a 77-year-old 
man in Franklin awoke at 6 
a.m. that morning to find that 
he had taken the family dog 
for a walk and not returned. 

The family notified a lo- 
cal emergency dispatcher, 
who notified Project Life- 
saver. The elderly man, who 
suffers from dementia, was 
found within five minutes of 
the first responders' arrival in 
Franklin. The man had wan- 



Long-Distance Grandparenting 
Beechwood Discussion Subject 



Sharron Beals will step 
down as executive director to 
become a facilitator in a 
roundtable discussion of 
"Long-Distance 
Grandparenting" Friday, Jan. 
11, at 1 p.m. at the 
Beechwood Senior Center, 
440 East Squantum St. 

Beals, the grandmother of 
eight youngsters ages 12 
months to 18 years, six of 
whom live out of state, will 
share ideas and "tricks" re- 



lating to long distance 
grandparenting, which some 
find a challenge to their in- 
volvement. 

Admission is free. Light 
refreshments will be served. 
For more information, call 
Maryann Mahony at 617- 
471-5712. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



dered about 1 .5 miles away 
fi'om his home and appeared 
to have fallen along the way. 

He was treated for minor 
cuts and bruises and returned 
to his home. 

It marked the ninth time 
that Sheriff Bellotti 's team 
has worked with local offi- 
cials to successfully find a 
Project Lifesaver participant. 
Currently the program is up 
and running in 30 law en- 
forcement jurisdictions in 
Massachusetts. 

Project Lifesaver was 
founded in 1999 in Chesa- 
peake, Va. Since then the 
program has spread through- 
out the United States. Since 
its founding, more than 
1,610 people have been 
found after they wandered 
off. Project Lifesaver has 
never failed to find a partici- 
pant who became lost. 

The program has been 
endorsed by numerous law 
enforcement and public 
health organizations, includ- 
ing the National Autism As- 
sociation and the 
Alzheimer's Foundation of 
America. 

People interested in learn- 
ing more about Sheriff 
Bellotti's Project Lifesaver 
program should call 781- 
751-3505. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 




HIGH SCHOOL CHODl from North Qnincy entertained at the inauguration of Mayor Tom 
Kocli, one of tlie scho<ri's graduates. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 

North Quincy Choir 
Shines At Inaugural 




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The North Quincy High 
School choir were up there 
with the stars of the day at the 
Inauguration ceremonies for 
Mayor Thomas Koch 
Monday. 

Tim Carew directed the 
48-student choir as they sang 
the national anthem, 
"America the Beautiful," and 
"My America" for the 1000 
people attending ceremonies 
at the Marriott Hotel, Quincy . 

"They get excited about 
this," said former teacher 
Maria D' Arcangelo who was 



a chaperone for choir for the 
day. D' Arcangelo retired last 
June after 35 years teaching 
in Quincy. She directed the 
Renaissance Program for the 
schools. 

D' Arcangelo noted that 
the young pianist. Kirsten 
Shetler, was actually making 
her public debut at the 
ceremonies. " 

"This is her first time 
playing before a large group," 
said D' Arcangelo, adding 
that Shetler is also a talented 
and accomplished soloist 



(soprano). 

As for the inauguration of 
Mayor Koch, D' Arcangelo 
said, "I'm a very happy 
person. My last year of 
teaching was the year of the 
strike. 

"It (the strike) left a little 
bit of a negative feel to it," 
D' Arcangelo said, noting that 
the young teachers "were 
frightened for their jobs." 

As for the current mood 
among teachers, 

D' Arcangelo said, "We're 
pretty professional; we just 
move on." 




Cardiovascular disease is one of the most pressing health concerns in our region. 

South Shore Hospital's Cardiovascular Center team is dedicated to providing 
community programs that promote the early detection, treatment and 
management of these diseases. 

CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH: WHAT YOU CAN DO 
Saturday, January 19, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
at Lantana, 43 Scanlon Drive, Randolpli 

Learn from our cardiovascular experts what you can do to minimize your risk 
of having a heart attack, stroke or other health complications. 

Complimentary continental breakfast and lunch are included. 

Advance reservations are encouraged because seating is limited at this free 
community benefits program. 




Page 16 TlM 






A^^w School Committee Vice Chairman 

McCarthy Pledges 

To Accent Strong 

Educational System 



By LAURA GRIFTIN 

Quincy's school system is 
not just a good school system, 
but an excellent school 
system, according to Dave 
McCarthy, the School 
Committee's new vice- 
chairman. 

McCarthy spoke after he 
was unanimously elected 
vice-chairman of the 
committee at Monday's 
inauguration ceremonies at 
the Marriott Hotel, Quincy. 
Committee member James 
Timmins nominated 

McCarthy; Committee man 
Kevin Mulvey .seconded the 
motion. 

"This school system under 
Ihc \isionary Icailcrship of 
an in\()|\cil school 
coiiiinitlcc has grown and 
siivniilhcncd over the last 
several years from a good 
system loanexccllcnt school 
system,' said McCarthy. 

"As we all know, 
education will always be the 
foundation o{ a thriving 
conuininity and in Quincy, 
our school system is 
thriving." said McCarthy 
who pledged to work closely 
with Mayor Tom KcKh for 
the city's 9(KK) plus public 
school students. 

"Today marks the 
beginning of a new year and 
a new administration in our 
great city of Quincy." said 
McCarthy adding, "A new 
team made up of seasoned 
elected officials will oversee 
and guide the Quincy Public 
Schools." 

"The foundation has been 
set for us to continue to 
consistently provide this very 
strong education system.... 
for years to come." said 
McCarthy, lauding Supt. Dr. 
Richard DeCristofaro, the 
teachers and the work of 
former Mayor Phelan, the 
previous administration, and 
School Committees. 

McCarthy called "small 
class size" the school 
committee's number one 
priority. He also described 
the system's enthusiastic and 
qualified professional staff 
as well as numerous 
programs which put Quincy 
on top of other school 




DAVE McCarthy accepts his nomination as vice chairman 
of the School Committee. 



systems. 

These include a dropout 
prevention program, full day 
kindergarten, early literacy 
and advanced placement 
programs. 

He said that "...our school 
system is in tremendous 
shape. Our children offer us 
all the right reasons to move 
ahead and we will continue 
to advocate for them." 

"A major building project 
has been started and others 
are on the horizon." said 
McCarthy who cited the 
Quincy High School 
construction project and the 
studies for a new Central 
Middle School as well as the 
need for improvements at 
Sterling Middle School. 

McCarthy saluted the 
work of former School 
Committee member Linda 
Stice who stepped down this 
year after serving 16 years 

"She is an example of how 
one person can make a 
significant difference." 
McCarthy said who also 
praised fellow Committee 
member James Timmins who 
has been named by Koch as 
the new city sohcitor. 

Timmins is expected to 
resign this month and his 
vacant seat will be filled by 
an appointment made jointly 
by the city council and the 
school committee. 

McCarthy also announced 
the following sub-committee 
appointments and 

reappointments. 



Dwyer will continue as 
chairperson of the Building 
Needs subcommittee. 

Bragg will chair the Policy 
sub-committee and Mulvey 
the budget and finance 
committee. 

Committee member Anne 
Mahoney will lead the 
Special Needs Sub- 
Committee and McCarthy 
said that he will lead the 
Health. Safety and Security 
sub-committee until 

Timmins' seat is filled. 

Prior to McCarthy's 
election as vice-chairman, 
Koch administered the oath 
of office to the three recently 
elected School Committee 
members. 

This was his first official 
act as mayor of the City of 
Quincy and as chairman of 
the School Committee. 

All three committee 
members, McCarthy, Dwyer 
and Jo-Ann Bragg, are 
veteran board members. 

Dwyer was first elected in 
2002 and McCarthy in 2004. 
Bragg served 1 2 years on the 
School Committee before 
stepping down two years ago. 
She was elected again this 
year. 

Dr. DeCristofaro who was 
appointed school 

superintendent in 2001 was 
reappointed as secretary to 
the committee and Tefta 
Burrelli who has served as 
clerk to the committee for 
the past 25 years was also 
reappointed. 





THE 2008-09 City Council is sworn in by CHy Clerk Joseph Shea. From the left, Michael 
McFarland, John Keenan, Joseph Finn, Brian McNamee, Douglas Gutro, Council President 
Jay Davis, Dan Raymondi, Kevin Coughlin and Leo Kelly. 




MAYOR THOMAS KOCH by virtue of office will also serve as chairman of the School 
Committee. He is shown here with James Timmins, Anne Mahoney, Vice Chairman David 
McCarthy, Jo-Ann Bragg, Kevin Mulvey, Elaine Dwyer and School Supt Richard DeCristofaro, 
secretary to the school committee. Quincy Sun photos/Robert Noble 




OUTGOING CITY COUNCIL President Doug Gutro (right) presents a far reaching gavel to 
new Council President Jay Davis to "help keep council meetings under control." 




JEANNEREARDONfcsfwiniiBbyCHyClertJ«ephSlie«tolier28*oiie.yeM^te™as 



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Tlmnday, Juuary 10, 2008 Tlft« Quixioy fiNuft Page 17 




NEW MAYORS get together after their inaugurations. Left to right. Sue Kay of Weymouth, Tom 
Koch of Quincy and Joe Sullivan of Braintree. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 



PROUD MOMENT - Mayor Thomas Koch, his wife, Christine, and chUdren Thomas, Jr., 
Cornelius and Abigail. 




LOCAL POLITICOS were in attendance. Left to right, former City Councillor Joseph Newton, 
Register of Deeds Patricia McDermott, Sen. Michael Morrissey, Rep, Bruce Ayers, District 
Attorney William Keating, Rep. Stephen Tobin and Judge Mark Coven. 




AND NO ONE could be more proud than Mayor Thomas Koch's mother, Simone. 




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Putting The Freeze 
On Heating Costs 



ASSOCIATES OF THE Grossman Companies prepare homemade holiday gift basinets for de- 
livery to their meals on Wheels clients in Quincy. They recently delivered their 10,000th meal to 
area seniors. 

Volunteers Have Delivered 10,000 
Meals To Homebound Seniors 

Grossman Companies Associates 
Attain 'Meals On Wheels' Milestone 



Associates of The 
Grossman Companies, Inc., 
the commercial real estate 
firm based in Quincy. re- 
cently reached a volunteer 
milestone. Since the .spring 
of 2(X)4. the Grossman team 
has delivered over 10,000 
Meals on Wheels to 
homebound Quincy seniors. 
Three days each week, 
two associates take their turn 
delivering hot and nutritious 
meals to an average of 16 
seniors. In all, about 12 as- 
sociates participate including 
company President Louis 
Grossman and associates 
representing the Brokerage, 
Property Management, Ac- 
counting, Administrative and 
Leadership teams. 

During the holiday sea- 



son, along with meals, the 
volunteers delivered home- 
made gift baskets to each of 
their clients. 

Louis Grossman said, 
"Our company and family 
have a long history of giv- 
ing back to the communities 
where we do business. Meals 
on Wheels is important be- 
cause it helps ensure seniors 
have at least one nutritious 
meal each day, and just as 
important, for many we're 
the only visitor they may 
have during the day, so it's a 
friendly break from isola- 
tion." 

It was company accoun- 
tant Theresa Rouleau of 
Quincy who first brought the 
idea to Louis Grossman in 
2004. 



The program is managed 
by South Shore Elder Ser- 
vices under a contract with 
the Massachusetts Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs (El- 
der Affairs) to coordinate 
and/or provide a wide range 
of in-home services to ill and 
frail low-income elders in 1 1 
communities on the South 
Shore. Meals are available 
regardless of income. 

The Grossman Compa- 
nies, Inc., offers a full range 
of brokerage services, with 
a focus on sales and leasing 
of commercial property 
throughout New England. 

For information about 
commercial sales, leasing or 
third-party representation, 
call 617-472-2000. 



Homebuyer Seminars Jan. 31, Feb. 2 



Mount Vernon Mortgage 
Corporation announces it is 
sponsoring two free educa- 
tional homebuyer seminars 
for South Shore residents. 
Dates and locations are: 
• Thursday. Jan. 3 1 from 
6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Tufts Li- 
brary main branch in 
Weymouth, 46 Broad St. 



• Saturday, Feb. 2 from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 500 Victory 
Rd., Marina Bay, North 
Quincy. 

Pre-registration is re- 
quired. To register, call 781- 
337-2432 cxt. 16. 

First-time homebuyers or 
current homeowners will 





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ing the mortgage process in- 
cluding the importance of a 
I»e-approval and what's in a 
credit score, what a home 
inspection is, what role an 
attorney can play at various 
points in the process, and 
more. 

All participants will re- 
ceive a homebuyer kit 



(NAPS) - A few simple 
steps could help you cut 
energy use and save on 
heating costs. 

In fact, heating and 
cooling, along with 
ventilation, refrigeration and 
water heating, are responsible 
for about 75 percent of 
residential energy use. That' s 
why something as easy as 
setting thermostats to 68 F 
during the day and 60 F at 
night could add up to big 
savings. 

Similarly, checking that 
return vents, radiators and 
baseboards are not blocked 
by furniture or other objects 
will maximize airflow and 
the efficiency of your system. 

Try these additional tips. 
They come from heating 
experts at the American 
Society of Heating, 
Refrigerating and Air- 
Conditioning Engineers 
(ASHRAE)-an international 
nonprofit technical 

engineering society. 

Heating Systems 

• Clean or change furnace 
filters in forced hot air 
systems once a month or 
more often as needed. 

• Have your heating 
system maintained and 
serviced according to the 
manufacturer's instructions. 
Dirty filters, coils and fans 
reduce airflow throughout the 
system, which decreases 
performance and could cause 
damage. 

• Check heating ducts for 
air leaks from joints and 
holes. Check the hardware 
store for proper UL-certified 
mastic or tape for repairs. 

• Insulate your hot water 
tank with an insulating jacket 
according to the 
manufacturer's instructions. 

• You can comfortably 
turn down the thermostat in 
rooms that are unoccupied 
and can be closed off from 
the rest of the house, or that 
have their own heating zones. 
However, do not do this if it 
adversely affects the rest of 
your system, as it could lead 
to frozen pipes. 

Windows and Doors 



1:1 vvl^ REALTY 



1 I.WIN 



Quincy / Norwell / Mazshfield / Dttxbuiy 
- Quincy Office: 617-471-7575 




Compute Reel Estatt Service Smce 1925 



\p|>i .ii».i 



COMMITTED TO rao mRTY OWN ERSHIP 

OF VALUE 




* Install caulking or 
weather stripping or use 
spray-in foams around 
exterior windows and doors 
or in spaces between heated 
and unheated areas (garages, 
basements, crawl spaces, 
etc.). Just be sure to read the 
instructions on the product 



you use. 

• Keep draperies and 
shades open during the day 
on your southern-facing 
walls to allow sunlight to 
enter. Keep them closed at 
night to reduce heat loss. 



Neighborhood Housing 
Homebuyer Workshop 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of the South Shore, 
in conjunction with South 
Shore Savings Bank, will 
host a first-time homebuyer 
workshop Monday, Jan. 28 
from 6 to 8 p.m. and Satur- 
day, Feb. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

The workshop, open to all 
Massachusetts residents re- 
gardless of income, will be 
held at South Shore Savings 
Bank, 1584 Main St., 
Weymouth. 

Attendance at both ses- 



sions is necessary to receive 
a homebuying certificate. 

Topics covered include 
mortgage options, legal as- 
pects of the home buying 
process, how a home inspec- 
tion woiics, and other presen- 
tations from related profes- 
sionals. 

Participants must com- 
plete the workshop to qualify 
for grant programs. There is 
a $15 fee per person. 

To register, or for more 
information, call (617) 770- 
2227 ext. 29. 



Dollars 
and $en$e 

by David Uffington 



Rate Freeze: Most 
Won't Get Help 

At the same time it was 
announced that mortgage 
foreclosiires are at an all- 
tiine high, President Bush 
unveiled a new plan (Hope 
Now) to help people with 
subprime loans keep their 
homes. The plan as outlined 
would help approximately 
1 .2 million homeowners by 
freezing their introductory 
teaser interest rates for five 
years. 

The problem began when 
millions of people bought 
homes with low starter inter- 
est rates, believing that the 
value of their homes would 
me, allowing them to refi- 
nance. The reality is that the 
housing market has tanked 
and many homes aren't 
worth what people paid for 
them, making refinancing 
impossible, just as all tfiose 
interest rates are due to reset 
to much higher amounts. 

Very few will actually be 
able to take advantage of the 
five-year interest rate freeze, 
however. The Center for 
Responsible Lending rati- 
mates that of die 1 .2 millicm 
hcnneowners targeted for 
assistance, cmly 145,000 
will actuaUy qualify because 
of tfie strict guidelines. 

Those widi subprime loans 
have been asked to call 1- 
888-995-HOPE to speak 
with counselors "24 hours a 
day, 7 days a week" to get 
started on die pqwrwcck for 
having their interest rates 
frxnen for five years. 

Here's whit bsppeas wbtea 
you call: 

If you want infonnatkn CO 
fondosure, tfaey will talk to 



you. 

If you want to learn more 
about the rate freeze, you'll 
be told to call your lender. 

You qualify for the rate 
freeze if: 

• You have bad credit but 
are current on your pay- 
ments, and you Uve in the 
house. 

• Your mortgage was taken 
out between Jan. 1 , 2005 and 
July 31. 2007, and if the 
interest rate is set to rise 
between Jan. 1, 2008, and 
July 31, 2010. 

You do not qualify for the 
rate freeze if: 

• You have good credit but 
are in danger of falling 
behind on your payments. 

•You have equity. 

• You have a traditional 
ARM, no matter how high 
die rate will go when it 
resets. 

• You have bad credit and 
are behind on your pay- 
ments. 

• Your interest rate already 
reset. 

• You don't live in the 
house. 

• You already refinanced. 

The HOPE program is vol- 
untary. Your lender doesn't 
have to agree to help you 
witti a rate freeze. If you fall 
behind in payments, die 
lender can still foreclose. 

David Uffington regrets 
that he cannot personally 
answer reader questions, 
but will incorporate them 
into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in 
care of King Features Week- 
ly Service. P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475, 
or send e-mail to column 
reply@gmaU.com. 



e 2001 King I^tfMi Syiid.. loc 



^iinvlay, J«imM7.lO. 2008 



,Piig^49 




1^ 




r 





Dennis Almeida Regional Lending 
Manager At Bank Of Canton 



Dennis Almeida has been 
hired as a regional lending 
manager for the Bank of 
Canton, announces George 
DeMello, senior vice presi- 
dent of Residential Lending. 

Almeida's primary re- 
sponsibility will be assisting 
the Taunton-Raynham area 
buyers and owners with resi- 
dential and commercial 
mortgages, as well as reverse 
mortgages. He will be based 
out of the Corporate Office 
in Canton. 




the banking industry, prior to 
joining Bank of Canton 
Almeida worked as a re- 
gional lending manager for 



DeMello said. "We look for- 
ward to the opportunities he 
will create." 

A graduate of Stonehill 



Stonebridge Mortgage Com- College in Easton, and a resi- 
pany in Raynham. In that dent of Raynham, Almeida 
position he was responsible enjoys spending his spare 



THIS 
ISA 

By Samantha Mazzotta 




DENNIS ALMEIDA 

A seven year veteran of 



for helping customers find 
residential and reverse mort- 
gages that best fit their needs. 
"Dennis's regional 
knowledge and experience in 
residential lending will be a 
benefit to Bank of Canton 
and our customers," 



time with his wife Debbie, 
son Nicholas, and daughter 
Sarah Jean. He is an active 
member of the Taunton 
Chamber of Commerce and 
the Segregansett Country 
Club in Taunton. 



Quick Action 

Prevents Frozen 

Pipe Damage 

DEAR HAMMER: Last 
year during a spell of 



pipes and monitoring the 
flow of water during cold 
spells arc effective ways to 
prevent frozen and burst 
pipes. It's a good idea, when 
temperatures in your area 
drop well below normal, to 



Benefits Of An Extended Warranty 
For Your Heating System 



cold-water supply line 

(NAPS) -Here's a hot tip expenses and repairs. As a of regular business-hour established relationship with until he found a couple of 



for the next time you need a result, some brands of HV AC service calls, and you know 
new heating system: When equipment offer customers the work will be performed 
you consider the rising cost special extended warranty by a local contractor, whom 



of repairs and the fact that plans. The Luxaire 

most breakdowns or Performance Extended 

malfunctions usually occur Protection Plan from Johnson 

when you least expect them. Controls, for example, is paid 

an extended warranty can be for at the time of product 



you 



and can trust. 

For more information, 
visit www.luxaire.com or call 
(877) 874-7378. 



already have an 

Land Records Seminar 
At Registry Of Deeds Jan. 30 



unusual cold, I turned on let the taps drip steadily until 
the kitchen sink tap and the weather improves — 
noticed the water flow was water moving through the 
very weak. Right away I pipes will help prevent 
knew that a pipe was freez- freezing as well. 
ing. My husband went to xhjs winter is ahcady 
the cellar and felt along the shaping up to be exception- 
ally cold and snowy in the 
East and Midwest. In addi- 
tion to preventing pipe 
freezes, homeowners should 
make sure that heavy snow 
doesn't cause problems, 
either. High snowdrifts can 



very cold sections of pipe. 
Because water was still 
flowing through the tap we 
didn't shut off the flow of 
water. We wrapped old 



towels around the freezing cover vents you don't nor- 
spots and poured hot ^^Uly pay attention to, such 



a worthwhile investment. So 
just what is an extended 
warranty and how do you 
know if it's right for you? 

An extended warranty 
picks up where the regular 
limited warranties on new 
equipment leave off. Buying 
into an extended warranty 



purchase and offers: 

• Up to 10 years of total 
coverage; 

• Protection against rising 
repair costs; 



Register of Deeds Will- 
iam P. O'Donnell will host 
an informational seminar on 
computer assisted land 
records research at the Reg- 



' • Warranty transfer to a .^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ •„ j^^^^^^ 



new owner, if you sell your 
home; 

• No limit to the number 



makes sense when making a of repairs, 

large purchase, such as a car The two biggest benefits 

or a new heating system for of purchasing an extended 

your home. Although most warranty with an HVAC 

products are manufactured to system are that you don't 

run at top efficiency for years, have to worry about the cost 
even the best-made 



Wednesday, Jan. 30 from 
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. 

The seminar is intended 



There will be opportuni- 
ties for basic and advanced 
questions and answers. 

Computer assisted land 
records research is available 
at both the Registry and on 
the Internet at 

www.norfolkdeeds.org. 

There is no charge for the 



for both real estate profes- seminar, but persons plan- 

sionals and the public. ning to attend should regis- 

The program will include ter by calling 78 1 -46 1 -6 1 1 6. 



a brief presentation, written 
reference materials, and 
hands-on experience. 



The Registry of Deeds is 
located at 649 High St., 
Dedham. 



water from a tea kettle 
over each towel. Very 
quickly — within 20 min- 
utes — the water began 
flowing normally from the 
tap. 

This year we wrapped 
insulation around the sup- 
ply lines, both hot and cold 
— to conserve heat in the 
hot line, knd to prevent the 
cold 
Just 

know that the "hot-water- 
and-towels" method is no- 
cost and really works. — 
Blair W., WhUe Plains, N.Y. 

DEAR BLAIR: Thanks 
for the story! Insulating 



as dryer and heating vents, 
potentially causing gases to 
back up into the house. Ice 
can form inside unshielded 
vent stacks, so that sewer 
gases don't vent properly. 
Clear snow and ice away 
from ventilation exit points 
as soon as a storm ends. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homegu- 
line from freezing, ru2000@hotmail.com, or 
wanted to let you y^^,^ This Is a Hammer, do 

King Features Weekly Ser- 
vice, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 



® 2008 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



equipment can break down. 
When it comes to heating, 
ventilating and air- 
conditioning (HVAC) 
equipment, you are making a 
long-term investment for 
your home, so you want to 
ensure that the system 
continues to function 
properly without having to 
worry about additional 



Realty Pros ^^ 




Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFariand 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 
61 7-328-3200 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 

Jennifer Kem and Diane Fumess of Jack Conway & Co. who 
helped raised over $37,000 in total for both South Shore and 
Greater Plymouth Habitat for Humanity with their participa- 
tion in the Dancing with the Realtors Competition. The event, 
hosted by Billy Costa from Kiss 108, took place at Lombardo's 
in Randolph with over 700 attendees. 

Jennifer is a finalist and going on to compete in the next 
competition in February at the Park Plaza Hotel in Boston. 




Left to right: John & Anoe Marie Paul, owners of DanceSport 
Boston in Weymouth; Jennifer Kern, top sales agent of Jack 
Conway Quincy; Diane Fumess, Manager of Jack Conway Quincy; 
South Shore Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Jerry 
McDer mott an d SSHFH Board President, Christopher Dunn. 

'^^wav\ JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC J^ 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

www.JackConway.com 

The Largest Independently Owned 

Real Estate Company in Massachusetts 

MA. ML. 01043 MA. M.B. 01174 



CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
617-472-4330 

Across from CVS & Wollaslon MBTA Station 



V 



''^^. 



^r" 



21 Norton Road in Quincy - This unique two-family features 8 
rooms, 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths offering breathtaking views 
from most rooms. Great in-law set up or could be converted back 
to a single family and expanded. Additional features include a 
detached 2 car garage, tool shed and enclosed porch with great 
views of the Bay. Walk to Merrymount Beach, elementary school 
and public transportation. $574,900. 



OnluQ^ 



Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

a When you're #1 you can 

do things others can't 



See all our listings at: www.c21annex.com 



PUfel^ 






QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 



QUINCY POLICE STATISTICS; Dec. 28 - Jan. 4 

Total Calls for Service : 1,121 

Total Arrests: 43 

Total Stolen Motor Vehicles: 6 

FRIDAY. PEC. 2» 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 12:04 ajn^ 60 Presi- 
dential Dr. Past. Car was scheduled to be donated to Bay 
State Council of the Blind on Dec. 2 1 . He went to talu plates 
off but car was already gone. Evidence it had been towed. 
He called Council of the Blind, they denied towing car. 1 99 1 
BMW 5251, color red. 

LARCENY, 9:20 a.ni.. Avenue Auction Sales, 80 
Myrtle St Aluminum. About 1 000 pounds of aluminum was 
stolen from lot. No suspects, no surveillance cameras. 

LARCENY, 11:22 ajn^ 136 Glendale Rd. By checlc. . 

LARCENY, 11 :42 ajn^ Marina Point Condominiums, 
2001 Marina Dr. Past. Employee suspected of stealing 18 
envelopes with cash from concierge deslc. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:36 p-m^ 22 Squanto 
Rd. Paintballs. House hit by two paintballs on Feb. 26, 2007 
at 8 p.m. No officer requested. 

INDECENT EXPOSURE, 1:26 p.m., Caddy Memo- 
rial Park, 999 Qulncy Shore Dr. White male, dark hair, 
goatee, tan shirt with writing on left breast pocket, blue jeans. 
Fled upon approach bad showing from Olff. Barkas. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 1:52 p.m., 1468 Hancock 
St. Caller was attacked from behind, possibly robbery at- 
tempt. 

LARCENY, 2:32 p.m., YMCA, 79 Coddington St Past. 
Wallet. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:45 p.m., Rosecliff 
Apartments, 826 Willard St. Spit on car. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:54 p.m., l\illio's Res- 
taurant, 150 Hancock St. Passenger window smashed 
sometime lu.st night while car was in restaurant lot. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 6:08 p.m., 1468 Hancock 
St Past. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 9 p.m., Billings Rd. and 
Hancock St. Scalding water. He claims to have had cup of 
scalding water thrown at him after dispute about parking 
spot. Two counts of assault and battery with dangerous 
weapon. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 9:34 pjn., 186 
l^fTrail Rd. Dwelling. Money taken. 

SATURDAY. DEC. 29 

LARCENY, 1:28 a.m., Reardon St and Common St 
Fare dispute between dri\ er and passenger which was fi- 
nally re.solved. Taxi driver paid and went on way. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 5:39 a.m.. 
Burger King, 62 Granite St Broken door. Worker came in 
to find smashed window and broken door. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:27 ajn.. Regal Beagle 
Liquors, 385 Hancock St Broken window. No entry made. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:36 ajn., 301 Newport 
Ave. Window broken. Front door window broken when 
owner came in to open business today. No attempt here, win- 
dow broken by unknown object. 

LARCENY, 2:06 pan., 135 Quincy Ave. Just happened. 
Caller's suitcase was stolen. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 5:14 p.m.. Glover 
Ave. Found car misplaced. Located 100 feet away. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:14 pjn., 301 Newport 
Ave. Window. 

SUNDAY. PEC, 3Q 

LARCENY, 12:43 ajn., Bryan VFW Post 24 Bit>ad 
St Pocketbook. Black leather pocketbook. 

LARCENY, 1:10 a jn.. North Central Ave. and Tbylor 
St Non-payment. See cab driver. Customer went into house 
for money and did not return. No one is answering door. 

LARCENY, 1:31 aun., 67 Revere Rd. Cab fare. Bay 
State Tkxi. Cab will take a loss. 

LARCENY, 10:21 ajn., Quincy Medkal Center, 114 
WhitweU St Credit card. Card used. 

LARCENY, 12:05 pjn., 231 North Central Ave. Of 
money. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 7:07 pan., Charlie Ngs Res- 
taurant, 25 Copeland St Past/attempt. Youths keep com- 
ing into above bothering employee. Thite suspects: #1 black 
male, puffy coat; #2 Hispanic male, #3 white male, all in 
teens, attempted to take money from register. Chased off by 
owner. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:26 p.m.. 
Granite City Self Storage, 148 Old Colony Ave. Business. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:50 pan., Corcoran Bro- 
kerage, 146 Copeland St Across from Donut King. Pry 
matks on door. Suspect #1 also charged with warrants. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:31 p.m., 95 West 
Squantum 2St Past State Police cruiser all windows smashed 
out State Police to handle. 

VANIlALISM/PROPERTY,10:33pjB., 26 Buckley St 
Rock throu^ window. 

MONDAY. PEC 31 
LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 8:55 a.B., 49 

.BurkkifhamRd. Past Caller lent her car to her son's friend 
yesterday and he has not r^imed it Calla ^rake to suspect 
he reports he feD asleep and foigot to retun vehicle. Ofiker 
also spoke with suspect; swped staled he would return the 
vehicle by 1 pjn. today. Vehicle has retmned to the owner 



LARCENY, 9:41 ajn.. Liberty Petrotenm, 9 FrankUn 

St GasoliM. Suspect motor vehicle (red) - $10 worth of 
gas. 

BREAIONG AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:09 pjn., 1 
Canton Rd. Past. Mail boxes damaged, appears someone 
tried to get into them. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 2:51 
p.m., 41 ThfTrail Rd. Past attempt. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:12 p.m.. Papa Ghio's, 
1 Beale St Past. Youths in area are also wanted window 
was just broken. All youths advised. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:43 pan., 680 Hancock 
St Window. Several youths broke a window in above area. 

LARCENY, 10:43 pjn., 1385 Hancock St. 

LARCENY, 10:45 pjn., BUckwater Ikvern, 35 Wash- 
faigton St. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 11:14 pjn., 81 Spring St As- 
saulted. Arrest made. One arrest for unarmed robbery and 
assault and battery. 

TUESPAY. JAN. 1 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:09 a.m., Quincy Gran- 
ite Place, 100 Granite St Trash barrels. Reports all the con- 
crete trash barrels have been tipped over. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 6:07 a.m., 10 Whi- 
ter St Caller says motor vehicle was taken by known per- 
son - 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix, color white. Suspect also 
took caller's cell phone. Off. Carthas spoke with her over 
said phone and said she was returning with motor vehicle. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:21 a.m., 679 Hancock 
St Window broken. Caller indicated window is broken. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:05 p.m., IParty Retail, 
100 Granite St Trash cans. Many concrete trash cans bro- 
ken. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:09 p.m., 
1000 Southern Artery. Past. Caller indicating gold watch 
and other items missing from apartment. Location is north 
wing. 

LARCENY, 12:21 p.m., Quincy Police Department, 1 
Sea St Cell phone. 

LARCENY, 12:21 pjn., Wal-Mart, 301 Falls Blvd. Sto- 
len wallet. Caller indicated she went into fitting room and 
when she came out her wallet was missing from her pocket- 
book. 

LARCENY, 8:22 p.m., 112 Sunmer St Identity fraud 
also. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 33 Nut Island Ave. 
No plate. Unfounded. 

WEPNESPAY,.IAN.2 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:45 a.m., Quincy Gran- 
ite Place, 100 Granite St Trash barrels. Three barrels dam- 
aged, one broken and two tipped over. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 9:04 ajn., 
NAGE, 159 Burgjn Parkway. Business. Caller states there 
was a break sometime over the holidays. Attempt to break 
into a second floor office via a rear door. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:56 pjn., 5 
Moscow St Dwelling. Nothing taking. Victim was sleeping 
in bedroom, awoke to noise in bedroom. Door opened, sus- 
pect (no description) then fled downstairs and outside. Vic- 
tim found front door to apartment was forced, possibly kicked 
in 

LARCENY, 1:29 p.m., 47 Independence Ave. Of 
checks. Caller states someone stole some checks and cashed 
them. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 2:29 p.m., 88 
Wendell Ave. Dwelling. Jewelry, iPod, three check books, 
and laptop computer known missing. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 5 pjn., 115 Martensen St 
Past. Motor vehicle was vandalized on Jan. 1. Report writ- 
ten on damage to this car. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 6:53 pjn.. Na- 
tional Park Visitors Center, 1250 Hancock St Business. 
Glass smashed, glass doors broken. Believed incident oc- 
curred around 6:30 p.m., cash stolen. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:07 pjn., 209 
Billings Rd. Dwelling. Cameras, jewelry and cash missing. 
THURSDAY. JAN. 3 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 8:55 ajn., 128 East 
Squantum St Already found. Caller reported last seeing 
his car in his paridng place at 8 p.m. last evening. Boston 
Police said car towed fw safe keeping. Unknown damaged. 
1998 Toyota 4-Runner, color gray. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:50 pan., 3 Wadsworth 
St To motor vehicle. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:59 pjn., Pagnano Tow- 
ers, 109 Curtis Ave. To motor vehicle. Passenger mirror 
knocked oflT. 

VANDALISM/nROPERTY,5:53 pjn., 153 South Wal- 
nut St Front window just smashed. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:16 pun., 34 
Kcycs St Dwelling. Car keys taken frcHn the break. Owner 
<tf car paiked oiM froiM is gcmg to move vehicle fitnn the 
firoDt of the house. Jewdiy, DVD player and cell phone 
known mis^Qg. 

I1IPAY,JAN.4 

LARCENY, 6:2» ajik, 71 Croa St Possible bieak. 
Items missing finom house. 

Q 



If you have information on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quhicy PoUce Detective Bureau at 617-745- 
5764. If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call the 
Drug Hot-Lhie at 617-328-4527. You will not be required 
to identify yourself, but it could help. If you wish to make 
an appointment to view the Registered Sex Offenders book, 
call Detective Chidy Walsh at 617-745-5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention Officer for 
tips or conmients, my direct line is 617-745-5719. My e- 
mail address is dminton@ci.quiiicy.ma.us~L/. Dan Minton 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Sunday, Dec. 30, 2007, at approximately 8:50 p.m.. 
Officers' Joe Paccioretti and Keidi Wilbur were dispatched 
to a business across from the Doughnut King on Copeland 
St. for an anonymous call of a "man with a crow bar trying 
to break into the business." 

Officer Paccioretti was 
nearby at the paiidng lot of 
the 7-1 1 store on Copeland 
St. , so he arrived quickly on 
scene to see a male suspect 
standing against the front 
door of the Corcoran 
Brokerage Company. The 
suspect immediately 
backed away from the door 
and walked across the street 
to the Doughnut King 
parking lot, where Officer 
Paccioretti stepped out and approached him. 

His attention was briefly diverted to a vehicle mnning 
in the parking lot, with another male sitting in it. Believing 
that the males could be together. Officer Paccioretti 
instructed the walking suspect to stop and raise his hands. 
The suspect raised only his left arm and kept the right side 
of his body away from the Officer's view. When the 
suspect failed to heed the Officer's instructions again, 
Officer Paccioretti began to unsnap his holster to draw his 
weapon. 

The suspect then raised his right arm and an orange 
colored pry bar fell to the ground. The suspect then fled 
towards the fire station and as Officer Paccioretti gave 
chase, the suspect motor vehicle immediately drove off. 

As the Officer gave chase, he informed the dispatcher 
as to his locations. Officer Wilbur drove down Miller St. 
from Furnace Brook Parkway and ordered the suspect to 
the ground. When the suspect failed to comply and 
resisted. Officer Paccioretti brought him to the ground 
and the suspect was handcuffed. The suspect was 
transported back to the scene, where Officer Paccioretti 
was able to match up the size of the pry bar with gouge 
marks on the frame near the lock of the front door, 
adjacent to where the suspect had originally been seen. 

Officer Paccioretti looked inside the door window and 
observed a large flat screen television. Photographs of the 
door and the pry bar were taken as evidence. The suspect 
was booked at the station and initially gave a false name, 
however, his fingerprints revealed his tme identity and 
that he had an existing default warrant. 

The suspect, a 40-year old Bridgewater resident, was 
charged with, "Attempted Breaking and Entering, 
Possession of Burglarious Tools, Resisting Arrest, Wanton 
Destruction over $250 and Giving a False name to a 
Police Officer." It is unknown if the male sitting in the car 
was related to this incident-he could have been a suspect, 
a witness or the anonymous caller. 

The Quincy Police Department appreciates the efforts 
of citizens who call us when they have knowledge that a 
crime is being conunitted, is about to be conunitted or 
was committed. Too often, citizens who have information 
about criminal activity or even suspicious are hesitant to 
contact the Police for a variety of reasons. People may not 
want to get involved, are fearful of retaliation or be forced 
to testify in court. 

Naturally, we would like to know whom we are getting 
information from since it helps estabUsh the credibility 
and reliability of the reporting person and every effort is 
made to maintain confidentiality. We do not want to 
discourage anonymous information because accurate 
information can easily be corroborated. 

The Quincy Police Department eiK:ourages citizens to 
report any suspicious or criminal behavior and there are 
many methods, such as sending a letter to the station, 
calling on the (617) 479-1212 (not traced), the Detective 
Bureau at (617) 745-5764, or if it is a drug related matter, 
call the Drag Hotline at (617) 328-4527. A new method 
is to use the (Juincy Police online option by going to http:/ 
Ainyuri.c<Mn/ytf^d. to report drag or suspicious activity. 

Remember, even thou^ you may tfainC that the 
infcmnation you have is imignifkant, it may stiH help 
budkl a case against a crimi^ in your neighborhood! J 



Thiin Min i»,»i nn pH r 3f.4»JWi^b -^qpip 9[^ }¥^9¥i9 }i^ 9 'JHfm ^V^ '»vr'» 



Spcrts 



Raiders Edge Rams, 
Nipped By Nauset 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

Two games, one decided 
by a single point and the 
other decided by eight points 
in overtime, pushed the 
North Quincy Red Raider 
boys basketball team to a 1- 
1 record last week. 

The Raiders (4-4, 2-1 in 
the ACL) rallied from a nine- 
point fourth quarter deficit 
last Friday night on the road 
against ACL foe Nauset High 
School, but in the end. North 
came up on the short end of 
the stick, losing 53-52. 

A week ago today (Jan. 
2), North Quincy trailed 
Marshfield HS by two points 
late in the fourth quarter, but 
a put-back basket at the 
regulation buzzer by senior 
forward Marcellus Lee 
forced overtime, and the Red 
Raiders blew by the Rams in 
the extra session to earn a 
hard-fought 64-56 win over 
a tough league foe. 

The team now begins a 
stretch of eight Atlantic Coast 
League games in their next 
ten contests, with the only 
non-league games coming 
against Randolph HS (Jan. 
1 4) and against Bridgewater^ 
Raynham HS (Feb. 2). 

"The next two weeks plus 
will really test our team, but 
if we can continue to play 
with the intensity on both 
defense and offense we 
should be able to rack up the 
wins," head coach Kevin 
Barrett said. "I told the team 
that playing our game is the 
best way to stay successful, 
and I don't see why we can 
not make some noise in these 
league games," 

Against Nauset, Lee 
sparked the North Quincy 
late-game rally. The senior 
forward finished the game 
with a double-double (15 
points, 10 rebounds). Fellow 
senior, guard Phuoc Nguyen 
chipped in with ten points, 
and junior forward Sean 
Clifford-starting in place of 



BOYS' BASKETBALL 



senior captain Dennis Martin 
who is out of action with an 
injury-played one of his best 
games of the season on 
offense and defense. 

The Raiders had a great 
opportunity to steal their 
second league road win of 
the week against Nauset. 
North Quincy, down 53-52 
with just less than ten seconds 
to play, had possession of the 
ball on the Nauset side of the 
court, but could not convert 
the winning hoop. But that 
doesn't mean that the loss 
was a complete missed 
opportunity. 

"We had that opportunity 
to pull out another win on the 
road," said Barrett, "but with 
seven seconds left, we drove 
baseline and had the ball 
stripped away. It was a tough 
loss, no doubt, but we can 
take a lot of positives out of 
that game." 

One big positive Barrett 
can harp on is the way his 
team played defense in the 
second half. The Raiders held 
Nauset' s high-flying offense 
to 20 total points in the third 
and fourth quarters ( 1 points 
in each), which allowed 
North to almost pull off the 
comeback. 

"We played the best 
defensive half of our entire 
year up to this point during 
that second half versus 
Nauset," Barrett added. "If 
we can keep up that defensive 
effort, we should be able to 
continue to be competitive in 
every game we have left on 
the schedule." 

North Quincy earned its 
second league win of the year 
on Jan. 2 in their come-from- 
behind victory over the Rams 
of Marshfield HS. 

Lee ' s last second put-back 
propelled the Raiders to the 
extra session, but it was his 



performance all game that 
got North to overtime. Lee 
finished the game with 25 
points to lead the visiting Red 
Raiders. 

"Marcellus has been our 
go-to-guy all season long," 
said Barrett. "He is such a 
good player. He rebounds on 
both the offensive and 
defensive boards, he can 
score and he plays hard every 
single game." 

North also got 
contributions from senior 
guard Alex Tragellis (12 
points), junior Sean Clifford 
and from sophomore Tim 
Stille ( 1 1 points, 6 rebounds). 

"Sean did a nice job 
against Marshfield," Barrett 
said. "He has had to step into 
our starting lineup with 
Martin out, and has done 
well." 

North Quincy hits the 
middle part of their schedule 
on pace for another post- 
season appearance, and 
Barrett recognizes that it has 
been in all three phases of the 
game (offensive, defense and 
rebounding) that his team is 
excelling. And that gives him 
hope that his team can 
continue to pile up wins. 

"We, so far, have been 
playing good defense, we 
have been rebounding on 
both ends and our success in 
both phases has triggered an 
offense that can score. Let's 
hope we can keep it up." 

The Raiders played ACL 
foe Plymouth North HS 
Tuesday night, and are 
scheduled to play at home on 
Friday night against 
Sandwich HS (6:30 p.m. start 
time). The team will play host 
to Randolph HS on Monday 
(Jan. 14) before hitting the 
road for another ACL game 
against Plymouth South HS 
on Jan. 15. 




THIS 1957 CHEVY Bel Air owned by James P. Abdon of Abdon Auto Repair won first place in 
the Modified Class at the recent Quincy High School annual car show. 

Quincy High School 
Hosts Festival, Car Show 



Quincy High School re- 
cently held its annual fall fes- 
tival and car show in the 
Coddington Street parking 
lot. 

The festival provides an 
opportunity for the students 
and community to come to- 
gether and celebrate the fall. 

AAMCO Transmissions 
on Southern Artery spon- 
sored the event. 

Many local businesses 
contributed to the prize 
drawings. 

The student council and 
students in the automotive 
program coordinated the 
event. Twenty tables of arts, 
crafts and yard sale items 
were set up. 



Students also provided 
face and pumpkin painting, 
games and a haunted house. 

Thirteen classic cars en- 
hanced the festival. This 
year's winners were judged 
by students and staff. 

Car show winners were: 

• Jay Morino with his 
1968 Dodge Polara, overall 
First Place. 

• John Zofchak and his 
2004 Corvette, Most Cus- 
tomized. 

•Paul Bates and his 1948 
Ford Coupe, Most Original. 

• Jim Abdon, Jr. and his 
1 957 Chevy Bel Air, Custom 
Modified. 

Abdon, of Abdon Auto 
Repair, bought his car when 



he was a senior in high 
school. 

'The car was just a shell 
without a motor or any seats 
when my dad had it towed 
to his shop. We worked on it 
together for more than a year 
to get it in the condition that 
it is in today," he said. 

Jim Abdon, owner of 
Abdon Auto Repair and 
Sales, said he thought it 
would be a good father-son 
project. 

Jim, Jr. is currently at- 
tending Roger Williams Uni- 
versity in Rhode Island. 

All proceeds went to the 
student council and scholar- 
ship program. 







BEST OF SHOW - This 1968 Dodge Polara owned by Jay Morino was the overaU First Place 
Winner at the recent Quincy High School Car Show. 



Presidents Making Noise With 4 Game Win Streak 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

All other Atlantic Coast 
League teams beware. 

The Quincy Presidents 
boys' basketball team is 
catching fire, and, at the 
moment, the team is putting 
away its opponents like your 
Boston Celtics. 

Quincy (5-2, 2-1 in ACL 
play) went 2-0 last week to 
mn it" s winning streak to four 
straight games. The 
Presidents defeated both 
Plymouth North and 
Plymouth South, holding 
serve on their home court, 
and sending a message to the 
rest of the leagi» that last 



year's run into the Division 
II South Sectional semifinals 
was not a fluke, but possibly 
a harbinger of things to come 
in 2008. 

This year's team, under 
the direction of head coach 
Bob Fisher, has so far 
successfully mixed a lethal 
combination of solid defense 
and a lethal offense together, 
and the results have become 
a team that can win at either 
end of the court. And win 
they have. 

Against Plymouth South 
last Friday night at Quincy' s 
East Gym, Doug Scott, the 
Presidents' sensational junior 



guard, it a clutch jump shot 
with just 14 seconds 
remaining in the fourth 
quarter to give the Quincy a 
59-57 victory. 

Scott scored 21 points to 
lead all Quincy scorers, but it 
was his performance in the 
fourth quarter that helped 
propel the Presidents to 
victory. Scott finished the 
final quarter by scoring ten 
of his 21 points, including 
the eventual game-winner. 
His teammate Kenny Francis 
finished the game with a 
double-double ( 1 1 points, 10 
rebounds) and senior guard 
Paris Amado scored 14 



points. 

But it was their late-game 
defense that helped Quincy 
earn their first ACL win of 
the sea.son. 

"We held on defense at 
the end," said Fisher. "And 
that ended up being the 
ballgame for us." 

On Jan. 2, the Presidents 
hosted Plymouth North HS. 
Entering this contest, the Blue 
Eagles owned a perfect 6-0 
record, but getting to 7-0 
would not be in the cards this 
night. 

Quincy, behind a game- 
high 31 p#ints from Scott- 
his second straight 31 -point 



game (he dropped 3 1 points 
on Randolph on Dec. 29)- 
handed Plymouth North its 
first loss of the season, 71- 
62. 

Scott connected on three 
3-pointers during his scoring 
barrage, but it was Quincy" s 
other guard, Paris Amado. 
who helped put the Blue 
Eagles' away for good in the 
fourth quarter. Amado scored 
1 1 points in the game, but 
nine of those points came in 
the final quarter as the 
Presidents scored 17 points 
to expand on a six-point third 
quarter lead. 



Forward Kenny Francis 
added 14 points for the 
winners. 

"We had the best ball 
pressure of the year," said 
Fisher. "It wa^ a very good 
win against a very good 
team." 

The Presidents played on 
the road Tuesday night 
against Whitman-Hanson 
HS, and are scheduled to play 
on Cape Cod against Dennis- 
Yarmouth HS this Friday 
(6:30 p.m.), before traveling 
back to the Cape next 
Tuesday to play against 
Sandwich HS (Jan. 15). 



Quincy Splits 
Plymouth Games 



North Quincy Wins 2; 
Improves To 3-1 In ACL 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

Back-to-back road games 
against the two Plymouth, 
MA high schools last week 
produced one blowout 
victory and one tough-luck 
loss, for the exciting Quincy 
High School varsity girls' 
basketball team. 

The Presidents (4-3. 2-1 
in the ACL) dispatched of 
Plymouth North High 
School, 61-26 on Jan. 2 to 
earn their second straight 
league victory, but fell in 
defeat, 48-40 on Jan . 4 against 
Plymouth South HS. 

The Presidents, coming 
off their big league win over 
Plymouth North, received all 
they could handle against 
Plymouth South (7-1 
overall ). The Panthers carried 
un eight-point lead into the 
fourth quarter and held on to 
win by eight points over 
Quincy. 

Quincy quickly fell 
behind 1 4-2 versus Plymouth 
South, but after a timeout was 
called, the Presidents' 
suffocating full-court 
defense sparked an 18-6 
scormg run that tied the game 
at 2()-2() late in the half. At 
the halftime break, Quincy 
trailed 22-20. 

"We entered the game 
against Plymouth South 
having beaten them 
something like seven straight 
times." said head coach Jeff 
Bretsch. "But we had three 
of our taller players out with 
injuries and they had one 6-2 
forward who we had trouble 
stopping early in the game. 
But 1 was proud of how the 
team defense picked up after 
going down 14-2. 

"We managed to even the 
score at 20-20, and it was the 
defense that allowed us to 
get some easy baskets and 
slow them down in the second 
quarter." 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Quincy, which relies on 
its defense and its potential 
to score quickly and from 
long distance (3-pointers), 
found itself in a shooting funk 
the entire game, and their cold 
shooting ended up being the 
difference in this game. 

"We are a good shooting 
team," added Bretsch. "But 
we shot the ball very poorly 
against Plymouth South 
(20% from the field). It 
wasn't like we took bad shots; 
the ball just wouldn't go in 
for us. If we had even shot 
closer to 30% from the field, 
we would have won that 
game. 

"I wanted to win. but I 
can't be upset because we 
played great defense, just 
couldn't buy a bucket. But it 
is only one game and if we 
continue to do what we are 
good at. we will be fine." 

Leading the way for 
Quincy against the Panthers 
was senior captain/guard 
Meagan Tobin who scored 
1 5 points. 

Earlier in the week (Jan. 
2), the Presidents quickly put 
the game out of reach against 
Plymouth North with 22 
unanswered first quarter 
points. 

The Presidents' defense 
held Plymouth North without 
a single first quarter point 
until the closing seconds of 
the frame. 

"I was proud of the 
defensive effort put forth to 
start this important league 
game." said Bretsch. "We 
pressed them and forced 
turnover after turnover. They 
couldn't do anything against 
that press and we 
capitalized." 

Leading the way for the 
Presidents were the team's 



two senior captains, Meagan 
Tobin and Marybcth Torpey . 
Tobin, who played an all- 
around game, scored 18 
points and grabbed eight 
rebounds. Fellow senior 
captain, guard Marybeth 
Torpey, scored 14 points and 
added seven assists. 

"These two are the 
definition of leadership for 
this team," boasted Bretsch. 
"Both have been on the 
varsity roster all four years 
and both have been starters 
since their sophomore years. 

"They both have high 
expectations every time they 
get on the court and both 
want and do contribute 
offensively and defensively. 
Marybeth is one, if not the 
best, defensive player in the 
ACL and Meagan is a 
phenomenal all-around 
player. Both of them are the 
leaders on this veteran team 
and both are exceptional at 
encouraging leadership and 
teamwork." 

Quincy now enters the 
toughest part of their 
schedule (six straight league 
games), but they do have one 
advantage, a bunch of home 
dates in the next two weeks. 

"This part of the schedule 
will be a big test for us. but 
since we have yet to play a 
home game, we will have the 
bonus of playing league 
games on our home court," 
said Bretsch. 

Quincy played a tough 
league game versus 
Whitman- Hanson HS on Jan. 
8 and is scheduled to play at 
home this Friday night 
against Dennis- Yarmouth 
HS (East Gym, 5:30 p.m.) 
and at home against 
Sandwich HS next Tues. 
(Jan. 15). 



The early-season jitters 
seem to be quickly 
evaporating for the defending 
Atlantic Coast League North 
co-champions North Quincy 
Red Raiders. 

North, which started the 
2007-2008 basketball season 
with three consecutive losses, 
has stormed back to win four 
out of their last five games to 
even their record to 4-4, but 
more importantly, the team 
has upped its ACL record to 
3-1. Wins last week over 
Marshfield High School (Jan. 
2), 68-47, and Nauset HS 
(Jan. 4), 66-40, gives North 
some nice momentum as the 
team enters the meat of its 
2008 league schedule. 

The Red Raiders now play 
eight consecutive league 
games, including one against 
city rival C^incy HS (Jan. 
25) and a home game against 
Whitman-Hanson HS (Jan. 



29), last year's co-champion 
of the North Division with 
the Raiders. 

In their last home game 
against Nauset HS, North 
Quincy senior captain 
Rebecca Goreham scored 15 
points to lead all Raider 
scorers. North took a 
commanding 35- 14 halftime 
lead behind strong overall 
team defense and a balanced 
offensive attack, led by 
Goreham. 

Junior forward Siobhan 
Camell scored ten points, and 
forward Jessie Howlett 
finished the game with 9 
points for the hosts. 

Earlier last week in a gan^ 
against a tough Marshfield 
HS team. North Quincy, once 
again, used solid defensive 
fundamentals and a balanced 
offensive attack to take an 
early 20- 1 first quarter lead. 
The offensive star of the game 



Goreham (38 points in two 
games) who finished the 
game with a team-high 23 
points. Her efforts on the 
offensive and defensive glass 
and her opportune scoring 
helped keep a pesky Rams' 
team fi'om rallying late. 

Junior Siobhan Camell 
(11 points, 9-of-lO from the 
free throw line) and senior 
guard Mary Kate Stille 
(lockdown defense) helped 
the hosts earn their second 
straight league win. 

The Raiders played 
Tuesday night against 
Plymouth North HS, and are 
scheduled to play two games 
before The Sun's deadline 
next Monday. North Quincy 
will play on the road against 
Sandwich HS this Friday and 
against Plymouth South at 
home (NQHS Gym, 6:30 
p.m.) on Jan. 15. 



Presidents Hockey Ice 
Silver Lake, Plymouth N. 



The Quincy Presidents 
went 2-0 last week, coming 
from behind in both games 
late, to run their season record 
to 4-2 overall, 2- 1 in Atlantic 
Coast League action. 

On Saturday (Jan. 5), 
Quincy ' s senior forward Ted 
Walsh scored the game- 
winner on a third period 
power play for the visiting 
Presidents, helping Quincy 
earn a 2- 1 victory over Silver 
Lake Regional High School. 

Walsh's goal came with 
just under four minutes 
remaining in the game. The 
Presidents got on the board 
in the first period on a goal 
from senior Nick Masone. 
Walsh and Jim Finn were 
credited with an assist on 



Masone 's first period goal. 

The Presidents faced-off 
against ACL rival Plymouth 
North on Jan. 2 and came 
away with another late-game 
victory. Trailing by a 1-0 
score late in the third and 
final period, lightning struck 
the Quincy side of the ice 
twice in a two minute span. 

Seniors Andrew Bythrow 
and Nick Masone scored 
goals one minute apart with 
four minutes left in the game 
to give Quincy a 2-1 victory 
at Plymouth North. 

The Blue Eagles of 
Plymouth North broke a 0-0 
deadlock early in the third 
period. Senior David 
McGrath scored off a feed 
from Dan Maclnnes and 



Steve Wight, but their 1-0 
lead could not withstand the 
final Quincy offensive 
barrage. 

"It was a great up-and- 
down game," said Quincy 
assistant coach Ted Walsh, 
Jr. "Anyone who saw it got 
their money's worth." 

Ted Walsh finished the 
victory with an assist capping 
off a productive week for the 
senior forward. 

Quincy played against 
Blue Hills Regional HS in a 
non-league game on Monday 
(Jan. 7), and hosted 
Whitman-Hanson HS 
yesterday (Jan. 9) at the 
Quincy Youth Arena. Their 
next scheduled game is this 
Sat. (Jan. 12) on the road 
versus Sandwich HS. 



Successful Bottle, Can Drive 
For Quincy Youth Basketball 



Quincy Youth Basketball Highlights 



Quincy Youth Basketball 
had a successful bottle/can 
drive this past Sunday (Jan. 
6) during the Sunday games 
at Broad Meadows Middle 
School and Sterling Middle 
School. 

Quincy Youth Basketball 
would like to thank all of the 
players, parents, coaches and 
fans that donated. 



Swim Lessons 

Red Cross Certilled 
All Levels Offered 



weekends stiD 

available 

Lincolii-Haiicock Pool 

CaD 617-29IMNI25 



QYB would also like to 
thank the Great Chow 
Restaurant of Wollaston for 
their generous donation to 
raise funds for the purpose of 
scholarships, gym times and 
referees for the league. 

Foot Screening 
For Seniors 

Podiatrist Dr. Jordana 
Szpiro will be available to 
seniors fw foot screening on 
the first Monday of every 
month at the Council on Ag- 
ing office, 83 Saratoga St. 

The doctor will also treat 
your feet fcH- a fee of $25 per 
pers(» payable at the time of 
the visit 

For mofe inf (vtmrtion or 
to make amqpfxmrtmatt, call 
the COA at 617-376-1506. 



Girls, Grades 6-8 

Despite Samantha 
Albanese scoring a game high 
1 4 points for Tobin' s Tigers, 
the team fell in defeat to JET 
Realty 36-27. 

Therese TrigUa scored 1 2 
points for JET Realty. Also 
scoring for JET Realty were 
Nathalie Pham (8 pts.), 
Alison Bui, Melissa Linskey 
and Presley McLaughlin (4 
pts. each). Danielle Scott and 
Brianna Hiller added two 
points apiece for JET Realty. 

Scoring fra-Tobin' s Tigers 
were Rachel Chu (8 pts.), 
Enxhi Taho and Bethany 
Walker (2 pts. each) and 
Patrice Rusu (1 pt.). 

GuiS) Grades 3-5 

Quincy Fir^giilers Lcx»l 
792 beat United HVAC Co. 
22-8. 



Alison Coleman scored 1 2 
points for Local 792 and 
Holly George added ten 
points. Playing well for Local 
792 were Brianna Cristiani, 
Heather Pettine, Luna Radic 
and Lauren Gardner. 

Scoring for United HVAC 
Co. were Alicia Walker, 
Riley McLaughlin, Mary- 
Grace Wells and Sydney 
Chang, all with a bucket 
apiece. 

Boys, Grades 3-5 

In an exciting, well- 
played contest, Cristiani 
Chiropractic squeezed out a 
victcxy over the Torre Dei 
Passeri Social Qub. 

Richie Ryan and Darius 
Norris provided a lot of 
offenave sccxing and Tim 
Walsh and Steve 
;pla)^ great on 



the defensive side. 

The Coughlin Club had 
an incredible game against 
Discount Self-Storage that 
went into overtime and 
resulted in a 34-33 victory 
for Coughlin Chib. 

John Grasselli not only 
scored but also rebounded 
and had to guard Discount 
Self-Storage's best player. 
Joe Cristiani scored two 
baskets and played great 
offense and defense and Tom 
Furtado made every big shot 
and scored the game-winner 
in overtime. 

Leon Buckley, Shane 
McKeima and Ben Regan all 
played an outstanding game 
f(H- Bank of Canton against 
Covais Law Office. 

Dale White played well 
for Covais Law Office, 



scoring 10 points with two 
assists. Brendan Collins 
played a good defensive 
game with three rebounds; 
four steals and two points 
and Brendan Hill played well 
with three rebounds, one 
block and two points. 

In a tight overtime game. 
Yellow Cab got by Feenan 
Financial 18-15. 

The leading scorers for 
Yellow Cab were Andrew 
Cook ( 10 pts.) and Paul Ford 
(4 pts.). Playing well on 
defense was Anthony 
DeBello. 

Jack Foley, Mike Nazzaro 
and Evan Fienberg each 
scored four points each for 
Feenan Financial. 

The Morrissey Senators 
defeated Flavin & Flavin 24- 
18. 



Health And Weil-Being 

Keeping Joint Problems In Check 



(NAPS) -While may tend 
to associate daily exercise 
programs with energetic 
lifestyles, the truth is that 
adults are often just as active 
when they're engaged in 
hobbies, vocations and their 
regular routines. 

For the 66 million 
Americans, young and old, 
who experience stiffness and 
joint discomfort, the physical 
activity associated with tasks 
such as house and garage 
cleaning. Cooking, shopping, 
decorating and entertaining 
can present a real challenge. 

The good news is that with 
a little bit of planning and 
foresight, you can organize 
everything and still keep 
yourself shipshape and 
moving. Here are some tips 



from Move Free Advanced, 
a leader in joint health 
supplements: 

• Plan ahead. Organize 
tasks in ways that conserve 
energy and are less likely to 
promote joint discomfort. For 
example, break your projects 
down by floors and focus on 
all projects you need to tackle 
on each floor of your home in 
turn. 

• Turn big jobs into 
smaller ones. Do a load of 
laundry every other day 
instead of trying to do all the 
laundry in a single day. 

• Eat right to feel right. 
Many beheve that eating a 
balanced diet can help to 
prevent achy joints from 
occurring. That is because a 
balanced diet can provide the 



body with natural vitamins 
and nutrients required by the 
body's joints. 

• Keep moving. Moderate 
exercise can help to 
strengthen joints and promote 
flexibility. Losing weight or 
maintaining a healthy weight 
can also help to lessen the 
stress or strain on the joints, 
especially the knees. 

• Consider a dietary 
supplement to round out your 
diet and exercise regimen. 
Since the GAIT 
(Glucosamine/Chondroitin 
Arthritis Intervention Trail) 
study, funded by the National 
Institutes of Health, endorsed 
glucosamine and chondroitin 
as an alternative treatment 
for sore joints, they have been 



widely recommended for 
rehef of joint discomfort. 

Glucosamine and 

chondroitin are used by the 
body to help make and 
maintain cartilage, providing 
skeletal support and 
improving joint mobility. 
One of the latest 
developments in the category 
is Move Free Advanced, a 
combination of glucosamine, 
chondroitin and two unique 
ingredients. 

These special ingredients 
protect joints and cartilage 
from breaking down and also 
replenish your joints, 
signaling the body to produce 
more fluid. 

To learn more, visit 



wwwJ 



L'y. •iiM 1 uVi iin.>'> i »yMii 



Survivors: Stronger, Happier and More Optimistic 

Breast Cancer Survivors 
Have Healthier Outlook On Life 



(NAPS) - There is very 
little doubt that surviving 
breast cancer is a life- 
changing experience-one that 
transforms many women's 
Uves for the better. 

According to a recent 
survey of more than 500 
women who were diagnosed 
with breast cancer, many 
women find a "bright side" 
to having survived the 
disease. In fact, they state 
that having breast cancer has 
made them stronger, happier 
and more optimistic. 

The survey, which was 
commissioned by 

AstraZeneca and conducted 
by Harris Interactive, 
consisted of interviews with 
543 women in the United 
States who were diagnosed 
with breast cancer. It found 
that the vast majority (87 
percent) of the women said 
that their experience with 
cancer made them a stronger 
person, while 92 percent 
reported a positive change in 
their lifestyles since being 
diagnosed. Moreover, nearly 
two-thirds (63 percent) of the 



women said they are hopeful 
and optimistic about the 
future. And about four in five 
(83 percent) said they were 
better able to put their Uves 
in perspective. 

"Being diagnosed with 
breast cancer gives you a 
whole new perspective on 
life," said Deborah Powell, a 
breast cancer survivor. 
"Surviving breast cancer 
taught me to treasure and 
enjoy every day." 

Perceptions of what it 
means to be a breast cancer 
survivor were positive as 
well. More than half (56 
percent) of women who have 
had breast cancer say being a 
survivor means beating the 
odds, while half (50 percent) 
say being a survivor means 
being a new person and 
changing for the better. When 
asked to describe the 
personaUty traits of a breast 
cancer survivor, the majority 
of women surveyed 
characterized survivors as 
"strong" and a "fighter" and 
as "determined" and 
"optimistic." 



While breast cancer 
remains the second-leading 
cause of cancer deaths in 
women after lung cancer and 
the most frequently 
diagnosed cancer in women, 
the future does look 
promising. Due to an 
increasing focus on early 
detection and recent medical 
and scientific advances, 
mortahty rates from breast 
cancer in women have 
dechned steadily since 1990. 
Today, more women are 
surviving breast cancer, 
remaining disease-free and 
hving longer and healthier 
lives. 

As a result, the 
survivorship conmiunity is 
flourishing. Today, there are 
2.3 million breast cancer 
survivors, making it the 
largest group of cancer 
survivors in the U.S. 

It is estimated that there 
will be 1 78,480 new cases of 
breast cancer in the U.S. 
during 2007. An estimated 
40,460 women will die from 



the disease this year. 
Mammography screening, 
which is recommended 
annually for women 40 years 
and older, frequently detects 
early signs of breast cancer 
and improves survival 
chances. 

Getting Connected 
Along with survivorship 
comes a strong sense of 
connection among women 
who have experienced breast 
cancer. The survey showed 
that breast cancer survivors 
are more likely to identify a 
great deal with other women 
who have had breast cancer 
(66 percent) than with people 
of the same ethnic/racial 
background (41 percent) or 
reUgious behefs (40 percent). 
And more than a third (34 
percent) of women said that 
they relied heavily on other 
breast cancer survivors on 
their path to recovery. 

To learn more about breast 
cancer, recurrence and 
survivorship, visit 

www.getbcfacts.com . 



Youth CPR Training 
At Milton Hospital 



Milton Hospital will host 
a Youth CPR Training class, 
Saturday, Jan. 12 from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. in the 
Nangeroni Education Center. 

The cost is $25 and pre- 
payment aiKl registration is 
required. 

Space is limited. 

Attendees will learn 



emergency procedures for 
cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) and 
response to chokiing. 

Certification by the 
American heaert Association 
upon successful completion. 

For more information, 
contact Sarah Buchine at 978- 
474-1900. 



Arpano Chiropractic 

Safe Gentle Treatment 
Of 

• Neck Pain • Headaches 

• Back Pain • Arthritis 

• Sports Injury • Sciatica 

Since 1985 

• BC/BS • Workers Comp 

• Tufts • Auto Accidents 

• HPHC • Medicare/Mass Health 

Free Phone Consultations 

617-773-3200 

arpanochiropractic .com 




by AsdnM Wyill 

Blood Pressure 
and Exercise 

a. Recently my doctor 
• diagnosed me with 
eriine high blood 
pressure. She suggested I 
exeixise, eat properly and 
lower my stress levels. 
Although I currently walk 
three days a week, this 
obviously is not enough. 
What type of exercise pro- 
gram should I begin that 
will help lower my blood 
pressure? 

A .High blood pressure 
• can cause heart fail- 
ure, heart attack, stroke, kid- 
ney conditions and vision 
problems. With more than 
50 million Americans now 
suffering from this condi- 
tion, it is important to take 
the recommendations of 
your doctor seriously. And 
although there are some 
uncontrollable factors that 
can increase blood pressure 
(such as heredity), exercise 
certainly can lower your 
risk. 

Blood pressure is defined 
as the force of blood push- 
ing against the walls of 
blood vessels. High blood 
pressure requires your heart 
to work harder as it pumps 
blood via blood vessels 
throughout your body. The 
harder your heart has to 
work, the more likely it is 
that your arteries will begin 
to harden. 

Exercise is important in 
keeping your heart and 
arteries healthy; it increases 
circulation and cardiovascu- 
lar endurance, strengthens 
bones, lowers body fat per- 
centages and helps relieve 
or decrease stress. 

A successful exercise rou- 
tine includes cardiovascular 
or aerobic exercise, strength 
training and proper nutri- 



tion. How you incorporate 
these elements into your 
daily life will depend on 
your lifestyle. 

Your current walking regi- 
men sounds great. The 
length of time you spend 
and the intensity which you 
are walking is significant. 
Three days a week sounds 
good. Try to maintain an 
intensity in which you can 
carry on a conversation and 
not overexert yourself. 
Adding additional types of 
aerobic exercise, such as 
cycling, hiking and swim- 
ming to your routine can 
also benefit your heart. 

Try to complete a mini- 
mum of 30 minutes of aero- 
bic exercise at least three 
days a week. If you are 
unable to walk for 30 con- 
tinuous minutes, break it up 
into smaller sections. 

While a total body 
strength-training routine 
can improve muscle 
strength, it also can help 
reduce your body-fat per- 
centage, which in tum will 
help reduce high blood pres- 
sure. Be sure to focus on all 
major muscle groups, such 
as your chest, shoulders, 
legs and core muscles 
(abdominals and back). 
Again, be careful of your 
intensity when strength 
training. Choose resistance 
that is challenging but still 
allows you to complete the 
exercise without compro- 
mising the proper tech- 
nique. 

Always consult a physi- 
cian before beginning an 
exercise program. If you 
have a fitness or training 
question, -write to Andrea in 
care of King Features Week- 
ly Service, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 



O 2008 King Feaurec Synd., Inc. 




by Steven A Brustin, D.M.D. 

MANAGING YOUR GUMS 

Like infections else- for stroke. These are reasons 



where in the body, oral in- 
fections pose serious health 
risks. This should be of con- 
cern to the millions of 
Americans who have peri- 
odontal (gum) disease. The 
chronic nature of the disease 
is particularly concerning. 
Pregnant women should rec- 
ognize that periodontal dis- 
ease increases the risk for 
preterm births and low birth- 
weight babies. However, 
studies indicate that while a 
woman with periodontal dis- 
ease is seven times more 
likely to deliver prema- 
tiuely, appropriate treatment 
during pregnancy can re- 
duce preterm births by up to 
87%. Both men and women 
should also known that 
people with gum disease 
may be four times more 
likely to develop heart dis- 
ease and have increased risk 



enough to visit the dentist 
regularly. 

We take great pride in the 
work we perform. We'll be 
sure to review oral and gen- 
eral health history and give 
you all the options available 
to you. Your dental health is 
our number one priority. 
Please call 617-479-6220 to 
schedule an appointment for 
superior quality dental care. 
We're located at 44 
Greenleaf Street, where we 
are currently accepting new 
patients. We offer the ser- 
vices of anesthesiology with 
a fully trained and qualified 
anesthesiologist. Visit us on 
the web at 

www.quiDcydentist.com. 

P.S. One fourth of all 
adults overage 35 have gum 
disease, and that percentage 
increases to about half of all 
Americans 55 and older 



^ 



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Moisture is still gathered and plant 
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A/AG/CMAZE.WORDS^FA 



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fonmud. bKkwaid. up. down and diagonally. 

Birds Flight Pillow Shaft 

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^006 Kino Features Syndicate. Inc Wbrtd riohts reserved. 




1. ART: Where is the 
world-famous Prado muse- 
um located? 

2. ANATOMY: Where are 
the muscles known as tri- 
ceps foimd in the body? 

3. ADVERTISEMENTS: 
What breakfast cereal did 
Sonny the Cuckoo Bird pro- 
mote? 

4. NATURAL WORLD: 
Where would stalagmites be 
found in a natural forma- 
ti(Hi? 

5. GEOGRAPHY: The 
kingdom of Lesotho is an 
enclave of what country? 

6. SCIENCE: What was 
tfie first elementary particle 
to be discovered? 

7. MUSIC: What is the 
national anthem of Canada? 

8. COMPUTERS: What 

Kin9-Cro«woni 



does the acronym DOS 
stand for? 

9. FAMOUS QUOTES: 
Who once said, "I worked 
my way up from nothing to a 
state of extreme poverty." 

10. LANGUAGE: What is 
an atelier? 

Answers 
I.Madrid, Spain 

2. Upper arm 

3. Cocoa Puffs 

4. The cone-shaped 
deposits rise fhnn the floor 
of a cave 

5. South Africa 

6. The electron 

7. "O Canada" 

8. Disk Operating System 

9. Groucho Marx 

10. Artist's studio 

C 2006 King Feania Synd., Inc. 



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Quincy Typewriter Service 

SALES - SERVia - RENTALS 

Bob Barker Gerry Barker 

WINTER SPECIAL 

IBM Selectrics Reconditioned 

Starting at $229<>» and up while they last! 

5 Maple Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 617-472-3656 



Slcirs 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) Shutting people out to 
avoid distractions, even 
under a deadline, can cause 
hurt feelings. Instead, return 
calls and e-mails and explain 
why you need a zone of pri- 
vacy for now. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) Although your keen 
Bull's eyes can usually dis- 
cern what's fact from what's 
faux, that upcoming decision 
will need really solid data 
before you can risk a com- 
mitment. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) As your confidence 
grows, you should be able to 
work toward your goals with 
more enthusiasm. Open your 
mind to suggestions. Some of 
them mig^t even work for 
you. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) Reconnecting with some- 
one from your past stirs up 
that old sense of adventure. 
But before you do anything 
else, be sure to get answers to 
those still-lingering ques- 
tions. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
Some people might resent the 
way you plan to resolve a dif- 
ficult situation. But your 
commitment to making 
tough but fair decisions soon 
wins you their respect and 
support. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) Mixed signds 
could be causing that vexing 
workplace problem. Before 
you choose to leave the pro- 
ject, ask for a meeting where 
you can get things out in the 
open. 



LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Your good inten- 
tions could backfire if you're 
not careful with other peo- 
ple's feelings. Try using per- 
suasion, not pressure, to get 
others to see your side of the 
situation. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Your dedica- 
tion to finishLig the task at 
hand is laudable. But be care- 
ful not to overdo the mid- 
night oil bit. Take time for 
relaxation with someone 
very special. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem- 
ber 22 to December 21) 
Although your intuition will 
help you make some tough 
choices in the first half of the 
month, you'll need more 
facts to back up your actions 
later on. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 19) All that 
hard work and research in the 
workplace finally pays off as 
you hoped if would. Ignore 
comments from jealous types 
who are out to get the Goat 
riled up. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) An unfair deci- 
sion creates unnecessary 
problems. But avoid anger 
and move carefully as you 
work this out. Expect to get 
support from an unlikely 
source. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) A fuzzy financial 
vista persists until mid- 
month, when things begin to 
clear up. You'll also gain a 
better perspective on how to 
handle those pesky personal 
problems. 

BORN THIS WEEK: You 
have a wonderful way of 
being there for those who 
need your help in difficult 
times. 

2008 King Features Syndicate, he. 



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Global Warming Study Group To Host 
^An Inconvenient Truth' Showing, Discussion 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



The Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church, 310 
Manet Ave., Quincy, Sunday 
service will be held at 9:30 
a.m. 

Pastor John Castricum 
will deliver his sermon 
"Praising God" based on 
scripture Matthew 3: 13-17. 



Fellowship coffee hour 
will follow the service. 

Cub Scouts meet Monday 
at 6:30 p.m. 

The MOTHERS Club 
will present the program 
"Scrapbooking Fun" led by 
Brigid Morrell Tuesday at 7 
p.m. Bring up to five cards 



or pictures and bring home a 
treasured fituned keepsake. 

Refreshments will be pre- 
pared by Dot Buchan and 
Lx>is Zulauf. 

The executive board 
meets at 6:45 p.m. and busi- 
ness meeting at 7. President 
is Sue Rheault. 



The United First Parish 
Church Global Warming 
Study Group will host a 
showing and discussion of Al 
Gore's documentary "An In- 
convenient Truth" Friday, 
Jan. 1 1 at 7 p.m. in the church 
hall. 

The church is located at 



1306 Hancock St., across 
from City Hall, in Quincy 
Center. 

The public is invited to 
attend. 

Refreshments will be 
served. 

The group will also dis- 
cuss the formation of an in- 



terfaith coalition of places or 
worship in Quincy and other 
South Shore communities to 
work on local environmen- 
tal issues. 

For more information 
about Friday's viewing and 
discussion, contact Pat 
Sulbvan at 781-337-5823. 



Quincy Community United Methodist 



Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston, will 
have Sunday worship and 
Sunday school beginning at 
10:30 a.m. 

Adult Bible study begins 
at 9 a.m. 



The lector will be Norman 
Givens. Ushers are Paul and 
Linda DelGreco. 

Coffee hour hosts are 
Margaret Buckley, Susan 
Little and Agnes Williams. 

All are welcome. The 
church is handicapped acces- 



sible. 

Family Movie Night Sat- 
urday, Jan. 19 at 6 p.m. will 
feature the film 

"Ratatouille." Free admis- 
sion, popcorn and soda. 

For more information, call 
the church at 617-773-3319. 



Catholic Women's Prayer Group 

The Quincy Catholic Jan. 15 from 7 to 8:15 p.m. shared by those who gather. 

Women's Prayer Group in- at St. Joseph Rectory. For more information, 

vites the public to join in The group will be using contact Sister Pat Boyle at 

prayer on the third Tuesday the prayer method of Lectio 6 1 7-479-5400 or Dorothy 

of every month. Di vina where Sacred Scrip- Ruggiero at 6 1 7-472-632 1 . 

The next gathering will be ture is read, reflected on and 

Bethany Congregational Church 



Quincy Point Congregational 

Quincy Point Congrega- Voice from Heaven." She in fellowship hall, 

tional Church, 444 Washing- will be joined by Sherri Pitts The church is planning its 

ton St., will have worship as Deacon of the Day. fourth annual Mardi Gras 

Sunday beginning at 10 a.m. Following the service Saturday, Feb. 2 from 6 to 10 

The Rev. Ann G. there will be coffee, light re- p.m. 

Suzedell's sermon will be "A frvshments and conversation 

Free Senior Medical Trips 

Medical transportation The service requires two major hospitals in Boston, 

with curb to curb service weeks notice for trips, in- jo request a trip, call the 

Mondays through Fridays is eluding those to Braintree Transportation Ofi&ce at 6 1 7- 

provided at no cost to Quincy Hospital, Carney Hospital, 376-1242 

seniors. Milton Hospital and eight 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, 1 8 Spear St., Quincy 
Center, will have a Worship 
Service and Church School 
at 10 a.m. 

The Rev. William C. 
Harding will conduct the ser- 



vice and preach a sermon ship time in the Allen Parlor, 

entitled "Seek the Kingdom Light refreshments will be 

of God." served. 

Childcare is available for All are welcome, 

infants and toddlers. The church is handi- 

Following the worship capped accessible, 
service, there will be fellow- 



Winter Storytimes Registration Jan. 11 

Registration for Winter rently attending storytimes one storytime and must be of 

Storytimes and Elementary are asked to wait until Satur- age at the first meeting. 

Explorations will begin Fri- day, Jan. 12, to register to For program details, pick 

day, Jan. 11, at 9 a.m. at the allow as many kids as pos- up a schedule at any library 

Thomas Crane Public Li- sible to participate. location or check the Ubrary 

braiy, 40 Washington St. Registration is limited to website at http:// 

Youngsters ages four Quincy residents only. Each thomascranelibrary.org. 

months to seven years cur- child may register for only 



ISB^^hmgion 5t., Quincy 
phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Selv^n Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Conteniporary Worship 
m •Marriage & Family Group 
■i •International Fellowship 



UUtCU 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 617-773-O120 

Masses 

Saturday. 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Memt>ers Welcomel 



— I^mw^^^ 



UNITED RRST PARISH CHURCH 
1306 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-773-1290 

www.ufpc.org 

Sunday Worship 10:30 am 

We are a welcoming Congregation 



First Church of Squantum 

164 Bellevue St. • 617-328-6649 

Pastor: Michael S. Robertson 

Co-Pastor: Dr. Emmy Robertson 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

All Are Welcome 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-773-6424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell. Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



To Advertise 

in this Directory, 

Call 617-471 -3100 



t^taix ^ja^irvcioru 



si:iiM( i:s & \crn iriiis 




Sacred Heart Church 

'A Romat) CaltnSc Community walking together 

in Faiitt, Worstiip, Education and Sennce' 

386 Hancock SL, North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

HarKiicapped Accessit)le 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 




St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 9am 
CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., 
Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday (Vigil Mass) 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m. 
and 1 1 a.m. (Family Liturgy) 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
Handicapped Accessible 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock SL,Wollafton 

•61747»5400 

Pastor: Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 
Sunday 7:00, 9:00, 1 1 :30AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 
Handiaipped Chakm AviO^yle 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 
617-479-8778 • www.hn(x>ng.org 

Worship Service and 
Sunday School at 9:30 am 

Baptism of Our Lord Sunday 

'Praising God' 
Rev. John Castricum 




Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 

Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

10 a.m. Worship Service 

and Church School 

Rev. William C. Harding 

*Seek the Kingdom of God' 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 

Following Worship Service 

Wheelchair Accessible 



Cluriitfan Sdenee 




First Church of 
Ghriat, Scientist 

10:30 AM 

SamdUty Serricc ft Swmivy Sdwdl 

7:30 PM 

Wedacsday Bveaiaf Mvctfaig 

20 Greenleaf Street Qnincy 

dff Hancock St. 

617-472-0055 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

United Church of Christ 

48 Winthrop Ave. • 617-773-7432 

Pastor: Rev. Mary Lou GIfford 

Sunday Worship at 10 a.m. 

Rev. Mary Louise Gilford, 

Ellen Brady, 

Seminarian Studen, Preaching 

Sermon: 'Be Loved' 



UNION CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.Wollaston 

(617)479-6661 

Sunday Worship Sen/ice 

10 AM 
Rev. John Swanson. Pastor 



Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston 
(617)472-5669 
On The Campus Of y^iS^ 
Eastern Nazarene College 

Pastor: Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sunday Services 

8:30 am ■ Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children's 

Sunday School 

1 1 a.m. - Blended Worship Sen/ice 

Come Worship with Us! 




St. Chrysostom*s 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts., Quincy 

(617) 472-0737 • WKnfr.stclirysostom.con) 

Rev. David Hefling 

Sunday Eucharist 10 aja. 

Sonday School 9:30 ajB. 

WedncMiay Eucharist 8:30 am 

Norsery Care during Service 

Coffee Hour FoOowiag 

ALL WELCOME 

THRIFT SHOP hours W, Hi, Fr. 104 J 



EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF ATLANTIC 
65 Newbury Ave. North Quincy 

(617) 847-4444 • 

Interim Pastor Wayne Eart 

10:30 Sunday Wonhip 

Sermon: 'Kingdom Uving' 

TPIill Brazilian A/G SerWc* 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

50 Hucldns Ave., Squantum 
617-773-5878 • Pastor Mke Fehan 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. • Gospel of Matthew 

Children's Class 10 a.m. 

Bible Discussion Group Wed. 7:45 p.m. 

Handicap Accessible 

email: info@SQuantumd.org 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston^ 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr. Susan Jarel<-Glidd0n, Pastor 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St, Quincy • 617-472-2345\ 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND N4USIC 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



GOOD SHEPHERD 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

308 West Squantum Street 

No. Quincy, MA 02171 

617-328-8348 

The Rev. Nathan D. Pipho 

10:30 a.m. Hdy Comnmnlon Sunday 
6:30 pm Wednesday Night Bible Study, FeNowsh^ 



P«f«a6 rTtfm-iiwkmaW'ihfm^ ^Itmtt^yfJmmrfJ^Tm^ 



CCITDAI^IES 



Francis L. Phelan, Jr., 73 

Retired U. S. Postal Service Worker 



Bridget Mannix 

Homemaker 



Joanne M. Johnson, 75 

Homemaker 



A funeral Mass for Francis 
L. "Frank" Phelan, Jr.. 73, of 
Quincy, formerly of Hull, a 
retired U.S. Postal Service 
employee, was celebrated 
Jan. 2 in Saint John the Bap- 
tist Church. Quincy. 

Mr. Phelan died Dec. 27 
at home. 

Bom in Cambridge, he 
lived in Hull for many years 
before moving to Quincy in 
1993. 

A U.S. Army veteran of 
the Korean War, he worked 
for the U.S. Postal Service in 
Cambridge and Weymouth 
before retiring in 1993. 

He was a member of the 
VFW Post in Hull. 

Beloved husband of the 
late Rosemarie "Rose" 
( Fit/gerald) Phelan. he is sur- 
vived by his children. John 
()' Bricii ofQuincy, Veronica 
O'Brien of California. Karen 



Roche of Quincy, Loretta 
Tower of Hull, Francis L. 
Phelan HI of Weymouth, 
Patricia M. St. Martin of 
Abington, Wendy Bozza of 
Norfolk and Lisa Shaw of 
Oswego, N.Y.; 12 grandchil- 
dren and one great-grandchil- 
dren. 

He is also survived by his 
brother, Richard Phelan and 
three sisters. Phyllis Phelan. 
Ann O'Heam and Loretta 
Bailey. 

Burial with military hon- 
ors was in National Cem- 
etery. Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Flm St.. Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Salvation 
Army, 6 Baxter St., Quincy. 
MA 02169. 



Paul J. Fucile 



Former Owner 

A tiincral Mass for Paul J. 
"luie" Fucile t)f Marina Bay, 
formerly of Milton and South 
Boston, a former gift shop 
owner, was celebrated Mon- 
day in Gate of Heaven 
Church. 

Mr. Fucile died Jan. 2. 

He was the former owner 
of Village Gift Shop, Marina 
Bay. 

He was also a retired em- 
ployee of the Gillette Corp. 

A member of the "L" 
Street Running Club, he suc- 
cessfully completed The Bos- 
ton Marathon 10 consecu- 
tive years. 

Mr. Fucile was also a 
board member of the Ron 
Burton Training Village. 

Beloved husband of 



Village Gift Shop 

Catherine Holley Fucile. he 
was the loving son of the late 
Peter and Henrietta (Corradi) 
Fucile. 

He was the loving father 
of Paul Dalton and her hus- 
band Francis of Quincy. An- 
thony Fucile and his wife, 
Amanda of Dorchester and 
Nicholas Fucile of South 
Boston. 

He was the loving brother 
of Ronald Fucile and his wife 
Beverly of Walpole. 

He is also survived by 
three grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to The Ron Burton 
Training Village, P.O. Box 
2, Hubbardsten, MA 01452. 



ATkouetiT 



^^^TA A wit (NKe remarked that the niim- 

^^^^^jj^^L ber of times the average man says no 

^^^Hh^^^H to temptation is once weakly! ... It 

^^^Hj^^^^H has also been said that the dtfTerence 

^^mH^H between those whom the world es- 

SCOTT DEWARE teems as good, and those whom it 
condenms as bad, is in many cases 
little else than that the former have been better sheltered 
from temptation. . . 

Everyone of us at sometime in our lives go through the 
experience of temptation. Temptation is a trial. Have you 
ever noticed that a lot of times temptation seems to be 
directed at those ptunts In our lives where we seon least able 
to withstand. "Lead us not into temptation" is sunply the 
petition that God will keep us free from the trial of tempta- 
tion. God never tempts anyone. We tempt ourselves. 

A life without temptation and trial would appear to be an 
ideal existence. But is this true? We don*t thmk so. .. We all 
need to stand before the hard situations of life if we are going 
to get out of life the blessings it promises. 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Servi^ Available 

A Sen ice Family AffiUaU cfAFFS and Servibe Corp. Int 
492 Rock Street • FaU River, MA 02720 » i5(») 676-2454 




<L/ OAfefw,,,/ 



A funeral Mass for 
Bridget "Birdie" (Cronin) 
Mannix of Quincy, a home- 
maker, was celebrated Jan. 2 
in Sacred Heart Church, 
North Quincy. 

Mrs. Mannix died Dec. 
29. 

She was an active mem- 
ber of the Sacred Heart La- 
dies Sodality. 

Wife of the late John F. 
Mannix, she was the daugh- 
ter of the late Phihp and Lena 
(Casey) Cronin, native of 
Millstreet, County Cork, Ire- 
land. 

She is survived by her 
children, Paul Mannix, M. 
Patricia Gavin and Sheila and 
her husband Thomas Bell all 
of Quincy, Philip Mannix and 
his wife Joellen of 
Marshfield, Eileen and her 
husband Richard O'Brien of 
Weymouth and Noreen and 
her husband Martin Millane 
of Belmont; three sisters. 
Sheila O'Callaghan, Marga- 
ret Linehan and Theresa 




BRIDGET MANNIX 

Sheehan, all of Ireland; 12 
grandchildren and 2 great- 
grandchildren. 

She was also the sister of 
the late Jeremiah, Nora, 
Daniel, Mary, Gobnait 
Cronin and Helen Walsh. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 Hancock 
St., North Quincy. 



A funeral Mass for Joanne 
M. Johnson, 75, of Quincy, a 
homemaker, was celebrated 
Dec. 31 in Saint Ann's 
Church, 757 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Johnson died Dec. 
28 at home after a long ill- 
ness. 

Bom in Newton, she was 
raised in Cambridge and at- 
tended Cambridge schools. 
She was a graduate of Cam- 
bridge Rindge and Latin High 
School and the Catherine 
Gibbs Secretarial School. 

She had lived in Quincy 
for 50 years. 

Mrs. Johnson was a vol- 
unteer at Milton Hospital for 
many years. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Micheal Johnson of 
Quincy; four children, Brian 
P. Johnson, Kevin G. 
Johnson, Barry M. Johnson 
and Karen M. Conneely, all 
of Quincy; and three grand- 




JOANNE M. JOHNSON 

children. 

Interment was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Saint Ann's 
Church, c/o 757 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02170. 



Roberta Ruth Halsey, 71 

Retired Bank Clerk 



Sharon E. Sager 

Administrative Manager 



A funeral Mass for 
Roberta Ruth Halsey, 71, of 
Houghs Neck, a retired bank 
clerk, was celebrated Jan. 2 
at the Holy Trinity Parish - 
Blessed Sacrament Church, 
1000 Sea St., Houghs Neck. 

Ms. HaJsey died Dec. 28 
at home. 

Bom at Newburg, N.Y., 
she had lived in Maiden be- 
fore moving to Quincy 40 
years ago. 

She was a retired clerk for 
the State Street Bank and had 
been a claims processor. 

She was a communicant 
of Holy Trinity Parish at 
Blessed Sacrament Church. 

She was a supporter of 
animal causes including the 
Humane Society and the So- 



ciety for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals. 

She was a lover of cats. 

She is survived by a 
daughter, Maribeth Knox of 
Scituate; a brother, Sterling 
E. Halsey of Bowdoinham, 
ME; a sister-in-law, Beverly 
Halsey of Kansas; two grand- 
children and two great-grand- 
children; and five nieces and 
nephews and several grand- 
nieces and grandnephews. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Mortimer 
N. Peck-Russell Peck Fu- 
neral Home, Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Quincy Ani- 
mal Shelter, 56 Broad St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 




Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

clifTords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



Funeral services for 
Sharon E. Sager of Quincy, 
an administrative manager, 
were held Jan. 4 in the Good 
Shepherd Lutheran Church, 
308 West Squantum St., 
North Quincy. 

Miss Sager died Dec. 30 
at Tufts-New England Medi- 
cal Center after a long illness 
with lung cancer, sclero- 
derma, and pulmonary arte- 
rial hypertension. 

Bom in Baltimore, MD, 
she had lived in Quincy for 
many years. 

She was a graduate of 
North Quincy High School 
and Lesley College. 

She was an adininistra- 
tive manager of Urology and 
ENT at N.E. Medical Center 
and Dept. of Conmiunity 
Health and Family Medicine 
at Tufts Medical School for 
16 years. 

Miss Sager was an avid 
golfer and a member of 
Wollaston Golf Club. She 
also enjoyed water skiing and 

Robert 



snow skiing. 

Beloved daughter of 
Audrey (Rust) Sager of 
Quincy and the late Harold 
Sager, she is survived by a 
brother, Stephen B. Sager and 
his wife, Lynne of Kiawah 
Island, S.C. 

She was also the aunt of 
Kurt Sager and his wife, Dana 
of Stoughton, Stephen B. 
Sager, Jr. of Johns Island, 
S.C, Lt. Commander Eric 
Sager, U.S. Navy, and his 
wife, Moira of Femandina 
Beach, Fla. and Melissa 
Sager of MA. 

She is also survived by 
several great-nieces and 
great-nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Cartwright- 
Venuti Funeral Home, 
Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Good Shepherd 
Lutheran Church, 308 West 
Squantum St., Quincy, MA 
02171. 

M . Luisi 



Retired BoUermaker 

Private funeral services Bom and raised in Quincy, 

were held for Robert M. he graduated from Quincy 
Luisi, 70, of Bullhead City, High School in 1954. 



Ariz., formerly of Quincy and 
California, who died recently 
at home. 



Funerals • Cremations • Prearrangements 




DENNIS SWEENEY FUNERAL HOME 

Quincy 's First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney 

Funeral Director 
74 Elm Street, Quincy Massachusetts 02169 • 617-773-2728 

www.denmssweeneyfuneraIhome.com 



Mr. Luisi was aU.S. Navy 
veteran. 

He moved away 40 years 
ago and worked as a boiler- 
maker before retiring in 2000. 

Son of the late Frank and 
Florence (Deveau) Luisi, he 
is survived by his loving 
daughters, Denise Taylor of 
BuUhead City, Ariz., Donna 
McMurray of Jasper, Ala. and 
Debbie Haston of Citrus 
Heights, Calif.; a brother, 
Frank Luisi and his wife 
Kathy of Pembroke; three 
grandchildren and many 
nieces, nephews and cous- 
ins. 

He was also the grandfa- 
ther of the late James Robert 
McMurray of Alabama. 



'VbbnclayiJMiatfy'MHMto ^(«IM^<»Mltt%<04X& ^^>»«!t7 



Mark S. Donovan, 48 

Reprographics Manager 



Katherine R. Inglis 

Retired Joslin Clinic Employee 



Rose M. Thomas 

Co-Owned Bakery Shops 



A funeral Mass for Mark 
S. Donovan, 48, of Rockland, 
formerly of Holbrook and 
Quincy, a reprographics 
manager in the printing in- 
dustry, was celebrated Mon- 
day in Saint Joseph' s Church, 
550 Washington St., Quincy. 

Mr. Donovan died unex- 
pectedly Jan. 2 at South Shore 
Hospital in Weymouth. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools and was a graduate 
of the Quincy Vocational 
Technical High School in 
1978. 

He had lived in Rockland 
for the past four years. Previ- 
ously he had lived in 
Holbrook and Quincy for 
most of his life. 

Mr. Donovan was em- 
ployed for 18 years at Air 
Graphics in Watertown. 

He was an associate mem- 
ber of the Cyril P. Morrisette 
American Legion Post #294 
in Quincy. 

He was everyone's friend 
and was loved by all who 
knew him. 

He is survived by a son, 
Daniel M. Donovan of 
Rockland; a daughter, Jes- 
sicaL. Donovan of Abington; 
a loving companion, Cheryl 
A. Brinkmann of Rockland; 
his mother, Janice M. 
(Bevilacqua) Nordstrom and 




A funeral Mass for 
Katherine R. "Kay" (Kilroy) 
Inglis of Quincy, formerly of 
Dorchester, was celebrated 
Jan. 5 in Saint Ann's Church, 
WoUaston. 

Mrs. Inglis died Jan. 1 at 
John Adams Nursing Home. 

She woriced at the Joslin 
Chnic for more than 20 years, 
retiring in 1970. 

She was an active mem- 




A funeral Mass for Rose 
M. (Nichols) Thomas of 
Quincy, co-owner of several 
bakeries and restaurants, was 
celebrated Jan. 4 in St. John 



adult life in Quincy. 

Wife of the late Louis G. 
"Louie" Thomas, she is sur- 
vived by her daughters, 
Victoria Poppe and Noreen 



the Baptist Church, 44 School Harding Kertzman both of 



KATHERINE R. INGLIS 



St., Quincy Center. 

Mrs. Thomas died Dec. 
30 at home. 

She was the former owner 
and proprietor along with her 
late husband and her family 



Quincy and Deborah Tho- 
mas Cheney of Abington; a 
sister, Ann Nichols of 
Quincy; and six grandchil- 
dren. 

She was also the sister of 



MARK S. DONOVAN 

her husband Al of 
Weymouth; four siblings, 
Patrick J. Donovan of 
Quincy, Laura J. Lambert of 
Weymouth, Tracy A. 
Landers of Quincy and 
EUwood J. Nordstrom of 
Weymouth; a grandson and 
many aunts, uncles, nieces, 
nephews, grandnephews and 
grandnieces. 

He was also the son of the 
late Sigsbee Donovan. 

Interment was in Brainttee 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay State 
Dr., Braintree, MA 02184. 



ber at St. Ann's Parish in 

Dorchester, especially with grandchildren and 10 great- Quincy Point, Vicky's Bake 
St. Ann's Band. grandchildren. Shop in North Quincy, Rain- 
She was the sister of the bow Roller Cafe in Boston, 
late John Kih-oy, Margaret Debby Donut in West 
Earley and Joseph Kikoy. Roxbury and Blazing Salads 

Burial was in Mount Restaurants. 
Wollaston Cemetery, Bom in Bangor, Maine, Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 

Quincy. she graduated from St. John Elm St., Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements Baptist High School in Memorial donations may 

were made by the Keohane Bangor. be made to Rosie's Place, 



Mrs. Inglis was a talented 
seamstress and enjoyed 
puzzles. 

She will be remembered 
as a caring, gentle woman 
whose life's focus was her 
family. 

Wife of the late Edward 
D. Inglis, she is survived by 
three daughters, Katherine J. 
Callahan of South Easton, 
formerly of Quincy; Jeanne 



of the Staff of Life Bakery in the late Mary, Helen, Eliza- 
beth, John and Elias Nichols. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 



Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the John Adams 



She had hved all of her 



889 Harrison Ave. 
MA 021 18. 



Boston, 



E. IngUs of Hudson, PL and Nursing Home, 21 1 Franklin 
Joan M. Meade of Randolph, st., Quincy, MA 02169. 
formerly of Dorchester; 7 

Anne E. Kohls 

Administrative Assistant 

A funeral service for Anne administrative assistant for 
E. (Bowser) Kohls, 84, of Sears in Boston and part-time 



Thomas G. Mulrey, 66 

Orderly At Children's Hospital 



Quincy, a retired administra- 
tive assistant, was held Jan. 3 
at the Dennis Sweeney Fu- 
neral Home, 74 Elm St., 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Kohls died Dec. 28 



for the Intemal Revenue Ser- 
vice until she was 73. 

Beloved wife of the late 
Lothar H. "Whitey" Kohls, 
she is survived by her daugh- 
ters, Barbara A. Kohls of E. 



Leonard S. Allison 

UJS. Army Veteran 

A funeral service for club. 

Leonard S. Allison of He also enjoyed fixing 

Franklin, formerly of Quincy, things around the house, 

a U.S. Army veteran, was Husband of the late Rita 

held Monday in the Keohane Y. (Charest) Allison, he is 

Funeral Home, 785 Hancock survived by two sons, Rich- 

St., Wollaston. ard S. Allison of CA and 

Mr. AlUson died suddenly Mark Allison of FL; a daugh- 

Jan. 2. ter, Janet R. Marsh of 

He was an active member Franklin; a sister, Edythe 

at Port Norfolk Yacht Club Grenier of Norton; five 



A funeral service for Tho- 
mas G. -Mulrey, 66, of 



tal before retiring. 

Bfeloved son of the late 
Quincy, a retired hospital WalterandMary(Moynihan) Quincy for almost 50 years, 
orderiy, was held Jan. 3 at the Mulrey, he is survived by his She recentiy lived with her 
Dennis Sweeney Funeral brothers, Robert Mukey of daughter in Ashbumham 
Home, 74 Ehn St., Quincy. Milton and George Muh^y 

Mr. Mulrey died Dec. 30 of Jamaica Plain; and his sis- 
at the Braintree Landing ter, Mary G. "Dolly" Colella 
Nursing and Rehabilitation. 

Bom, raised and educated 
in South Boston, he was a 



at the Heywood Hospital in Lansing, MI; Elaine J. Kohl- 
Gardner. 

Bom, raised and educated 
in Boston, she had lived in 



Ciesluk of Ashbumham and 
Donna M. Currie of 



for many years. 

He was a recent member 
of the American Legion Post 
in Wrentham. 

Mr. Allison was a friendly 



Marshfield; and four grand- man who enjoyed helping 



grandchildren and one great- 
grandchild. 

He was also the brother of 
the late Frank Allison and 
Hilda Scott. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



Mrs. Kohls worked as an 



children and three great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Dorchester. 



others, especially at the yacht Cemetery, Quincy. 



graduate of South Boston 
High School. 



of Quincy 

Burial was in Mount Cal- A funeral Mass for Ken- 
vary Cemetery. neth McDonough, Jr., of 

Memorial donations may Quincy, formeriy of South 



Kenneth McDonough, Jr. 



Funeral Home, South Bos- 



AlmQuist 

s aJi Living Beauty 



Elegant 
Arrangements 



EL O W E R L A 
OAROCN c&n^. FioMST • oirr$ 



326 FRANKLIN STREET, QUINCY ♦ 617-479-2020 



be made to the Franciscan 



He had lived in Quincy Monastery ofSt. Clare, "Poor 

for several years. Clares," 920 Centre St., Ja- 

Mr. Mulrey worked as an maica Plain, MA 02 1 30. 
orderly at Children's Hospi- 

James M. Blanchard, 65 

Carpenter 



Memorial services for 
James M. Blanchard, 65, of 
Quincy, a carpenter, were 
conducted Tuesday at the 



resident. 

Mr. Blanchard was a car- 
penter in the construction 
industry. He was also a Viet- 



Sweeney Brothers Home for nam era U.S. Navy veteran. 



Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 

Mr. Blanchard died Dec. 
3 1 at the Hebrew Rehabihta- 
tion Center in Boston after a 
long illness. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools. 

He was a lifelong Quincy 



He is survived by three 
children, two grandchildren 
and was the brother of Vina 
Egan, Beverly MacLean both 
of Quincy and Nancy Higgins 
of Halifax. 

Interment was private. 



Boston, was celebrated Jan. 
4 in St. Monica's Church, 
South Boston. 

Mr. McDonough died 
Dec. 28. 

Beloved son of the late 
Kenneth McDonough, Sr. 
and Patricia (DelTufo) 
McDonough of Quincy, he 
was the loving father of Jes- 
sica, Kenneth and Patrick 
McDonough, all of South 
Boston; and the loving 
brother of Deborah Almeida 
of Boston and Thomas 
McDonough of Quincy. 

He is also survived by a 
dear friend, Thomas White 
of South Boston; two grand- 
children and many nieces, 
nephews and cousins. 

Interment was in Pine Hill 




Memorial donations may Cemetery, Quincy. 
be made to a charity of hoice. Funeral arrangements 

were made by The O'Brien 

Mary T. Cossart, 79 

Homemaker 



Funeral services were held 
in Florida for Mary Theresa 
Cossart, 79, of The Villages, 
Florida, formerly of Quincy, 
a homemaker, who died Jan. 
3. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
Mrs. Cossart was a 1948 



High School. 

She was a member of St. 
Vincent dePaul Catholic 
Church in Wildwood, Fla. 

She is survived by her 
husband of 47 years, John 
W. Cossart of The Villages, 



Donna Kelley of 
Dainelsville, GA; and Amy 
Collins of Atlanta, GA; a son, 
John Cossart, Jr. of The Vil- 
lages, FL; a sister, Margaret 
O'Coimell of Quincy and two 
grandsons. 

Funeral arrangements 



FL; three daughters, Lee 
graduate of North Quincy Heaney of Marrietta. GA; ^^^ ™*^ ^y *® Beyers 

Funeral Home, Florida. 



Grandpa loved 
gardening, baseball, 
and playing the 

* 

harmonica. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's gathering some of 
the flowers he so tenderly 
cultivated or finding 
a musician to play 
"Take Me Out to 
the Ball Game" on the 
harmonica, you can count on us to help 
you plan a service that will be just as 
unique as the person you love. 



^okano fmeraf iServico 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 






Member by Invitation 



National Selected Morticians 



i-^ 



ftim^ 



^XNimltyHiwMnr AK 2<M 



ClBITUAI^IES 



Francis L. Phelan, Jr., 73 

Retired U. S. Postal Service Worker 



Bridget Mannix 

Homemaker 



A funeral Mass for Francis 
L."Frank'Phelan,Jr.,73.of 
Quincy. formerly of Hull, a 
retired U.S. Postal Service 
employee, was celebrated 
Jan. 2 in Saint John the Bap- 
tist Church, Quincy. 

Mr. Phelan died Dec. 27 
at home. 

Bom in Cambridge, he 
lived in Hull for many years 
before moving to Quincy in 
1993. 

A U.S. Army veteran of 
the Korean War, he worked 
for the U.S. Postal Service in 
Cambridge and Weymouth 
before retiring in 1993. 

He was a member of the 
VFW Post in Hull. 

Beloved husband of the 
late Rosemarie "Rose" 
( I'it/gerald ) Phelan, he is sur- 
vived by his children, John 
()' Bricn of Quincy. Veronica 
()' Brien otCaiirornia, Karen 



Roche of Quincy, Loretta 
Tower of Hull, Francis L. 
Phelan III of Weymouth, 
Patricia M. St. Martin of 
Abington, Wendy Bozza of 
Norfolk and Lisa Shaw of 
Oswego, N.Y.; 12grandchil- 
dren and one great-grandchil- 
dren. 

He is also survived by his 
brother, Richard Phelan and 
three sisters, Phyllis Phelan, 
Ann O'Heam and Loretta 
Bailey. 

Burial with military hon- 
ors was in National Cem- 
etery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Him St., Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Salvation 
Army, 6 Baxter St., Quincy. 
MA 02 1 69. 



Paul J. Fucile 



Former Owner 

A fiincral Mass for FaulJ. 
"I uie'lucilcofMarinaBay. 
lormerly of Milton and South 
Boston, a former gift shop 
owner, was celebrated Mon- 
day in Gate of Heaven 
Church. 

Mr. Fucile died Jan. 2. 

He was the former owner 
of Village Gift Shop, Marina 
Bay. 

He was also a retired em- 
ployee of the Gillette Corp. 

A member of the "L" 
Street Running Club, he suc- 
cessfully completed The Bos- 
ton Marathon 10 consecu- 
tive years. 

Mr. Fucile was also a 
board member of the Ron 
Burton Training Village. 

Beloved husband of 



Village Gift Shop 

Catherine Holley Fucile, he 
was the loving son of the late 
Peter and Henrietta (Corradi) 
Fucile. 

He was the loving father 
of Paul Dalton and her hus- 
band Francis of Quincy, An- 
thony Fucile and his wife, 
Amanda of Dorchester and 
Nicholas Fucile of South 
Boston. 

He was the loving brother 
of Ronald Fucile and his wife 
Beverly of Walpole. 

He is also survived by 
three grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to The Ron Burton 
Training Village, P.O. Box 
2. Hubbardsten, MA 01452. 



A funeral Mass for 
Bridget "Birdie" (Cronin) 
Mannix of Quincy, a home- 
maker, was celebrated Jan. 2 
in Sacred Heart Church, 
North Quincy. 

Mrs. Mannix died Dec. 
29. 

She was an active mem- 
ber of the Sacred Heart La- 
dies Sodality. 

Wife of the late John F. 
Mannix, she was the daugh- 
ter of the late Phi lip and Lena 
(Casey) Cronin, native of 
Millstreet, County Cork, Ire- 
land. 

She is survived by her 
children, Paul Mannix, M. 
Patricia Gavin and Sheila and 
her husband Thomas Bell all 
of Quincy, Philip Mannix and 
his wife Joellen of 
Marshfield, Eileen and her 
husband Richard O' Brian of 
Weymouth and Noreen and 
her husband Martin Millane 
of Belmont; three sisters. 
Sheila O'Callaghan, Marga- 
ret Linehan and Theresa 




BRIDGET MANNIX 

Sheehan, all of Ireland; 12 
grandchildren and 2 great- 
grandchildren. 

She was also the sister of 
the late Jeremiah, Nora, 
Daniel, Mary, Gobnait 
Cronin and Helen Walsh. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 Hancock 
St., North Quincy. 



Roberta Ruth Halsey, 71 

Retired Bank Clerk 



4 Tkoi/etfT 



^^yrA A wit once remarked that the num- 

^^flj^j^^^ ber of times the average man says no 

^^^B^^^^H to temptatira is once weakly! ... It 

^^Hh^^^^I has also been saki that the difference 

mmHlflllH between those whom the worid es- 

SCOTT DEW ARE teems as good, and those whom it 
condenms as bad, is in many cases 
little else than that the former have been better sheltered 
from temptation. . . 

Everyone of us at sometime in our lives go through the 
experience of temptation. Temptation is a trial. Have you 
ever noticed that a lot of times temptation seems to be 
directed at those points in our lives where we seem least able 
to withstand. "Lead us not into temptation'* is simply the 
petition that God will keep us free from the trial of tempta- 
tion. God never tempts anyone. We tempt ourselves. 

A life without temptation and trial would appear to be an 
ideal existence. But is this true? We don't thhik so. .. We all 
need to stand before the hard situations of life if we are gmng 
to get out of life the blessings it promises. 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
WolIastoD Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation S«^ice Available 

A Sen ice Family Affiliate ofAFFS and Servihe Corp. Int. 
492 Rock Street • FaU River. MA 02720 » (508) 676-2454 




vJ-/ C^fe^r,,// 



A funeral Mass for 
Roberta Ruth Halsey, 71, of 
Houghs Neck, a retired bank 
clerk, was celebrated Jan. 2 
at the Holy Trinity Parish - 
Blessed Sacrament Church, 
1000 Sea St., Houghs Neck. 

Ms. Halsey died Dec. 28 
at home. 

Bom at Newburg, N.Y., 
she had lived in Maiden be- 
fore moving to Quincy 40 
years ago. 

She was a retired clerk for 
the State Street Bank and had 
been a claims processor. 

She was a communicant 
of Holy Trinity Parish at 
Blessed Sacrament Church. 

She was a supporter of 
animal causes including the 
Humane Society and the So- 



ciety for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals. 

She was a lover of cats. 

She is survived by a 
daughter, Maribeth Knox of 
Scituate; a brother. Sterling 
E. Halsey of Bowdoinham, 
ME; a sister-in-law, Beverly 
Halsey of Kansas; two grand- 
children and two great-grand- 
children; and five nieces and 
nephews and several grand- 
nieces and grandnephews. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Mortimer 
N. Peck-Russell Peck Fu- 
neral Home, Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Quincy Ani- 
mal Shelter, 56 Broad St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 




Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



Joanne M. Johnson, 75 

Homemaker 



A funeral Mass for Joanne 
M. Johnson, 75, of Quincy, a 
homemaker, was celebrated 
Dec. 31 in Saint Ann's 
Church, 757 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Johnson died Dec. 
28 at home after a long ill- 
ness. 

Bom in Newton, she was 
raised in Cambridge and at- 
tended Cambridge schools. 
She was a graduate of Cam- 
bridge Rindge and Latin High 
School and the Catherine 
Gibbs Secretarial School. 

She had hved in Quincy 
for 50 years. 

Mrs. Johnson was a vol- 
unteer at Milton Hospital for 
many years. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Micheal Johnson of 
Quincy; four children, Brian 
P. Johnson, Kevin G. 
Johnson, Barry M. Johnson 
and Karen M. Conneely, all 
of Quincy; and three grand- 




JOANNE M. JOHNSON 

children. 

Interment was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Saint Ann's 
Church, c/o 757 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02170. 



Sharon E. Sager 

Administrative Manager 



Funeral services for 
Sharon E. Sager of Quincy, 
an administrative manager, 
were held Jan. 4 in the Good 
Shepherd Lutheran Church, 
308 West Squantum St., 
North Quincy. 

Miss Sager died Dec. 30 
at Tufts-New England Medi- 
cal Center after a long illness 
with lung cancer, sclero- 
derma, and pulmonary arte- 
rial hypertension. 

Bom in Baltimore, MD, 
she had lived in Quincy for 
many years. 

She was a graduate of 
North Quincy High School 
and Lesley College. 

She was an administra- 
tive manager of Urology and 
ENT at N.E. Medical Center 
and Dept. of Conununity 
Health and Family Medicine 
at Tufts Medical School for 
16 years. 

Miss Sager was an avid 
golfer and a member of 
Wollaston Golf Club. She 
also enjoyed water skiing and 

Robert 



snow skiing. 

Beloved daughter of 
Audrey (Rust) Sager of 
Quincy and the late Harold 
Sager, she is survived by a 
brother, Stephen B. Sager and 
his wife, Lynne of Kiawah 
Island, S.C. 

She was also the aunt of 
Kurt Sager and his wife, Dana 
of Stoughton, Stephen B. 
Sager, Jr. of Johns Island, 
S.C, Lt. Conunander Eric 
Sager, U.S. Navy, and his 
wife, Moira of Femandina 
Beach, Fla. and Melissa 
Sager of MA. 

She is also survived by 
several great-nieces and 
great-nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Cartwright- 
Venuti Funeral Home, 
Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Good Shepherd 
Lutheran Church, 308 West 
Squantum St., Quincy, MA 
02171. 

M. Luisi 



Retired Boilermaker 

Private funeral services Bom and raised in Quincy, 

were held for Robert M. he graduated from Quincy 
Luisi, 70, of Bullhead City, High School in 1 954. 



Ariz., formerly of Quincy and 
California, who died recently 
at home. 



Funerals • Cremations • Prearrangements 




DENNIS SWEENEY FUNERAL HOME 

Quincy *s First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney 

Funeral Director 

74 Elm Street, Quincy Massachusetts 02169 • 617-773-2728 
www.deimissweeneyfuneralhome.com 



Mr. Luisi was a U.S. Navy 
veteran. 

He moved away 40 years 
ago and worked as a boiler- 
maker before retiring in 2000, 

Son of the late Frank and 
Florence (Deveau) Luisi, he 
is survived by his loving 
daughters, Denise Taylor of 
Bullhead City, Ariz., Donna 
McMurray of Jasper, Ala. and 
Debbie Haston of Citrus 
Heights, Calif.; a brother, 
Frank Luisi and his wife 
Kathy of Pembroke; three 
grandchildren and many 
nieces, nephews and cous- 
ins. 

He was also the grandfa- 
ther of the late James Robert 
McMurray of Alabama. 



tiiunilMyt5mnBty'¥KMbS '^WtStm^Q^dm^a^Hx ^f^!t7 



Mark S. Donovan, 48 

Reprographics Manager 



A funeral Mass for Mark 
S. Donovan, 48, of Rockland, 
formerly of Holbrook and 
Quincy, a reprographics 
manager in the printing in- 
dustry, was celebrated Mon- 
day in Saint Joseph' s Church, 
550 Washington St., Quincy. 

Mr. Donovan died unex- 
pectedly Jan. 2 at South Shore 
Hospital in Weymouth. 

Bom and raised in Quincy , 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools and was a graduate 
of the Quincy Vocational 
Technical High School in 
1978. 

He had lived in Rockland 
for the past four years. Previ- 
ously he had lived in 
Holbrook and Quincy for 
most of his life. 

Mr. Donovan was em- 
ployed for 18 years at Air 
Graphics in Watertown. 

He was an associate mem- 
ber of the Cyril P. Morrisette 
American Legion Post #294 
in Quincy. 

He was everyone's friend 
and was loved by all who 
knew him. 

He is survived by a son, 
Daniel M. Donovan of 
Rockland; a daughter, Jes- 
sicaL. Donovan of Abington; 
a loving companion, Cheryl 
A. Brinkmann of Rockland; 
his mother, Janice M. 
(Be vilacqua) Nordstrom and 




MARK S. DONOVAN 

her husband Al of 



Katherine R. Inglis 

Retired Joslin Clinic Employee 

A funeral Mass for 
Katherine R. "Kay" (Kilroy) 
Inglis of Quincy, formerly of 
Dorchester, was celebrated 
Jan. 5 in Saint Ann' s Church, 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Inglis died Jan. 1 at 
John Adams Nursing Home. 

She worked at the Joslin 
Clinic for more than 20 years, 
retiring in 1970. 

She was an active mem- 
ber at St. Ann's Parish in KATHERINE R. INGLIS 

Dorchester, especially with grandchildren and 10 great- 
St. Ann's Band. grandchildren. 

Mrs. Inghs was a talented she was the sister of the 



Rose M. Thomas 

Co-Owned Bakery Shops 




A funeral Mass for Rose 
M. (Nichols) Thomas of 
Quincy, co-owner of several 
bakeries and restaurants, was 
celebrated Jan. 4 in St. John 



aduh life in Quincy. 

Wife of the late Louis G. 
"Louie" Thomas, she is sur- 
vived by her daughters, 
Victoria Poppe and Noreen 



the Baptist Church, 44 School Harding Kertzman both of 



St., Quincy Center. 

Mrs. Thomas died Dec. 
30 at home. 

She was the former owner 
and proprietor along with her 
late husband and her family 



Quincy and Deborah Tho- 
mas Cheney of Abington; a 
sister, Ann Nichols of 
Quincy; and six grandchil- 
dren. 

She was also the sister of 



of the Staff of Life Bakery in the late Mary, Helen, Eliza- 

Quincy Point, Vicky's Bake beth, John and Elias Nichols. 

Shop in North Quincy, Rain- Interment was in Mount 

bow Roller Cafe in Boston, Wollaston Cemetery, 



Weymouth; four siblings, seamstress and enjoyed late John Kikoy, Margaret Debby Donut in West Quincy 



Patrick J. Donovan of 
Quincy, Laura J. Lambert of 
Weymouth, Tracy A. 
Landers of Quincy and 
Ell wood J. Nordstrom of 
Weymouth; a grandson and 
many aunts, uncles, nieces, 
nephews, grandnephews and 
grandnieces. 

He was also the son of the 
late Sigsbee Donovan. 

Interment was in Braintree 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay State 
Dr., Braintree, MA 02184. 



puzzles. 

She will be remembered 
as a caring, gentle woman 
whose life's focus was her 
family. 

Wife of the late Edward 
D. Inghs, she is survived by 
three daughters, Katherine J. 
Callahan of South Easton, 
formerly of Quincy; Jeanne 



Earley and Joseph Kihoy. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 



were made by the Keohane Bangor. 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the John Adams 



Roxbury and Blazing Salads Funeral arrangements 

Restaurants. were made by the Dennis 

Bom in Bangor, Maine, Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 

she graduated from St. John Elm St., Quincy. 

Baptist High School in Memorial donations may 



She had lived all of her 



be made to Rosie's Place, 
889 Harrison Ave., Boston, 
MA 021 18. 



E. Inglis of Hudson, FL and Nursing Home, 21 1 Franklin 
Joan M. Meade of Randolph, st., Quincy, MA 02 1 69. 
formerly of Dorchester; 7 

Anne E. Kohls 

Administratiye Assistant 



Thomas G. Mulrey, 66 

Orderly At Children's Hospital 



A funeral service for Anne 
E. (Bowser) Kohls, 84, of 
Quincy, a retired administra- 
tive assistant, was held Jan. 3 
at the Dennis Sweeney Fu- 
neral Home, 74 Elm St., 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Kohls died Dec. 28 



administrative assistant for 
Sears in Boston and part-time 
for the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice until she was 73. 

Beloved wife of the late 
Lothar H. "Whitey" Kohls, 
she is survived by her daugh- 
ters, Barbara A. Kohls of E. 



Leonard S. Allison 

U.S. Army Veteran 

A funeral service for club. 

Leonard S. Allison of He also enjoyed fixing 

Franklin, formerly of Quincy , things around the house, 

a U.S. Army veteran, was Husband of the late Rita 

held Monday in the Keohane Y. (Charest) AlUson, he is 

Funeral Home, 785 Hancock survived by two sons, Rich- 

St., Wollaston. ard S. AlUson of CA and 

Mr. Alhson died suddenly Mark AlUson of FL; a daugh- 

Jan. 2. ter, Janet R. Marsh of 

He was an active member Franklin; a sister, Edythe 

at Port NorfoUc Yacht Club Grenier of Norton; five 



tal before retiring. 

Bbloved son of the late 



A funeral service for Tho- 
mas G. Mulrey, 66, of 

Quincy, a retired hospital Walter and Mary (Moynihan) 

orderiy , was held Jan. 3 at the MuUey , he is survived by his 

Dennis Sweeney Funeral brothers, Robert MuU-ey of 

Home, 74 EUn St., Quincy. Milton and George Mulrey 

Mr. Mulrey died Dec. 30 of Jamaica Plain; and his sis- 

at the Braintree Landing ter, Mary G. "Dolly" Colella 

Nursing and RehabiUtation. of Quincy. 

Bom, raised and educated Burial was in Mount Cal- 

in South Boston, he was a vary Cemetery. 

Memorial donations may 



at the Heywood Hospital in Lansing, MI; Elaine J. Kohl- 
Gardner. Ciesluk of Ashbumham and 

Bom, raised and educated Donna M. Currie of 
in Boston, she had hved in Marshfield; and four grand- 
Quincy for aUnost 50 years, children and three great- 
She recently Uved with her grandchildren, 
daughter in Ashbumham. Burial was in Cedar Grove 

Mrs. Kohls worked as an Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Kenneth McDonough, Jr. 



for many years. 

He was a recent member 
of the American Legion Post 
in Wrentham. 

Mr. Allison was a friendly 
man who enjoyed helping 



grandchildren and one great- 
grandchild. 

He was also the brother of 
the late Frank Allison and 
Hilda Scott. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



others, especially at the yacht Cemetery, Quincy. 



graduate of South Boston 
High School. 



be made to the Franciscan 



He had Uved in Quincy Monastery ofSt. Clare, "Poor 

for several years. Clares," 920 Centre St., Ja- 

Mr. Mulrey worked as an maica Plain, MA 02 1 30. 
orderly at Children's Hospi- 

James M . Blanchard, 65 

Carpenter 

Memorial services for resident. 
James M. Blanchard, 65, of Mr. Blanchard was a car- 

Quincy, a carpenter, were penter in the construction 

conducted Tuesday at the industry. He was also a Viet- 

Sweeney Brothers Home for nam era U.S. Navy veteran. 



Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 

Mr. Blanchard died Dec. 
3 1 at the Hebrew RehabiUta- 
tion Center in Boston after a 
long illness. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools. 

He was a lifelong Quincy 



He is survived by three 
children, two grandchildren 
and was the brother of Vina 
Egan, Beverly MacLean both 
of Quincy and Nancy Higgins 
of HaUfax. 

Interment was private. 



A funeral Mass for Ken- 
neth McDonough, Jr., of 
Quincy, formerly of South 
Boston, was celebrated Jan. 
4 in St. Monica's Church, 
South Boston. 

Mr. McDonough died 
Dec. 28. 

Beloved son of the late 
Kenneth McDonough, Sr. 
and Patricia (DelTufo) 
McDonough of Quincy, he 
was the loving father of Jes- 
sica, Kenneth and Patrick 
McDonough, all of South 
Boston; and the loving 
brother of Deborah Almeida 
of Boston and Thomas 
McDonough of Quincy. 

He is also survived by a 
dear friend, Thomas White 
of South Boston; two grand- 
children and many nieces, 
nephews and cousins. 

Interment was in Pine Hill 



Funeral Home, South Bos- 



/\LMV y lUIST 

EL O W E R LAND! 
OAnoeNC&<TER,R.onaT«orr$ ■■■ 



Elegant 
Arrangements 

Living Beauty 



326 FRANKLIN STREET, QUINCY ♦ 617-479-2020 



1 




Memorial donations may Cemetery, Quincy. 
be made to a charity of hoice. Funeral arrangements 

were made by The O'Brien 

Mary T. Cossart, 79 

Homemaker 



Funeral services were held 
in Florida for Mary Theresa 
Cossart, 79, of The Villages, 
Florida, formerly of Quincy, 
• a homemaker, who died Jan. 
3. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
Mrs. Cossart was a 1948 



High School. 

She was a member of St. 
Vincent dePaul Catholic 
Church in Wildwood, Fla. 

She is survived by her 
husband of 47 years, John 
W. Cossart of The Villages, 



Donna Kelley of 
Dainelsville, GA; and Amy 
ColUns of Atlanta, GA; a son, 
John Cossart, Jr. of The Vil- 
lages, FL; a sister, Margaret 
O'ConnellofQuincyandtwo 
grandsons. 

Funeral arrangements 



FL; three daughters, Lee 

graduate of North Quincy Heaney of Marrietta, GA; "^^^ "*^*^ ^y ^^ ^^V^^^ 

Funeral Home, Florida. 



Grandpa loved 
gardening, baseball, 
and playing the 
harmonica. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's gathering some of 
the flowers he so tenderly 
cultivated or finding 
a musician to play 
"Take Me Out to 
the Ball Game" on the 
harmonica, you can count on us to help 
you plan a service that will be just as 
unique as the person you love. 



^onano ^meraf iServico 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 






Member by Invitation 



National Selected Morticians 



i,- 



>i /!4«'4>ag»4^ 



10,20M 



CCITDAI^IES 



Rose M. Pearson, 90 

Retired Assembler 



Margaret M. Butler, 92 

Community Activist 



Marilyn M. Murray Waywood 

Retired QHS Secretary 



A funeral Mass for Rose 
M. (Marchesiani) Pearson, 
90, of Quincy, formerly of 
Weymouth, a retired assem- 
bler, was celebrated Tues- 
day in Saint John the Baptist 
Church, 44 School St., 
Quincy Center. 

Mrs. Pearson died Jan. 4 
at the John Adams Healthcare 
Center in Quincy after a brief 
illness. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
she was educated in Quincy 
schools. 

She had lived in 
Weymouth for 50 years be- 
fore moving to Quincy three 
years ago. 

Mrs. Pearson was an as- 
sembler for the former S.H. 
Couch Company in Quincy 
for 25 years. She retired in 
1979. 

She was a member of the 
Whipple Senior Center in 
Weymouth. 

Beloved wite of the late 
Arthur J. Pearson, she is sur- 
vived by her son, James 
Davidson and his wife, MiU7, 
of Weymouth; a sister, Ann 
Grant of Jacksonville, FL; 

LEGAL NOTICE 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Departntent 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3073EP 
In the Estate of 
LOUISE F. BARANOWSKI 
A/K/A LOUISE FRANCES 
BARANOWSKI 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
September 16, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition ha$ been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
WALTER R BARANOWSKI, 
JR. of LAKEVILLE in the 
County of PLYMOUTH or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed executor, 
named In the will to serve 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
FEBRUARY 6. 20M 

In addition, you mssX file a 
written affidavit (^ objections 
to the petition, stathg specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or mich other 
time as the court, on motion 
wNh notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS. HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
Rrst Justice ol said Court at 
CANTON this diyi Dwxmber 
26. 2007. 

1/1(^06 




ROSE M. PEARSON 

and two grandchildren, two 
great-grandchildren, two 
great-great-grandchildren 
and several nieces. 

She was also the sister of 
the late John Marchesiani. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to John Adams 
Healthcare Center Activities 
Fund, 211 Franklin St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

LEGAL Nonce 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 04P2777EP 

In the Estate of 
JOHN M. MAY A/K/A 
JOHN MICHAEL MAY 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
November 18, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
RICHARD J. SCANLON of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

FEBBUABYff,20W 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objectioris 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
wfiich the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
tf)e retum day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
wNh nodoe to the petilioner. 
may allow) in accordance 
wi»i Probirte Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KDPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
Fhst Jualioe of said Court at 
CANTON tt)to dii; D«)«nber 
27.2007; 

MTIHCK W. MeOBMIOTr 
Wli^Ulloll 



A funeral Mass for Mar- 
garet M. "Peg" (Daly) But- 
ler, 92, of Quincy, a commu- 
nity activist and a member of 
the Merryshores Senior Citi- 
zens, was celebrated 
Wednesday at Our Lady of 
Good Counsel Church, 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Butler died Jan. 4 at 
Quincy Medical Center after 
a brief illness. 

Bom in Mitchelltown, 
County Cork, Ireland, she 
lived in Quincy all of her hfe. 
She was a graduate of St. 
John's School and Quincy 
High School Class of 1934. 

She loved politics and 
current events and was a quiet 
activist, making her family 
kitchen table a gathering 
place for many meetings, 
lively discussions and plan- 
ning sessions. 

She was also a Red Sox 
fan. 

The beloved wife of the 
late Lawrence S. Butler, she 
was the beloved mother of 
Kathleen E. Butler, Mary 
Ann T. Lencki and her hus- 
band Joseph, and Margaret 
"Margy" Hanna and her hus- 
band Robert, all of Quincy; 

LEOAL NOTICE 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The TVIal Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3112EP 

In the Estate of 
OLIVE F GARVEY 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
September 30, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
CARLETON W. GARVEY of 
WHITMAN in the County of 
PLYMOUTH or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve wittiout surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
FEBRUARY 13. 2008 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days afler 
the return day (or such other 
time as tfie court, on motion 
wHh notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS. HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
Flnrt Juslioa of said Court at 
CANTON this di^ Deoembar 
31. 2007. 



1/1(^06 




MARGARET M. BUTLER 

Judith "Judy" P. Kolson and 
her husband Peter of Hull, 
and the late Lawrence S. 
Butler, Jr. 

She is also survived by 10 
grandchildren, 7 great-grand- 
children and her brother, 
Maurice J. Daly. 

She was the grandmother 
of the late Kerriann Kolson. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Boston Catholic 
Television, P.O. Box 9109, 
Newton ville, MA 02160 or 
the Lawrence S. Butler, Jr. 
Memorial Scholarship, 37 
Riverside Ave., Quincy, MA 
02169. 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTMENT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 00P1899GI 
GENERAL PETITION 
To ELEANOR VAN AKEN 
of QUINCY in the county of 
Norfolk, and to all persons in- 
terested in the estate of 
ELEANOR VAN AKEN, a 
person under GUARDIAN- 
SHIR 

A petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court by 
JAMES A. MCLAUGHLIN for 
authorization to REDUCE 
THE PENAL SUM OF HIS 
SAID BOND AND THAT THE 
GUARDIAN BE ALLOWED 
TO FILE A BOND WITHOUT 
SURETY for reasons more 
fully set out in said petition. 
If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written appear- 
ance In said Court at Canton 
before ten o'ckick in the fore- 
noon on the 30TH DAY OF 
JANUARY 2008. the retum 
day of this citation. 

Witness. DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN. Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this 
21 ST day of DECEMBER. 
2007. 

MmCK W. McDERMOTT 



1/1Q/08 



A funeral Mass for 
Marilyn M. Murray 
Waywood, 77, of Quincy, a 
retired secretary at (^incy 
High School, was celebrated 
Wednesday in Holy Trinity 
Parish in Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Church, 

Merrymount. 

Mrs. Murray Waywood 
died Jan. 5. 

She was the secretary to 
the principal of Quincy High 
School for 30 years. She con- 
sidered the QHS teachers and 
staff her second family and 
maintained close friendships 
with many of them. 

An avid reader, she shared 
her loved of books with 
friends and family. 

She was a graduate of St. 
Gregory's High School in 
Dorchester and held a degree 
from Quincy College. 

Mrs. Murray Waywood 
had lived in Adams Shore for 
50 years. 

She enjoyed cooking, 
shopping and travelling. 

She also loved world cul- 
tures, pohtics and college 
football. 

She was an active parish- 
ioner of Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Church and was a 
lector for many years. 

She was the beloved 
mother of Michael Murray 
and his wife Lucia of Quincy, 
Judith Murray Regan and her 
husband Richard of 
Shrewsbury, Mark Murray 
and his wife Cindy of 
Hudson, N.H., Shawn 
Murray and his wife Lynne 
of Alpharetta, GA, Marianne 
Murray Marinelli and her 
husband Jim of Braintree, 
Patti Murray DiBona and her 




MARILYN M. 
MURRAY WAYWOOD 

husband Dario of Braintree, 
Susan Murray Cronin and her 
husband Larry of Amesbury, 
Chris Murray and his wife 
Beth of Abington and Valerie 
Murray of Quincy. 

She was the sister of 
Francis Kirwin of Braintree 
and sister-in-law of Eleanor 
D'Arrigo of Weymouth, 
Kathleen McDonough of FL 
and Elizabeth Baumann of 
Duxbury. 

She is also survived by 23 
grandchildren and many 
nieces, nephews and cous- 
ins. 

She was the beloved wife 
of the late Gerald T. Murray 
and the late Robert 
Waywood. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Marilyn 
Murray Waywood Scholar- 
ship, Quincy High School, 
52 Coddington St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Thomas G. Peterson, 59 

Shaw's Supermarkets Employee 



QUINCY SUN 

HDMSCMnmS 

WANTED 

Hera's a charwa to aam 
SKtni monay by buicfing a 
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A funeral Mass for Tho- 
mas G. Peterson, 59, of 
Quincy, an employee for 
Shaw's Supermarkets, was 
celebrated Dec. 31 in Sacred 
Heart Church, Weymouth. 

Mr. Peterson died Dec. 26 
at home. 

Born and raised in 
Braintree, he had lived in 
Quincy for 37 years. 

He woiiced at Shaw's Su- 
permaiicets in both Quincy 
and Weymouth for many 
years. 

He had also worked at the 
former Fore River Shipyard 
in Quincy as a straightener. 

Mr. Peterson was an Army 
veteran serving in Vietnam, 

SWAP Earns 

Tax Abatements 

For Seniors 

The Council on Aging has 
a SWAP (Senior Workers' 
Abatement Program) that 
oaJbAe fbe elderiy to work 89 
1/2 hours a year and earn 
$600 to wards their real estate 
taxlnlk. 

Far furrier details, call 
Dorothy Dow at 617-376- 
1508. 



and was in the Mass. Army 
National Guard for many 
years. 

He was a member of 
Helen's Restaurant Bowling 
League. 

He was the beloved hus- 
band of Donna M. (Amet) 
and devoted father of Tho- 
mas M. Peterson of Quincy. 

He is also survived by two 
sisters, Joan M. Hall and 
Lillian T. Peterson, both of 
Braintree; a brother, Charles 
A. Peterson of Braintree; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

He was the brother of the 
late Margaret Kwiatloski. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Clancy- 
Lucid Funeral Home, 
Weymouth. 

COA Seeking 
Wheelchairs 

The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need of wooden ot 
metal wiieekhairs of all sizes 
and canes to l^Ip disabled 
seoiofs to get arcxmd. 

If you have one, call the 
council at 617-376-1506. 



Phte29 



Mary L. Boback, 86 

Retired Federal Reserve Bank Employee 




A funeral Mass for Mary 
L. (Butler) Boback, 86, of 
Quincy, a retired Federal 
Reserve Bank employee, was 
celebrated Wednesday in 
Saint Francis of Assisi 
Church, Braintree. 

Mrs. Boback died Jan. 4 
at South Shore Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

Bom in South Boston, she 
was raised in Dorchester and 
educated in Dorchester 
schools. She was a graduate 
of Dorchester High School 
for Girls. 

Mrs. Boback was a fom^r 
member of Saint Peter' s Par- 
ish in Dorchester for many 
years. 

She had Uved in Quincy 
for the past year. Previously, 
she Uved in Braintree for five 
years and 1 7 years at the Lei- 
sure Woods conmiunity in 
Rockland. 

She worked for the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank in Boston 
for 13 years before retiring 
many years ago. 

She and her late husband 
had been volunteers with the 
Meals on Wheels program in 
Rockland for several years. 

Mrs. Boback was a mem- 
ber of the Rockland Council 
on Aging where she had 
served as secretary and was 
also a member of the Ply- 
mouth County Democratic 
League. 




MARY L. BOBACK 

Beloved wife of the late 
Francis T. Boback, Sr., she 
was the devoted mother of 
Linda M. Mulcahy of 
Quincy, Francis T. Boback, 
Jr. of Braintree, Paul J. 
Boback and his wife Jean of 
Braintree, Jane M. O'Brien 
and her husband Paul of 
Braintree. 

She is also survived by a 
brother, Richard Butler of 
Georgia; and nine grandchil- 
dren and several great-grand- 
children. 

Interment was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Boston CathoUc 
TV, 55 Chapel St., Box 9109, 
Newton, MA 02460-9109. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-001 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor In the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Dren Luci for a 
Variance/Finding to convert the second level of the garage for 
home, professional office in violation of Title 17 as amended 
Chapter 17.16.020 (use regulations - accessory uses), and 
17.24 (use) on the premises numbered 15-17 PHIPPS 
STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chaimian 
1/10/08, 1/17/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-002 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Patrick Cibotti for a 
Variance to subdivide the lot and construct a single family 
home on the newly created lot in violation of Title 17 as 
amended Chapter 17.20.060.C (dimensional requirements) 
on the premises numbered 329 ADAMS STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
1/10/08, 1/17/08 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-003 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor In the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Kai Lin Huang for a 
Variance to enclose first floor porch and extend an enclosed 
porch over first floor porch in vk)latk>n of Title 1 7 as amended 
Chapter 17.20.040 (dimenskMial requirements) on the pre- 
mises numbered 69 APPLETON STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
1/10/08, 1/17/08 



ComnKMivvealth of 

Massachueetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 

NORFOLK Dhdslon 

Docket No. 07D1604-DV1 

DIVORCE/SEPARATE 

SUPPORT SUMIMONS 

BY PUBUCATION 

HANG MYNU TON. 

Plaintiff(s) 

VHOANGTANTRAN. 

Defendant(s) 
To the above named 
Defendant(s): 

A Complaint has been pre- 
sented to this Court by the 
Plaintiff(s) HANG MYNU 

IQN. seeking DIVQBGE. 

An Automatic Restraining 
Order has been entered in 
this matter preventing you 
from taking any action which 
would negatively impact the 
current financial status of any 
party. Please refer to Supple- 
mental Probate Court Rule 
41 1 for more information. 

You are required to serve 
upon ATTORNEY VY H. 
TRUONG . whose address is 
985 DORCHE STER AV- 
ENUE. DORCHESTER. MA 
02125 . your answer on or 
before 3/20/08 . If you fail to 
do so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and adjudrca- 
tion of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at 

CANTON- 
WITNESS, DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at CAN- 
TON this IZ^ day, Dec em - 
ber. 2007 . 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate Court 
1/3, 1/10, 1/17/08 



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Commonwealth of 

The THal Court 
ProlMrte and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Dh^lsion 

Docl(etNo.07P3061EP 
In the Estate of 

JOHN M. NORIS, SR. 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

Date of Death 

November 27, 2007 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
JOHN M. NORIS, JR. of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
FEBRUARY 6. 2008. 

In additk>n, you must file a 
written affidavit of objectbns 
to the petitk>n, stating specifk: 
facts and grounds upon 
whrch the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, December 
24, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of ProtMte 
1/10/08 



Commonwealth of 

Massachuaetts 

The THai Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3038EP 
In the Estate of 
LILLIAN IRENE BROGAN 

Ute of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

Date of Death 

October 25, 2007 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
ANN MARIE BROGAN of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
JANUARY 30. 2008 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specifk: 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, December 
19, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/10/08 




Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

TheTMai Court 

ProlMrte and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Dhflalon 

Docket No. 07P2976EP 
In the Estate of 
ANNE E. CREEDON A/K/A 
ANNE ELIZABETH 
CREEDON 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
November 21, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the at>ove captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
DANIEL J. CREEDON of 
BRAINTREE in the County of 
NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
JANUARY 23. 2008 . 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, Decembet ■ 
11,2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/10/08 



l^igpil 



I NVrrATIONTOPID 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

1305 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY, MA 02169 

The City of Quincy, on behalf of the Quincy College, invites sealed sub and general bids for the Saville Hall Science Facilities 
at Quincy College, 24 Saville Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169, in accordance with the documents prepared by the 
Quincy College Facilities Department. 

The project consists of interior alterations to the second floor of Saville Hall to create three (3) science labs and supporting 
spaces. The work includes demolition, interior partitions, doors, science lab tables and cabinets, plumbing, fire protection, 
HVAC, electrical work, and interior finishes. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the Office of the Purcheising Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy. 
Massachusetts 02169, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. after January 9, 2008. 

Bids/Proposals must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, "BID 
ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

One set of bid documents will be available upon receipt of a refundable bid deposit of $100. Additional sets may be 
purchased for $1 00 per set, which is non-refundable. Payment shall be made payable to the City of Quincy in the form of cash, 
certified check, treasurer's or cashier's check. Personal and company checks will not be accepted. Bid documents will not be 
mailed. 

A non-mandatory site walk through is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2008 at 2:30 p.m. at the Office of the President 
of Quincy College, second floor of Saville Hall, 24 Saville Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169. 

The successful bidder will be required to confonn to the payment of Prevailing Wage Rates, as detemnined by the 
Commissioner of Labor & Industries under the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 149, Section 26 to 27D as amended. 

Forms for the CONTRACTORS QUALIFICATIONS STATEMENT are included for the Division of Asset Management. 
DCAM Certification in the category of the appropriate trade is required. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration. Bids will be received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and 
date stated above at which time and date they will be publicly opened and read. Late Bids, delivered by mail or in person, will 
be rejected. 

If applicable, bids shall be in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 30B, Chapter 149 as amended, and Chapter 30, Sections 
39A, 39B and 39F-R. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid or the one deemed best for the City and waive 
any informalities in the bidding if it is in the best interest of the City to do so. 

General bids are due In the Office of the Purchasing Agent on Thursday. January 31. 2008 at 2:00 p.m. 

Filed Sub-Bids for the trades listed below are due In the Office of the Purchasing Agent on Wednesday. January 
23. 2008 at 2:00 p.m. Plumbing, Electrical, HVAC. ^ 

William J. Phelan, MAYOR 
Laurie M. Allen, PURCHASING AGENT 
1/10/08 




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$39,900 THIS WEEK- 
END - $19,900. 10 
acres - was $39,900, 
THIS WKEND - 
$29,900. Woods, fields, 
creek, views! Just off 
the Thruway, gorgeous 
setting! Owner Terms! 
Incredible deals! Hurry! 
877-892-5263 

LAND FOR SALE 

95% Owner Financ- 
ing!!! Loon Mountain 
Area $59,900! BIG 
mountain views. Amaz- 
ing location near skiing 
and hiking! Call TODAY 
toll free 1-877-640- 
LAND (5263) - 7 days - 
northernacres.com 

MISCELLANEOUS 

SAWMILLS from only 
$2,990.00 - Convert 
your LOGS TO VALU- 
ABLE LUMBER with 



your own Non/vood por- 
table band sawmill. Log 
skidders also available 
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tion: 1-800-578-1363 
Ext. 500-A 

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CIAL! Sample our 
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trade and organic 
coffee. Visit 
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to view the complete list 



of International Coffee 
we carry. Call for more 
information 1-888-542- 
2236 

MORTGAGES 

REVERSE MORT- 
GAGES! SENIOR 
HOMEOWNERS! No 
payment until you per- 
manently leave your 
Residence. Govern- 
ment insured, no quali- 
fying. Call Frank Costa 
1-800-974-4846 x229. 
Continental Funding. 
Stoughton, MA 

w w w . c f c - 
reversemortgage.com 



REAL ESTATE 

ADIRONDACK - BASS 
LAKE 19 Acres - 
$59,900 Beautiful 
woodlands, nice views, 
great hunting / fishing 
Christmas & Associates 
800-229-7843 
www.landandcamps.com 

VACATION RENTALS 

FLORIDA, MARCO IS- 
LAND, Beachfronts 
Available Now. Vacation 
Rentals/Sales 
Beachfront condos, pri- 
vate homes. Enjoy 
shopping & beaches 
Century 21 1st South- 
ern Trust 800-61 8-8052 
WWW.C21 marco.com 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM ii 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION 
BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ]1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

( )1 YEAR OUTSir« QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



"•^ 



TMMdiy, JaMHHfjr.l«« JMI . 



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FOR RENT 



HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE F.BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 

Rentals for ail Occasions 

617-472-6234 

617-479-2254 



TF 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Call now to book your Party 

and other Special Events 

617^72-5900 

www.QuincySOI.coin tf 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

Call for Details 

617-770-4876 

Small Weddings • Showers 

Christenings • Meetings 



TT 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 

HALL FX)R RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 ^ 

TF 



FUNCTION FACILITY 
QUINCY YACHT CLUB 

1310 Sea St., Quincy 

Beautiful Bay Views 

Full Bar & Kitchen 

Handicap Equip 

617-471-6136 i/24 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves, 

machinist, and sbeetmetal tools, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections: old postcards, toys, 

military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Davistowiiniuseum.org 

e-Store & antique sale! tf 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FAMILY BIBLE 

Seeking whereabouts of Welsh 

bible for THOMAS family - possibly 

given to Masonic/Rural Lodge in 

Quincy/Wollaston in the 1930s. 

Info - please call 

412-841-7531 (Pittsburgh, PA) 

1/31 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 

in Senior Center to assist 
with activities and senior 

lunch program. Call 

Beechwood on the Bay 

Maryann- 617-471-5712 



1/10 



VOLLEYBALL CO-ED 

Adults 40+ 
Wednesdays llam-12:30pni 

Beechwood on the Bay 
440 E. Squantum St, Quincy 

CaU (617) 471-5712 



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J( c<j.i 11x1 IL. 



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SERVICES 



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Interior & Exterior 

Power Washing & Carpentry 

All Types of House Repairs 

Reasonable Price 

Small Jobs Welcome 

Leave Message 617-773-4761 ^^ 



IMAGE 
IMPROVEMENT 

LANDSCAPIMCa 
SIMCE 1972 

We Clean It... Trim 
It... Remove It 

No Job Too Big 
or Too Small 
^^LFree Estimates 
^^B Fully Insured 

617-471-0044 



SERVICES 



PLiNO TUNING & 
REPAIR SERVICE 

Susan Burgess, 

Certified Piano Technician 
Associate Member of the 
Piano IMinidans Guild 

781-335-2227 '"o 
email: swbiirgess@verizon.net 



SERVICES 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 

Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 

617-251-6242 . 




1/10 



DeFrancesco Construction 

Specializing In: REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

ROOFING - TRIM - GUTTERS - VINYL SIDING 

CaU Today for a quick, FREE Estimate 

or No Hassle Information 

617-365-1444 

30 Year Guarantee on All Workmanship 

MA Reg. #101376 tf 




Sump Pumps 

Sales • Services 
Installations 



617-224-3725 
Fax:617-770-3462 ^ 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating, Gas Fitting 
Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 
Emei^encies 617-792-4054 

Master Lie #13749 tf 



Fully Licensed & Insured 



THOMAS C. SWEENEY 

Smaller Jobs a Specialty 

44 Years Experience 

Carpentry, Siding, Panting, Porches 

VinylAVindows, Doors, 

Roofing, Decking, Steps 

Liceiise#1373 Free Esdmates 

Reliable 617-825.1210 References 



HOME SWEET HOME 
REAL ESTATE 

Fran Lawlor • Quincy, MA 

617-328-9952 

Cell 617-314-3788 



in 



SAVK 

lUuh^et Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 

TF 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLUMBING, HEATING & AC 

Specializing in Viessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 



SERVICES 



LAWFORP PLUMBING 

& HOME REPAIRS 

Small Jobs • Faucet Repairs 

• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• E>rain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals Installed 

• Minor Carpentry 

• Tile & Grout Repairs 
• Baseboard & Radiator 

Steam Cleaning 

24 Hour Service 
Master Lie. 07306 

781-817-5434 t. 



SERVICES 




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TV & Appliance 

Sales, Service, 
Parts & Installation 

Since 1945 

(617)472-1710 

115 Franklin Street, 
Quincy, MA 

hancocktvandappliance.com 



MA Uc. #10589 3/13 



SERVICES 



HONEY B'S CLEANING 

References 

Homes • Condos 

Apartments 

Reasonable Rates 

617-223-1703 , „ 



*YARD WORK CO.* 

Lawn Mowing Service 

Every 2 weeks or 3 times a month 

Rental Properties welcome 

SPRING CLEANUPS 

Mulch Work 

Expert Hedge and Bush Trimming 

Serving Quincy for 20 Years 

Call Bill Fielding 
617-471-6124 



SWIM LESSONS 

Red Cross Certified 

All Levels Offered 

Afternoon and Weekends 

Lincoln-Hancock Pool 

Call 617-298-0025 

1/10 



PERSONAL 



THANK YOU 

St. Anthony, St. Joseph, 

St. Jude & Mary & 

Sacred Heart & St. Claire 

for favors granted. 

^ 1/10 



MISCELLANEOUS 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 

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home delivery route. 

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VINYL SIDING 

VINAL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 

617-471-6960 

Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates 

Mass. Reg. # 147733 



3/6 



BOB'S HOME REPAIR 

* Decks and Porches Built OR Repaired 

* Front OR Back Steps Repaired OR Replaced 

* Replacement Windows Installed 

* Garages Repaired 

* Vinyl Siding Installed OR Repaired 

* Wood Shingles Repaired 

* Kitchen Cabinets Installed 

* Expert Carpenter ! ! 

INSURED, MASS. UC. # CS086I29 

CALL BOB BLAKE - 617-471-6124 



MARBLE • CERAMIC 
• GRANITE • 

TILE GUY 

Specializing in Customer 
Satisfaction. Perfection Guaranteed 

Call Pauly 
1-774-273-0406 ,2, 



THE T-SHIRT 

MASTER 

Custom Silk 

Screening 

Call Rich at 

617-472-8658 



HELP WANTED 



RETAIL SALES PERSON 

Full or Part Time 



-0- 



1372 Hancock Street, Quincy 
617-471-3100 






MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 

□ Autos 
G Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
G Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 

□ Daycare 
Q Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



RATES 
IWEEK 



G 



$8.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 
100 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $7.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ $6.75 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

13 WEEKS 

OR MORE 



□ 



□ Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



$6.50 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 1 3 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 4PM- PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



W ■ "• 



32 



'Tiianday.'jiiMiiirt^MM 



* • • • * p f •>•*••>•*•*•>•«•«*••••#••• t* •*•***••*«*««•*« t* t« t« *•-« «• « -« * *• t« i« ^ «# •* »4 



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.4 



Quincy Celebrates New Year's At Family Fest 2008 




TITANIC ORCHESTRA featuring Copley Chamber Players, under the direction of Sandy 
Kieger, perform "Masic of the Titanic" in the Thomas Crane Library's Richardson Room at 
Quincy 's Family Fest 2008 celebration. The string quartet's selections included Strauss waltzes, 
operatic melodies from Carmen, tangos, foxtrots and English dance hall music. HAPPY 2008! - Cousins Zoe Forest, age 7 (left) and Adriana Leonard, 8, ring in the New Year 

inside the atrium at Presidents' Place Galleria during Quincy's FamilyFest 2008 celebration. 





ANOTHER FAVORITE OF Quincy's New Year's Eve celebration, the South Shore Men of 
( HILDRKN (;AI HER AROUND Frostma, the Wmter Lady, for stories and laughter ins.de the Harmony, perform upstairs in Bethany Church. Specializing in the barbershop style of close 
( hlldren's Rm»m of the Thomas Crane I'ubllc Library. Frostina is the ofT.cial Merrymaker of ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ j^^ S^^j^ S^^^^ j^^„ ^^ Harmony feature old standards to contemporary 
Quincy s New Year s Eve celebration. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble ^^^j^ j„ ^^^.^ Christmas holiday selections. 



The Commonwealth Restaurant 

Dinner For 2 Every Saturday 6p.m. - 9p.m. 

For Only $20.00 



3 Course Dinner Includes 

Fresh Field Green Salad 
Choice Of Entree: 

Prime Rib 

Baked Stuffed Sole 

Lobster Ravioli Pomadoro 

Grilled Pork Chops 

Chicken Cordon Bleu 

Choice of Dessert: 

Homemade Apple Crisp 

Homemade Fried Ice Cream 



www.commonwealthrestaurant.com 



Catch All The 
NFL Playoffs 

on our 

15 Flat Screen T.V.'s 

Our DJ.'s Spin 

The Best Dance Music 

Every Friday 

& Saturday Nights 

No Cover Before 9 p.m. 

Wednesday Night Trivia 



79 ParkiiiLnvav. Qiiincv 617-773-3400 




QCAP Cites Heating Costs 

As The Top Emergency 

- Page 3 • 




Tlie Quizicy 



VOL. 40 No. 18 



Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper 



Thursday, January 17, 2008 





i 



F 



Cardinal Sean O 'Malley Presides 

Dr. Carmen Mariano 
Inaugurated As First 
President Of AWHS 



Dr. Carmen M. Mariano 
of Quincy was inaugurated 
as the first president of 
Archbishop Williams High 
School during a recent cer- 
emony presided over by 
His Eminence, Sean Cardi- 
nal O'Malley. 

Inauguration services 
were held in the Catholic 
co-educational high 
school's 1000-seat audito- 
rium. In addition to a cadre 
of dignitaries and commu- 
nity leaders, Archbishop 
Williams High School 
board members, students, 
parents, teachers, and 
friends and family of Dr. 
Mariano attended the inau- 
guration. 

A reception was held on 
the school's campus fol- 
lowing the ceremony. 

Dr. Mariano officially 
began his duties as Presi- 
dent of Archbishop Will- 
iams High School on Aug. 
6, adopting the lead role in 
guiding the school's 
growth, direction and vi- 
sion. 




CARDINAL SEAN O'MALLEY and Dr. Carmen Mariano 
following his inauguration as the first president of Arch- 
bishop Williams High School. 



Prior to being named 
President of Archbishop Wil- 
liams High School, Dr. 
Mariano served as assistant 
superintendent of Schools 
and Personnel in the City of 



Quincy. His long list of 
credentials also includes 
Assistant Superintendent 
for Personnel, Business 
and Plant for Quincy pub- 

(Cont'dOnPage 11) 




DR. CAR\fEN MARIANO (tMrd from right) enjoys an hiaugural reception with his family 
and friends. With the honoree are (frmn 1^) John Fagerlund, brother-in-law; Bonnie 
Fagerlund, sister-m-law; Natahe Mariano, sister; his wife. Dee Dee Mariano, and Shelley 
Fenily, famfly friend. Michelle McGrath/PR First Photos 



Winter Costs Nearing $1 Million Mark 

Koch Gets An 

'A' In First 

Snow Storm Test 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The week-old administra- 
tion of Mayor Tom Koch got 
an A for effort in the wake of 
Monday's storm that 
dumped some five inches of 
snow on the city. 

But concems were rising 
about the seasonal price tag 
for snow removal that is ap- 
proaching $1 million with 
another, lesser snow storm 
expected this afternoon 
(Thursday) and tomorrow. 

"The downtown cleanup 
went quite well," said 
Maralin Manning, executive 
director of the Quincy Busi- 
ness Association. "Everyone 
heeded advice and stayed 
away. Quincy Center was 
spooky quiet." 

The cleanup all over the 
city went well, too, with the 



addition of 50 plow teams to 
the city's snow removal ar- 
senal keeping the main roads 
open, most neighborhood 
streets passable and com- 
plaints to a minimum. 

Christopher Walker, 
policy director in the Koch 
administration, said the city 
budget was akeady $600,000 
to $700,000 in the hole be- 
fore the latest storm began. 
Estimates of the cost of this 
week's storm started at 
$80,000. 

'This storm should push 
it up closer to a milhon," he 
said. 

The amount budgeted for 
Fiscal 2008 is $200,000 in 
the contractual budget and 
$100,000 in the personnel 
budget. The difference will 
be made up in the Fiscal 



2009 budget. 

Walker said the city expe- 
rienced no major problems 
during the storm, which be- 
gan in the early hours of 
Monday morning and pe- 
tered out in midaftemoon. 

"We were way ahead of 
it," said Tom Gorman, the 
city's emergency manage- 
ment director. "There were 
some tree limbs down. There 
were some power outages 
but power was restored 
quickly. 

"We didn't really get the 
storm they predicted. There 
was not as much snow, only 
five or six inches. There's 
another storm Friday but it 
will be mostly rain." 

Gorman said no emer- 
gency shelters had to be 

(Cont'd On Page 8) 



Eight Reappointed 

Davis Names Council 
Committee Chairmen 



City Councillor At Large 
John Keenan will retain his 
post as chair of the Council's 
powerful Finance Commit- 
tee during 2008-09 under the 
presidency of Ward 4 Coun- 
cillor Jay Davis. 

Davis announced his 
choices for chairs of the 
Council's 14 committees 
Tuesday. 

They include eight chairs 
from the 2006-07 commit- 
tees under Ward 5 Council- 
lor Doug Gutro, the former 
president. 

Ward 6 Councillor Brian 
McNamee was picked as 




JAY DAVIS 

vice chair of the Finance 
Conmiittee. 



The Fin Com, as well as 
the Ordinance and Oversight 
Committees, are committees 
of the whole, meaning that 
all nine members of the City 
Council are also conmiittee- 
men. 

Gutro was named chair of 
the Ordinance Committee 
with Ward 3 Councillor 
Kevin Coughlin as vice 
chair. 

McNamee was appointed 
chair of the Oversight Com- 
mittee with Ward 1 Council- 
lor Leo Kelly vice chair. 

(Cont'd On Page 8) 




4t7t"ettit 



■ Meeting Friday On NQHSCitK»iiigIs^-P<«e 2 ■ Quincy To Host Babe Ruth World Series 'Pagel9 



ra^2 TIM Qolafldy Slim 'Tlterida^ JteAuylT, 2008 



Clasby Returns As 
Council On Aging Director 



Thomas Clasby has re- 
turned as Director of the 
Quincy Council on Aging. 

Clasby, who resigned in 
October because of differ- 
ences with former Mayor 
William Phelan's adminis- 
tration over a planned senior 
citizen center, was reap- 
pointed by Mayor Thomas 
Koch. 

Clasby joined the Coun- 
cil on Aging in 1 997 and was 
named director in 1999. 

"Tom has for years 
worked tirelessly on behalf 
of our city's seniors, I am 
proud to bring him back 
where he belongs," Koch 
said. "He is dedicated, hard- 
working, and truly cares 
about our seniors and our city . 
I am looking forward to 
working with him on so many 
issues." 

During his tenure. KcKh 




TOM CLASBY 

noted, the transportation pro- 
gram has grown to include a 
fleet of 1 2 vehicles, provid- 
ing free medical transporta- 
tion to Quincy seniors daily. 
He has developed the elder 
service plan, which is a com- 
prehensive initiative de- 
signed to network with agen- 
cies to provide legal assis- 
tance, health screenings, tax 
programs and referrals to el- 
ders and families. Working 



closely with other depart- 
ments in the City. 

Clasby has been involved 
in the Senior Olympics, the 
Annual Senior Conference 
and the development of se- 
nior housing at Naval Ter- 
race. 

"I am extremely excited 
to return to a job in the city 
that I love," Clasby said. 
"Working with the seniors in 
this community has been a 
phenomenal experience. I 
know that Mayor Koch, who 
once served as the Council 
on Aging Director, is pas- 
sionate about senior issues. 
It will be an honor to work in 
his administration." 

Clasby is a native of 
Squantum, a graduate of 
North Quincy High School, 
Quincy College and the 
Franciscan University of 
Ohio. 



Koch, School Officials 

To Meet On NQHS 

Crossing Issue 




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flexible course design & class schedules. 
Medical Billing & Coding Certificate 
Medical Administrative Assistant Certificate 
Quick Books Certificate 






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with selected tuitions starting as low as $295. 

For more detailed information call 617-984-1662 

or for easy phone registration call 617-984-1650 

or visit our website: www.qiiincycollege.edu 

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No one could have 
stopped a car to prevent last 
week's accident in which a 
teenager was seriously 
injured near North Quincy 
High School, according to a 
witness statement provided 
to police at the scene of the 
accident. 

'The driver never had a 
chance. Even in the best of 
conditions, you couldn't stop 
in time," states the witness in 
the poUce report provided by 
Police Lt. Kevin Tobin. 

According to the poUce 
report, she said she "pulled 
her jacket over her head, ran 
across the street without 
looking." 

It was raining at the time, 
police said. She was 
transported to Boston 

Merrymounters 
To Meet Jan. 24 

The Merrymount Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual 
members meeting Thursday, 
Jan. 24, at 7:30 p.m. at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel Hall 
in Holy Trinity Parish, 227 
Sea St. Local politicians are 
invited to speak and refresh- 
ments will be served. 

For more details, contact 
Michael O'Connell at 617- 
773-0181. 



Medical Center with serious 
injuries. 

Regardless of such 
circumstances, the accident 
is one more statistic 
indicating that that section of 
Hancock Street is dangerous 
for pedestrians due to the high 
traffic volume, the proximity 
of the high school, a 
McDonald Drive-Through 
restaurant, and the T station. 

A seven-year-old was 
injured there in December 
and a 47-year-old father was 
killed at Hunt and Hancock 
Streets just over a year ago. 

"It's been an area of 
consistent concern," said 
Ward 3 Councillor Kevin 
Coughlin who drives through 
the area every morning. One 
possible idea may be an island 
as the street is wide for 
crossing. 

School Committee 
member Anne Mahoney said 
safety issues in the area will 
be discussed Friday when she 
and other school officials 
meet with Mayor Thomas 
Koch. Mahoney said that the 
NQHS Parent Teachers' 
Organization also plans to 
discuss the problem. 

Traffic was a major issue 
in the recent mayoral 



campaign. 

Mahoney said traffic 
issues on Hancock Street 
need to be studied as a whole, 
all along Hancock Street, as 
changes in one area impact 
another. Nearby is Sacred 
Heart Elementary School. 

Both Mahoney who 
headed the Committee's 
Health, Safety and Security 
Committee and Ward 6 
Councillor Brian McNamee 
outlined major traffic 
improvements recently made 
in the area after Mahoney' s 
Committee filed a report. 

McNamee noted that, 
among other improvements 
in the area near NQHS, the 
City has retimed the signals, 
provided line markings that 
delineate specific moves, 
provided rumble strips, new 
signs and signals with arrows 
for turns. The pedestrian 
crosswalk signs are 
fluorescent. 

"That's an inherently 
dangerous area," McNamee 
said of the Hancock Street 
crossing section. "It's a busy 
urban area that will never be 
made inherently safe," 
especially when "young 
children are not paying 
attention to traffic." 



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• Real Estate • Wills/Trusts 

• Divorce • Corporate 

Now Accepting all Major Credit Cards 

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Quincy 



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near Quincy Center (f) 




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Hiursday, January 17, 2008 Tll» Quinoy Sun Page 3 



Ca/Zi' On Bush To Act 



QCAP Cites 

Heating Oil Costs 

Top Emergency 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

President Bush must act 
immediately on the current 
heating fuel emergency, ac- 
cording to Beth Ann StroUo, 
Executive Director of Quincy 
Community Action Pro- 
grams, Inc. (QCAP). 

"He needs to release emer- 
gency fuel assistance right 
away," StroUo said last week, 
adding that her agency needs 
more fuel assistance urgently 
in order to help the hundreds 
of local residents in crisis. 

QCAP, a non-profit orga- 
nization with headquarters in 
Quincy, serves over 23,000 
low and moderate income 
people on the South Shore 
and Norfolk County. The 
agency is funded through 
private and pubUc grants and 
contributions. 

Last year, QCAP aided 
nearly 3000 households 
through the Fuel Assistance 
Program. This year's num- 
bers are already increasing. 

"We think most people 
have already exhausted their 
benefits," said Tracy 
Donahue, QCAP Director of 
Planning and Development. 

Strollo issued the SOS at 
a joint press conference with 
Taylor Caswell, Regional 
Director of the United States 
Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD). 

The heating fuel emer- 
gency tops QCAP's current 
hst of emergencies along with 



the housing and mortgage 
crisis, according to Strollo, 
who then accepted an over- 
sized $40,000 replica check 
from Caswell. 

The HUD grant funds are 
earmarked for financial edu- 
cation programs and family 
housing counseUng which are 
of major importance, accord- 
ing to both Caswell and 
Strollo. 

C^AP services include 
homeownership education, 
mortgage default and fore- 
closure assistance, 
homelessness prevention, 
credit and budget counsel- 
ing, down payment assis- 
tance and Home Equity Con- 
version Mortgage counsel- 
ing for seniors. 

Through the education 
programs, participants learn 
"all the ins and outs" of mort- 
gages and home ownership 
before purchasing homes, 
according to Strollo. 

QCAP's First-Time 
Home Buyers program reg- 
istered 390 households last 
year; of that number, 69 
people purchased their first 
home armed with sohd fi- 
nancial education. 

"The value of housing 



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counseling can not be over- 
stated," said Caswell. "Hous- 
ing education programs of- 
fered by Quincy Community 
Action Programs and other 
HUD-certified housing coun- 
seling agencies help families 
make informed choices. . . ." 
Mortgage Crisis 
Strollo and Caswell ad- 
dressed the current mortgage 
foreclosure crisis. Both urged 
families and individuals to 
get help early, as soon as 
they begin experiencing fi- 
nancial problems. 

"Call early," said StoUer, 
"the minute, you get five, 10 
days behind (on the mort- 
gage payment)." 

"The bad loans that people 
got into three years ago, the 
ARM (adjustable rate mort- 

(Cont'd On Page 10) 





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A $40,000 HUD GRANT award was presented to QCAP recently by Taylor Caswell, Hud's 
Regional Director (third from right). The funds are used for financial education for prospective 
homeowners. With Caswell are (left to right) Nancy Callanan, Quincy Planning Dept, Chris 
Walker, Mayor Koch's Policy Director, Kim Arouca, representing Congressman William 
Delahunt, Caswell, Beth Ann Strollo, Executive Director of QCAP, Nancy Sullivan, QCAP 
Housing Director. Quincy Sun Photo/Laura Griffin 

License Board Meeting Jan. 22 



The License Board will 
take the following action at 
the Jan. 22 meeting. 

•Hearing regarding the 
request of Chipotle Mexican 
Restaurant of Colorado, 
LLC, doing businsess as 
Chipotle Mexican Grill, 60 



Newport Ave. Bradley 
Toothman, manager, for a 
common victuraler license. 
Dan Brennan, counsel. 

•Hearing regarding the 
request of Coop's Bar & 
Grill, 520-530 Washington 
St. for an Entertainment Li- 



cense. Mario Recupero. 

•Continued hearing of 
Dec. 1 8 regarding the request 
of M & J Auto Service Inc. 
doing business as Sea Street 
Getty, 346-350 Sea St. Mufid 
Habchi, manager, for a Mo- 
tor 1 1 Used Car License. 



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USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St.. Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr., Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth, Editor 

50e per copy. $25.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy $38.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy MA 02169 

The Ouincy Sun aMum«« no financial rMponwbility tor typographical erron in 
advartisemantB but wiH repnnt that part of an advertlacmant in vvhich ttie typographical 
error occurs 



Moments 
in time 



THE HISTORY CHANNEL 



• On Jan. 14, 1875, theolo- 
gian, musician, philosopher 
and Nobel Prize-winning 
physician AJbert Schweitzer 
is bom in Upper-Alsace, Ger- 
many. Awarded the Nobel 
Peace Prize for 1952, 
Schweitzer used his $33,000 
award to start a leprosarium at 
Lambarene. 

• On Jan. 18, 1882, A.A. 

Milne, creator of >\^innie- 
the-Pooh, is bom. When 
Milne's son Christopher 
Robin was about a year old, 
he received a stuffed bear as 
a present, which inspired 
Milne to begin writing a 
series of whimsical stories. 

• On Jan. 15, 1919, fiery- 
hot molasses floods the 
streets of Boston when the 
bolts on a S8-foot-high tank 
filled with 2.5 million gallons 
of crude molasses suddenly 
explode. The molasses 
flowed into the street, 
knocked over the local firc- 
house and pushed over the 
suj^rt beams for the elevat- 
ed train line. In all, 21 people 
were killed. 

• On Jan. 19, 1940, the 

Three Stooges film "You 
Natiy Spy" is released. The 
Three Stooges made a total 
of 190 short subjects with 



Columbia, at least 20 fea- 
ture-length films, and hun- 
dreds of cartoons. 

• On Jan. 17, 1950, a team 
of 11 thieves steals more 
than $2 million from the 
Brink's Armored Car depot 
in Boston. The Great Brink's 
Robbery was the almost per- 
fect crime. Just days before 
the six-year statute of limita- 
tions was set to expire, the 
culprits were finally caught. 

• On Jan. 20, 1961, 87- 
year-old Robert Frost recites 
his poem "The Gift Out- 
right" at the inauguration of 
President John F. Kennedy. 
Although Frost had written a 
new poem for the occasion, 
titled "Dedication," faint ink 
in his typewriter made the 
words difficult to read, so he 
recited "The Gift Outright" 
from memory. 

• On Jan. 16, 1973, the 

long-running Westem series 
"Bonanza" is canceled after 
14 seasons. The show, which 
debuted in 1959, was the 
first Westem to be televised 
in color. Its trademark theme 
song rose to No. 19 on Bill- 
board's Top Singles chart in 
1961. 

O 2008 King Featuret Synd, Inc. 



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I I s: 



By Henry Bosworth 



Hillary's Tearful Moments 




HAROLD 



Her critics have made a big deal out of Hillary 
Clinton' s pre-primary emotional moments in New 
Hampshire. 

Like she's trying to cry her way to the White House 
on a sympathy vote. 

They have her as a calculating political ice lady with 
no feelings. Just wrapped in politics. No real warmth. 

You would think she had never shed a tear before. 
Well, she did once right here in Quincy. 

That was back in October 1996 during her visit as 
First Lady. 

She drew a rousing crowd of some 1 0,000 to the lawn 
of the Thomas Crane Public Library for an afternoon 
rally for her husband President Bill Clinton, Vice- 
President Al Gore and other Democrats. 

Senators Edward Kennedy and John Kerry and other 
notable Democrats were here, too. But it was Hillary's 
show. 

The late Paul Harold had a surprise for me that day. 
"You brought tears to Hillary ' s eyes," 
he said. 
What! 

Actually, he was responsible for it 
happening. Here's how. 

Hillary ' s father, Hugh Rodham, was 
my company conunander during boot 
training at the Great Lakes, 111. Naval 
Training Center during World War H. 

I was in Company 1968 in the Camp Green Bay 
section of the sprawling basic training facility. 

After three months of training through a bitter winter, 
we graduated and the Navy took photos of the entire 
company and individual ones. 

One of the photos was of Hillary's father and me, 
looking like a couple of Navy buddies. 

Anyway, a few days before Hillary was scheduled to 
appear in Quincy, I happened to mention to Harold, one 
of those in charge of the visit, that I knew her father and 
that he was my company conmiander at Great Lakes. 

I also told him that I still had a photo of us together. 

"That's interesting," he said, and asked for a copy of 
the photo, which I gave him. 

Mayor James Sheets, Harold and other city councillors 
were invited to meet the First Lady inside the library 
before she was to speak to the crowd outside. 

While Harold was chatting with her, he pulled out the 
photo of her father and me and showed it to her. 

"Wow !" she said, according to Harold, quite surprised 
to be standing in Quincy looking at a photo of her father. 
"Look at those two handsome guys." (Thanks, Hillary) 

Then it kind of hit her. Her father had died in 1993. 
And seeing the photo of him as a young Navy chief 
petty officer was an unexpected sentimental surprise 
for her. 

*Tears just welled in her eyes," Harold said. He then 
gave her the copy of the photo. 

After the end of the speaking program, Hillary wanted 
to meet me and made her way through the crowd with 
Harold's help to where I was standing. 

"Thank you so much for the photo," she said. "It was 
such a nice surprise." 

She wanted to know what kind of a company 
conmiander her father was. 

•Tough," I told her. "But only doing his job.'* 

AiKi, he was tough. No horsing around. It was: 
"You're in the Navy now. You're going off to war-not 

COA Seeking Wheelchairs 





HUGH RODHAM, Hillary 
Clinton's father, and Henry 
Bosworth at Great Lakes Naval 
lY'aining Center. 



The Council on Aging is 
in uigent need of woodoi or 
metal vtiieekdiairs of all azes 
and canes to he^ disabled 



sem<Ms to get around. 

If ymi have (Mie, call iht 
council at 617-376-1506. 



HILLARY CLINTON shed a tear here in Quincy during 
1996 Democratic rally. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth 

to a high school picnic. You better be ready." 

We weren't 
overly fond of 
him at first, but 
by the time we 
finished boots, a 
bunch of kids 
who made up 
most of 

Company 1968 
had gotten the 
message. And 
later 
appreciated it. 

Sometimes I 
think I see some 
of her father's 
toughness in 
her. But I found 
out that day, she 
can be 

sentimental, 
too. 

For the last 
four years of the 
Clinton 
Presidency I 
received a 
Christmas card from the White House. 

I found her that day in 1996 to be a dynamic 
campaigner. Great on her feet. Articulate. 
Knowledgeable. 

I remember writing at the time: "You may like her. Or 
dislike her. But you can't ignore her. She is a major 
player on the national political scene. 

"There are those out there looking for the first woman 
president and see Hillary Rodham Clinton or someone 
like her." 

Now campaigning hard to be that first woman 
president she fmds herself the target of her rivals. 

Barack Obama and John Edwards ganged up on her 
during that pre-primary debate in New Hampshire but 
Hillary knows how to play hard-ball. 

By winning New Hampshire, she slowed down the 
Obama train-momentarily at least-and gave us more 
time to look him over. And the other candidates, too. 

Obama is the best speaker among all the candidates- 
Democrat and Republican-but you would like to know 
more about what he would do as president. And what 
the other candidates would do including Hillary. 

Right now I dcMi't know who I'll vote for. Maybe a 
Democrat. Maybe a Republican. I'd like to hear more 
about the issues and where each of the candidates 
stands. I haven't heard enough to make up my mind. 

Did Hillary shed her tear or two in New Hampshire 
for the sympathy vote as her critics claim? 

I'd like to think it was a sign that as politically tough 
as she can be, she's only human, too. 

Like that sentimental moment in Quincy. 



tmm 



Thursday, January 17, 2908 T^eQuJncySmi Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




■ ■ -*, . " ' ■ ■■■' 



THIS IS A 1924 real photo postcard view of the drive- 
way entrance to the Eastern Nazarene College at 23 East 
Elm Avenue in Wollaston. They had moved here in 1919. 
The building shown here was originally built as the re- 
tirement home for Josiah Quincy, Jr., when he com- 
pleted his term as Mayor of Boston in 1849. He was the 
second of three Josiah Quincy 's to be Mayor of Boston. 
After he died in 1882 the private Quincy Mansion School 
for Girls used his home until the college bought it. At 



the time of this picture, the college only had three other 
small buildings on its campus. As they expanded and 
built more buildings they kept this original building for 
many years, but finally the house was razed and part 
of this site is now home to their church on East Elm 
and Wendell Avenues. To contact Tom Galvin, e-mail 
tmgal vin @ verizon.net 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Hits Week 

1991 

17 Years Ago 



Readers Forljm 



School Safety No. 1 Priority 



I am writing in response 
to the letter published in the 
Jan. 3 editioa of T^e Quincy 
Sun. It is my hope tfiat the 
response will ease some of 
the concerns that may have 
been raised by the letter. 

As the Director of Secu- 
rity for the Quincy Public 
Schools, I know that the 
School Committee along 
with the Superintendent of 
Schools hold the safety of 
our students and staff as the 
number one priority, as well 
as our police and fire depart- 
ments. Our school conmiit- 
tee has a locked door policy 
for all schools and has pro- 
vided every school with sur- 
veillance equipment. When 
you visit any of our schools 
you are either met by a secu- 
rity person or have to sign in 
at the office. With our prior- 
ity on security, we now have 
nine security officers in our 
high schools. These security 
staff also covers the other 
schools within the system as 
needed. 

Mayor Phelan also made 
school security a number one 
priority. He budgeted two 
school resource officers who 
are housed in the high 
schools and act as resources 
to both students and staff^, 
working closely with the 
deans. We are fortunate to 
have two Dare ofRcers as- 
signed to the elementary and 
middle schools. Their func- 
tion in our schools is to work 
with elementary and middle 
school students, teaching 
decision-making skills in the 
areas of drug use and vio- 
lence protection. 



Some years ago the police 
formed a community-polic- 
ing unit made up of ten pa- 
trol officers, a sergeant, and 
a lieutenant. These officers 
are assigned to different sec- 
tions of the city. They are 
very familiar with the fami- 
lies in their area and some of 
the problems they may be 
facing. It is not unusual to see 
a community officer walking 
the halls of our schools 
speaking with some of our 
students and administrators. 

In a new initiative, the 
Quincy Police are training in 
"emergency response" to any 
situation of a school safety 
nature. They are actually us- 
ing our schools as training 
venues. 

Quincy Public Schools 
has developed another very 
significant partnership with 
the Transit Authority Police. 
Out of this collaboration a 
new and very effective ini- 
tiative has been formed. 
Working together, we have 
instituted a program called 
"Stop Watch." The program 
is nationally recognized as a 
way to get to know students 
in a non-threatening way to 
prevent violence and crime 
in the transit system and sur- 
rounding community. The 
program is a collaboration 
between school and court 
personnel and the Quincy 
and Transit Police Depart- 
ments. 

Another extremely suc- 
cessful program is our 
monthly "Roundtable Meet- 
ing." This is a proactive col- 
laboration of the District 
Attorney's Office, the 



Quincy Police Department 
and Transit Police Depart- 
ment that meet at our 
monthly "Round Table" 
meetings where we meet to 
discuss issues of potential 
concern and offer training to 
members on current school 
safety issues and effective 
responses to these situations. 
The tragic events that 
have taken place across the 
country have forced commu- 
nities and specifically school 
departments to take a hard 
look at how to plan for and 
respond to potential inci- 
dents. The day after the Col- 
umbine tragedy 1 was 
charged, as Director of Se- 
curity, to formulate an Emer- 
gency Procedures Protocol 
for the Quincy Public 
Schools. Collaborating with 
other school administrators, 
we attended as many train- 
ing sessions as were avail- 
able and, along with mem- 
bers of the Quincy Police 
Department, Quincy Fire 
Department, the Sheriff's 
Department and the District 



Attorney's Office, met to 
write these comprehensive 
procedures. 

These emergency proce- 
dures are practiced at every 
school in the system in the 
fall and spring. These proce- 
dures are reviewed and 
evaluated at the end of each 
year and are revised as 
needed. Our "Emergency 
Procedures" have been used 
by many of our neighboring 
cities and towns as a tem- 
plate for their own proce- 
dures. 

In closing, we are well 
aware of the fact that vio- 
lence has and can strike any- 
where. Our conmiitment to 
the safety and well being of 
students and staff is para- 
mount. I am confident that 
we have systems and proce- 
dures in place and also know 
that vigilance is practiced by 
all. As always, administra- 
tors and I are available at any 
time to discuss concems that 
anyone may have. 

Kenneth McPhee 
Director of Security 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Sheets To Submit 
$123.6 Million Budget 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

Mayor James A. Sheets said that he will likely submit 
his budget of $123,600,000 for fiscal 1992 by level 
funding fire, police and education 
while cutting all other departments 
by four percent. 

The budget, which will be 
submitted to the City Council for 
approval the first week in April, 
doesn't include money for capital 
outlay or raises for employees in the city's 21 unions. 

In his mid-term address 1 days ago, the mayor gave the 
school, police and fire departments top funding priority 
for FY'92, which will begin July 1 . He said that he would 
not close one fire station as a means of saving city dollars. 
Instead, he said he would maintain the present levels of 
fire equipment and number of patrol officers. 

ANSFXMO WILLING TO RETURN TO BOARD 

Former School Committee member Frank Anselmo 
whose resignation two weeks ago touched off a small 
political controversy regarding a successor, offered a 
solution to the issue of filling his seat. 

In a phone interview with The Quincy Sun, Anselmo, 
92, who resigned because of health concems Jan. 2, said 
he would finish his term if the city permitted him. 

However, Anselmo will not get the chance. Because his 
letter of resignation was signed and received by City Clerk 
John Gillis, Mayor Sheets said the resignation could not 
be withdrawn. Gillis, who contracted the state for its 
ruling, agreed. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Council President Ted DeCristofaro 



Critical Of Letter 
On School Safety 



I read with interest Chris- 
tina Randall's letter of Jan. 3 
regarding school safety in 
Quincy. 

One could perhaps sym- 
pathize with her lengthy tale 
of the city ofHcials who de- 
cUned to speak to her on the 
issue-although they may 
have taken her more seri- 
ously if instead of claiming 
that her "certifications" in 



"Death Education and Grief 
Counseling" qualified her as 
an expert on school safety- 
she instead possessed cre- 
dentials in security or law 
enforcement. No doubt The 
Quincy Sun could give her a 
forum to present a summary 
both of her proposals to 
make Quincy schools safer 
and her estimate of the cost 
(Cont'd On Page 8) 



City uouncii fresmem lea uet^risioiaro was 

presented an appreciation award by the Quincy Jewish 
War Veterans Post 193 and the members of the Beth Israel 
Brotherhood. The presentation was made jointly by JWV 
Commander Bernard Shaffer, and Brotherhood 
President Bemie Reisberg... The Montclair Deh, 218 
West Squantum St., North Quincy, was offering "Free Hot 
Dogs" at their Grand Opening, Monday, Jan. 21... The 
Quincy Licensing Board approved a request from Alfred 
Graziano, Jr. of Grazioso's DeH Shoppe to extend his 
license to include two tables with seating for four to eight 
people in the shop . . . The Quincy Sun 's Sunbeam' s column 
was questioning whether or not former Ward One 
Councillor and Council President Leo J. Kelly would run 
for councillor at-large in the fall elections... Jennifer 
Raftery, 48 Norton Rd., and Eileen P. McCluskey, 24 
Overlook Rd., both of Merrymount, were named to the 
Fall Semester's Dean's List at the University of Rhode 
Island... Gerald (Jerry) Gherardi, 78, a long time 
humanitarian, was named The Quincy Sun 's 1990 Citizen 
of the Year. Gherardi was a guidance counselor in the 
Quincy school system. . . Prevites' Market, 72 Sumner St., 
Quincy Point, was offering "Perdue 4-Star Turkey Breast 
for $2.99 lb" ... Dr. Mark Jaehnig, treasurer of the South 
Shore Chiropractic Society, presented a holiday 
contribution to Fr. Bill's Place Shelter... Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Spink, Wilgus Rd., Germantown, welcomed a 
granddaughter, bom to David and Paula Spink at Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital... George White, chairman of the 
Quincy Festival Parade Committee, said the committee 
would meet Jan. 23 to start planning the 40* annual 
festival parade to be held in Nov. 1991... The Quincy 
Interfaith Sheltering Coalition honored the Quincy Police 
Department for its outstanding service to homeless shelters. 
The award was accepted by Police Chief Francis 
Mullen... The Quincy High School A.F.R.O.T.C. drill 
team took fu^st place in the recent compulsory team drill 
routine at Cranston, RI East High School. . . Morrill Real 
Estate, 645 Hancock St., was plaiming to hold a "First 
Time Home Buyers Seminar" at the firm's office, Jan. 
28... Dr. Sheldon W. Bennett presided at the Sunday 
service at the United First Parish Church, Quincy Center. 
His sermon was titled "Our Words Are Us"... Kristin 
Fiacco,daughterofNoreenFiaccoof Quincy, was selected 
to play the saxophone for the Eastern Nazarene College 
Wind Ensemble. . . The North Quincy High hockey team 
snapped Quincy High's five-game unbeaten streak with a 
' 2->l- win at- the -Quincy .Youth Ar«n».<.- 



Pi«e6 TI«»Q«Ma^7 



y^fntoy* fmi¥>n 11* ^W 



Arts & Entertainment 



Free Indian Dance Recital 
At Thomas Crane Library 



A free performance of the 
classical Indian dance called 
Bharatanatyam will be pre- 
sented at the Thomas Crane 
Public Library, 40 Washing- 
ton St., Quincy, Sunday, Jan. 
27 at 3 p.m. 

Dance in India is an age- 
old tradition, and u.sed as a 
vehicle of worship and com- 
munication. Bharatanatyam 
is one of the most subtle, so- 
phisticated and graceful 
styles of dance art in the 
world. The dancer is consid- 
ered a worshiper of the Di- 
vine. 

The word bha represents 
bhavani or facial expression, 
ra represents the ragam or 
music and tha for thalam or 
the rhythm. The 

Bharatanatyam suite of 
dances will be performed in 
its traditional order by dancer 
and teacher Jeyanthi R. 




JEYANTHI R.GHATRAJU 

Ghatraju and her senior stu- 
dents from the Natyanjali 
Sch(M)l of Dance in Andover. 
Introductions and explana- 
tions of the dances will be 
provided in English. 

Jeyanthi Ghatraju re- 
ceived her training in 
Bharata Natyam in the 



Village School 
Open House 

(\)iiic Join us on Saturday 
January 26 9:00- 11 :(K)am 



>.^^^f,^. 




Ma,v^ 






Offering a warm, nurturing 
environment to the children ages 
2.9 - 6 years old. 
Half day morning and afternoon 
programs and extended day enrich- 
ment programs including art enrich- 
ment and science and discovery. 
State of the art outdoor play area and a 
lending library with books for children 
and parents. 

Accredited by the NAEYC. 
Has been offering exceptional 
childcare to families since 1966. 



This is a great opportunity to tour the school, 

meet some of the staff and get a sense of what 

the Village School is all about. 

112 Randolph Avenue. Milton, MA 02 186 617-698-2150 
Accredited by the NAEYC 



Thanjavur style from several 
gurus including the 
Shivanjali Temple of Arts, 
Coimbatore, India. She 
taught this art form at the 
Natyanjali School in Ottawa, 
Canada, prior to moving to 
Massachusetts and founding 
the Natyanjali School of 
Dance. 

Jeyanthi is affiliated with 
the Alagappa Performing 
Arts Academy of the 
Alagappa University, 
Karaikudi, India and offers 
certificate and degree 
courses in Bharata Natyam. 
She and her students perform 
regularly in the New En- 
gland area. 

This free performance is 
sponsored by the Friends of 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library. For more informa- 
tion, call 617-376-1301 or 
visit thomascranelibrary.org. 



The All New 



school fj/ iinisW 

All Ages. All Levels. All Music. 



located 10 min. from Qwincy Center 

Give the Gift 
Of Music! 

Grand Re-Opening Season! 

Pu'drasc gift (wtifiiole In musi( lessons tills InMoy season 
Enioll in private lessons at iIm Bosse Sdnol of Misk this foil 
seoson ond wpetienfe out bwid nw, stntt of llw at facility 

Tfie new Bosse Sdwol of Music is still 

convenienriy iocotad ot the Middle Street Place 

cofTipisx in Weymouth, Ma. We ore now on the 

apposite side oi the building in o new and 

lorgec space. (998 Middle Street) 

• PHVATI INSnUCTKW foi au. 
INSTRUMHfTS& VOICE 

Quitar, Bus, Dmms, Piano, 
Saxophone, Clarinet. Flute. Oboe. 
Ba.ssoon.Trumpei, TYombone. 
Violin, Viola. Cello, and Mandolin 

• nuvAniNsnuaioNiN: 

Music Theory. Ear Training. 

Arranging, Sungwriting, 

Recording Technology 
•ENSEMHEIIOGUM 
•GROUP ClASSiS 
•INSnUMiNTIENTALS 
' lUSKi U. ■OOC t ACCESSO WES 
For mom infomation, p/ease call 

781-337-8500 



wwvv bosst-M hoolotmusic .loin 



Kenneth Gloss Speaker 
At Christ Church 



The Christ Church 
Women's Guild will host a 
lecture by Kenneth Gloss, 
proprietor of the nationally 
known Brattle Book Shop in 
Boston Thursday, Jan. 24 at 
1 2:30 p.m. at the Christ Epis- 
copal Church, 40 Washing- 
ton St. 

Featuring treasures in the 
attic, old and rare books. 
Gloss said, "New England 
homes are treasure-troves for 
old and rare books that have 
increased the value over the 
years." "We invite the pub- 
lic to bring any volumes they 
want to know about to the 
lecture for a free verbal ap- 
praisal." 

Gloss is a member and 
past president of the New 
England Antiquarian Book- 
sellers Association, the 
Bostonian Society and the 
Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island Antiqurian Booksell- 
ers. 

He serves as a member of 
the advisory board of the 
USS Constitution Museum 
and was a member o the ad- 




KENNETH GLOSS 



visory committee of the Bos- 
ton Public Library. 

He has been seen ont the 
PBS' Antiques Roadshow, 
and has been a popular guest 
on WBZ Radio, as well as 
other radio, TV and cable 
stations in New England and 
nationally. 



Gloss will bring to the 
lecture a 1912 World Series 
scorecard and examples of 
old LIFE magazines. Also a 
sales brochure for the TI- 
TANIC;. 

For more information, 
call the Brattle Book Shop at 
1-800-447-9595. 



Sunken Treasure In Boston Harbor 
Topic At Crane Library Jan. 23 



A free program entitled 
"What Lies Beneatii: Sunken 



^ ALWAYS BimNG^ 
NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line ofSuppUes 
Free Estimates 



Treasure In Boston Harbor" 
will be held Tuesday, Jan. 23 
at 7 p.m. in the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, Wash- 
ington St., Quincy. 

The program, featuring a 
discussion by Professor 



Allen Gontz, is sponsored by 
the Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission, Mayor 
Thomas Koch and Chairman 
Leo Kelly. 

For more information, call 
617-773-1534. 




Over 45 years of setting the standard 

and leading the way for our youth 

and their future! 



;d Heart School of North Quincy 

370 Hancock Street ♦ North Quincy, MA 02171 

6i7.3a8.383O ♦ WWW.SHSQUINCY.ORG 



accTBdited member of NEASC sifH^e 1995 

Currantly enrolling Pre-K through QrMla Eight fw 200B-2009. 
For more information, contact tlie echool office. 

A MOMAN CATHOUC COMMmJOOTr WALKING TOGETHEM IN FAITH, WOMSHi^ EDUCATiON, AND SERVICE 




The 1930s ushered in a style of music that became the most 
accessible and popular in jazz history. In 1935, when the United 
States was recovering from the Great Depression, big bands 
flourished as the dance craze swept the country Nationwide 
exposure via radio broadcasts and recordings propelled swing 
music into popular culture. By the late 1930s and early 1940s, 
Swing had become the most popular musical style and remained 
so for several years. Pop standards sung by crooners who 
emerged from the Big Band tradition became pop icons in the 
late 1940s. Bandleaders such as Glenn Miller and Benny 
Goodman helped Americans get out of the Great Depression 
and onto the dance floor. 

Please join us for our "Musk of Our Uves" celebration. 
Enjoy fdk>wship with your friends, family and neighbors. Ills a 
"Swingin Afisur" with Donnie Norton! 

JANUARY 21, 2008 • 1:30 - 3:00 PM. 
R-S.VP to (61 7) 4714457 



* 



RIVER BAY CLUB 

-Qn-a 



tLMv 
99BadanSaw 
Qukiq^ MA 02169 
wmtmiiiiilili living COM 



Music »OuR Lives 



ft 



'il^iriA»f,'MiiMry)^:2m ttAtftiaS^Wiak "fi^J 



Sec I At- 



Marcia Zanardelli Wed 
To Michael Flagg 

A reception at the Best 
Western Adams Inn at the 
Gazebo followed the recent 
wedding of Marcia 
Zanardelli and Michael 
Flagg. Rev. Dominic Menna 
performed the ceremony in 
St. Mary's Church. 

The bride is the daughter 
of Kathleen and John 
Zanardelli of Quincy. The 
bride wore her 

grandmother's wedding 
band, and bracelet, and car- 
ried her mother's purse. 

The groom is the son of 
Ms. Denise McKenna of 
Quincy. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride was at- 
tended by Nicole Zanardelli, 
Maid of Honor for her sister. 

Adriana Daignault, niece 
of the groom was flower girl. 

Matthew Sloat was Best 
Man. 

The bride is a graduate of mR. and MRS. MICHAEL FLAGG 

Quincy High School, and is (John Delaney Photo) 

employed as a claim repre- from Quincy High School, ^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 

sentative at Ace USA, Bos- and is a member of the Bahamas, the couple are re- 
ton. Bricklayer's Union Local #3 aiding in Braintree. 

The groom graduated and also Flagg Painting. 

NQHS 1958 Class Seeks Missing 
Members For October Reunion 





FIVE OLD FRIENDS who grew up in Squantum celebrated more than 60 years of friendship 
recently after attending 50th year reunions at their respective high schools. North Quincy and 
Archbishop Williams. Left to right, front row, Judy Ranahan Dengler of El Cajon, Calif. 
(A WHS), Edie Cleveland Allen of Quincy (NQHS), Lois Joy Pbnentel of Quincy (NQHS); back 
row, Florence Cook Ragusa of Quincy (NQHS), Julie Sullivan Qeland of Valparaiso, Ind. 
(A WHS), Nancy Abbott Keams of Quincy (A WHS). 

Four From Quincy Honored At Thayer 



The North Quincy High 
School class of 1958 will 
hold its 50* anniversary re- 
union Oct. 10-11 at the Best 
Western Adams Inn, 
Hancock St., North Quincy. 

The committee is seeking 
to locate 18 "missing" class- 
mates. Anyone with informa- 
tion about their addresses are 
asked to call Mary Hayes at 
617-347-9382 or Atty. Greg 
Galvin, 781-340-5335. 

The 1 8 classmates sought 
are: 

Marie E. Boyajian, Leo 
G. Clark, Louise A. Clark- 
Traynum, Joanne F. Dolphin, 



Ann Duffy Jenkins, 
Catherine Glennon, Diane 
Langille Graban, Isabelle 
Leone, Lawrence J. McGee, 
Elizabeth McNealy, 

Lauraine C. Mercer, William 



Reagan, William Reardon, 
Margaret Redcay Butts, 
Elaine Schaffer Kenny, 
Raymond F. Smith, Robert 
J.R Walsh and Elizabeth 
Walsh Jordan. 



Uttte Willows Preschool A Doycore 

O r^ Educational Oosszs 

• ^-^Vy Full/PT - Low Ratios 

Certified/ Licensed Teaching Staff 

Open EnroUaient M 
New Toddler Program 
in Spring 




90 Willow St., Wolloston 
617-773-6173 

NAEYC Accredited 

We accept Scholarships & Voches 



f 



Four students from 
Quincy have been named to 
the honor roll for the first tri- 
mester at the Thayer Acad- 
emy Middle School in 
Braintree. 

Alison E. Eleey, Grade 8, 
honors for academic 
achievement and effort. 

Cindy K. Le, Grade 8, 
honors for academic 

Save Gas 
and Money 

Shop Locally 



achievement. Samantha E. Whalen, 

Sage A. Lee, Grade 6, Grade 8, high honors for aca- 

high honors for academic demic achievement and hon- 

achievement and honors for ors for effort, 
effort. 



l.KARN - K) - SKATK C LASSKS 



Children (4"^ up) & Adults 

BAY STATE SKATING SCHOOL 

Register Now For New Classes! 

WEYMOUTH CONNELL RINK 

Sundays 5pm Starts Jan. 27 

QUINCY SHEA RINK 

Fridays 4pm Start Jan. 18 
Sundays 11am Start Jan. 20 

(781) 890-8480 
www.bavstateskatineschool.ore 







C«r lOTO 



Est. 1972 by Russell Affsa 




S TL V t 

S' T Y L E 



Whatever Your Style 

We Can Do It. 
We now have later hours 
Call for your appointment today. for your convenience 



JEWELRY 



I^pl50n Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 617-786-7942 

January Birthstone is Garnet - Handicapped Accessible 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unity Candles 



KKLKMOIS 
AKTKLKS 



CROSSING. 



Rosary Beads 



BOOKS '(nns 

'mISK .BIBI.KS; 



25 BEALE STREET 
Men - Sat 9:30ain - 6:30pin 



WOLLASTON 
(617) 471-0990 




SOCIAL CENTER 



SONS OF ITALY 

Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy 
Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs. 
Call about our Wedding Packages... 
617-472-5900 www.Quincy.S01.com 



FUNCTION HALL 



THE TIRRELL ROOM 

QUINCY ELKS 

As advertised in New England Bride 

www.thetiiTeUrooni.com 

Weddings * Banquets * Showers * Birthdays * All Occasions 
254 Quarry St. Quincy 617-847-6149 



FLORISTS 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 

761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

617-773-7620 



FUNCTION HALL 



ADAMS 
HEIGHTS 

All Occasions 

63 Bower Rd., 

Quincy 

617-773-4750 



This Space 
Available 

To Advertise 
Here, Call 

617-471-3100 



Pages 



Jhand$yj^mimmry 17, 



*.-'' 



Davis Names Council 



Koch Gets An 'A' In 



Committee Chairmen First Snow Storm Test 



(Cont'd From Page I) 

Members of committees 
with five councillors include: 

Environment & Public 
Health - Kelly chair (reap- 
pointed). Vice chair Gutro; 
Ward 2 Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi, At Large Coun- 
cillor Joseph Finn and 
Coughlin members. 

Public Works - Finn chair 
(reappointed). McNamee 
vice chair, Keenan, Coughlin 
and Kelly members. 

Park & Recreation - 
Gutro chair, Coughlin vice 
chair, Finn, McNamee and 
At Large Councillor Michael 



McFarland members. 

Public Safety - CoughUn 
chair, Raymondi vice chair, 
McNamee, Gutro and 
Keenan members. 

Rules - Coughlin chair, 
McFarland vice chair, Finn, 
Keenan and Kelly members. 

Senior Citizens 
Raymondi chair, Gutro vice 
chair, Kelly, McNamee and 
Finn members. 

Education - McFarland 
chair (reappointed), Finn 
vice chair, Keenan, 
Raymondi and Coughlin 
members. 

Downtown & Economic 



Growth - Kelly chair (reap- 
pointed), Keenan vice chair, 
Finn, Gutro and McFarland 
members. 

Veterans Services - 
Keenan chair (reappointed), 
Kelly vice chair, McNamee, 
Gutro and McFarland mem- 
bers. 

Library & Historic Places 
- McNamee chair (reap- 
pointed), McFarland vice 
chair, Coughlin, Raymondi 
and Keenan members. 

Housing - Finn chair (re- 
appointed), Kelly vice chair, 
Raymondi, McNamee and 
Gutro members. 



(Cont'd From Page I) 

opened. 

"The DPW, the Police and 
the Mayor's office met Sun- 
day afternoon to plan strat- 
egy," said Walker. 

"We declared an emer- 
gency Sunday at midnight. It 



remained in effect until 6 
a.m. Tuesday. We sent the 
DPW door-to-door to advise 
people to get their cars off the 
streets to make way for the 
plows." 

"The city was prepared 
for the worst," said Mayor 
Koch. "I'm proud of the way 



we reacted." 

Meanwhile, the weather 
was preparing another test 
for the Koch administration 
— a chance of snow this af- 
ternoon; snow and rain for 
tomorrow, according to the 
forecasters. 







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1 155 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
617-773-2142 


Ample Parking in rear Walk ins Welcome 
Tues-Thurs 9-9, Fri 9-7, Sat 9-5 




Cardiovascular disease is one of the most pressing health concerns in our region. 

South Shore Hospital's Cardiovascular Center team is dedicated to providing 
community pfx)grams that promote the early detection, treatment and 
management of these diseases. 

CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH: WHAT YOU CAM DO 
Satmtlay, January 19, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
at Lantana, 43 Scanlon Driva, Randolpli 

Learn ftx)m our cardiovascular e]q>ats what you can do to minimize your risk 
of having a hean attack, stroke or other i^th complications. 

Conplimcatuy ooodnaital bicakfiMt and hiadi are indndcdi 

Advance reservations are encouraged because seating is limited at this free 
community bet^fits program. 




Gutro Trustee Of Harbor Association 



Ward 5 City Councillor 
Doug Gutro has been elected 
to the board of trustees of the 
clean water advocacy group. 
The Boston Harbor Associa- 
tion. 

"We're thrilled that Doug 
Gutro has agreed to be on our 
board of trustees," said 
Vivien Li, the executive di- 
rector of the TBHA. 

"Doug was a pioneer in 
the revitalization of 
Wollaston Beach, beginning 
with his work in the 'Back 
to the Beaches' campaign 
and his extensive contribu- 
tions to the development of 
the 1999 'Plan to restore 
Water Quality to Wollaston 
Beach; 

"Doug was instrumental 



in securing funds to imple- 
ment the plan, which has re- 
sulted in better water quaUty 
at the beach and his leader- 
ship in the 'Back to the 
Beaches' effort resulted in a 
number of improvements at 
Wollaston Beach. 

"In addition, Doug has 
worked with volunteers in 
coordinating storm drain 
stenciling activities, which 
discourages dumping into 
storm drains which flow to 
Wollaston Beach and Boston 
Harbor." 

Gutro said he "couldn't 
be prouder than to be asked 
to serve as a trustee to TBHA 
— an organization which has 
fought for a clean, alive and 
accessible Boston Harbor for 



more than three decades. 

"Ten years ago, when I 
began my advocacy for a 
cleaner, healthier Wollaston 
Beach, it was The Boston 
Harbor Association who 
stepped up early and often to 
provide recommendations 
and resources that have led 
to a cleaner, purer coastline 
for Quincy." 

Gutro is also a co-founder 
of the Friends of Wollaston 
Beach and a member of the 
Metropolitan Beaches Com- 
mission, a legislative-initi- 
ated group that is focused on 
the revitalization of public 
beaches from Nantasket to 
Nahant. 

His term as a trustee of 
TBHA continues through 
November, 2010. 



Critical Of Letter On School Safety 



(Cont'd From Page 5) 

to the taxpayers of her rec- 
ommendations, although 
surely she could have done 
so in her letter had she cho- 
sen. 

That being said, since Ms. 
Randall claims to be knowl- 
edgeable on the subject and 
in the Columbine incident in 
particular, she would know 
that at Columbine (and as has 



been commonly the case in 
school shootings) the perpe- 
trators invaded the school 
openly armed and began 
blazing away, something 
which all the metal detectors 
and guards in the world can- 
not prevent. Such shootings 
have taken place in the face 
of all manner of security 
measures; as to that, the Red 
Lake High massacre two 



years ago began with the 
gunman killing the security 
guard manning the school's 
metal detector. 

The unfortunate truth is 
that the common element in 
all these attacks has been the 
ease in which troubled teens 
have obtained firearms. 

Robert Traynor 
Sumner Street 



AHENTION QUINCY RESIDENTS 

DUE TO THE MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY HOLI- 
DAY MONDAY, JAN. 21, 2008, TRASH COLLECTION 
WILL BE A DAY LATE NEXT WEEK. THERE WILL BE A 
SATURDAY COLLECTION FORTRASH USUALLY COL- 
LECTED ON FRIDAY. THIS APPLIES TO ALL ROUTES. 

Allied Waste Services 



BATES & RIORDAN, lip 

Attorneys At Law 





Theodore Rk>nlan,EM|. 

Fofmer cletk. RI Supreme Couil 



Deborah Bates Riordaii, Esq. 

None- Attorney 



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At Keohane Funeral and Cremation Service we believe a funeral should be a celebration of a life 
that has been Uved, a time of fond memories, sweet recollections and thankfulness for the time we 
enjoyed with our loved one. 

We also believe a funeral should be as unique as the person it celebrates. Our helpful team of 
caring professionals will take the time to learn about your loved one. We will then help design a 
unique and personal service for your family and friends. 



Over the past 75 years, our 
warm and attentive service and 
affirmative approach to funeral 
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Keohane Funeral and Cremation Service was founded by Cornelius V. Keohane in 
1932 at a storefront location in North Quincy. That tradition has been fostered by 
Edward Keohane, his sons, Dennis and John and a talented team of professionals. 




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The Christian Science Reading Room 

18 Beale Street, Wollaston, MA 02169 
Call: 617-472-7099 • E-mail: fcaquincyrr@verizon.net 

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Adult and Graduate Studies 

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New Opera Premieres Tonight At ENC QC AP CitCS Heating Oil 

Costs Top Emergency 



When Quincy composer 
Dclvyn Case decided to 
write an opera about reli- 
gious tolerance, he chose a 
rather unlikely source of in- 
spiration: The Prioress's 
Tale, one of Chaucer's famed 
Canterbury Tales that fea- 
tures decidedly anti-Semitic 
overtones. 

An assistant professor of 
music at Eastern Nazarene 
College. Case was only too 
aware of the sensitivity in- 
volved in a Christian liberal 
arts college presenting an 
opera based on an anti- 
Semitic story. He reached 
out. therefore, to local rab- 



bis and members of the 
South Shore's Jewish com- 
munity to gain their input as 
to the best way to transform 
Chaucer's tale into a moving 
musical plea for religious 
tolerance and cultural under- 
standing. 

The result is The 
Prioress's Talc, Case's origi- 
nal one-act chamber opera 
which will make its pre- 
miere at Eastern Nazarene 's 
Cove Fine Arts Center to- 
night (Thursday). 

Directed by Andrew 
Ryker. the performance will 
feature three of Boston's best 
young opera singers in the 



principal roles. A panel dis 
cussion involving both 
Christian and Jewish clergy 
will follow the 7 p.m. perfor- 
mance. 

The Prioress's Tale pre- 
mieres tonight (Thursday) at 
7 p.m. at Eastern Nazarene 
College's Cove Fine Arts 
Center, 23 East Elm Ave., 
Quincy. An encore perfor- 
mance will be held Saturday 
January 19 at 7 p.m. Admis- 
sion is $10 for adults and $5 
for seniors; students of all 
ages are free. 

For more information, 
call 617-745-3614. 




Exceptional service. 



Strong advocacy. 



Dedication to clients. 



For all your legal needs, 
Christim: Cedrone Logan & Associates, P.C. 

21 M( Grvih HuaiwAN, Siitk 306 
Qi INC V, MA 02169 

Tki: (617) 934-0709 
Fax: (617) 328-0689 

K-M\ir: clogan(a cedronelaw.com 

All. MAJOR C RKDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 




MASSACHUSETTS 
PRIMARY ELECTIONS 

Tuesday, February 5, 2008 

Last Day To Register For 

Primary Elections Is 

Wednesday, January 16, 2008 

At Quincy City Hall 

1305 Hancock Street 

From 8:30AM to 8PM 



Board of Registrars 

William P. Draicchio 

Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

Peter P. Gacicia 

Denis Tardo, Chairman 



(Cont'd From Page 3) 

gages) are coming up, " 
said StroUo, urging people to 
act before an emergency." 
Some folks really were mis- 
led." 

"We can't save every- 
body; that's not our goal," 
said Caswell who cited the 
$ 1 25 million mortgage relief 
program recently packaged 
by the Federal Reserve Bank 
and five Boston banks. 

Under the Federal Hous- 
ing Administration program, 
qualified homeowners will 
be able to refinance their ad- 
justable rate mortgages to 
fixed rate 30-year mortgages, 
'if you're having a hard 
time making that mortgage 
payment, you ' ve got to come 
in early," said Caswell who 
added that, unfortunately, 
"People don't want to admit 
they have a difficult situa- 
tion." 

Caswell described a fam- 
ily who lost their home after 
poor financial decisions. 
They were only five years 
away from paying off their 
mortgage when they ran into 
problems. 

Unfortunately, they were 
only days away from the auc- 
tion of their house when they 



finally sought help and that 
was too late, according to 
Caswell 

Success Story 

In contrast, Strollo intro- 
duced a young woman from 
Wollaston whose home was 
saved through QCAP inter- 
vention. The young woman 
asked that her name be with- 
held. 

"A foreclosure would 
have happened, due to our 
having a baby daughter and 
my being laid off for a year." 
the woman said of her 
family's financial 

problems. "These are things 
you can't always plan for." 

Both she and her husband 
work and they ' ve owned their 
home for seven years. They 
had a reasonable fixed mort- 
gage rate, but that wasn't 
enough when problems hit. 

She expected to return to 
work full time after their first 
baby was bom. Then, there 
was one problem after an- 
other. Their baby was sick 
and she was laid off 

QCAP helped the family 
through the emergencies and 
helped the couple rebudget 
their funds. 

Now, QCAP is "trying to 
help me refinance. I'm try- 



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ing to get a lower monthly 
payment." 

They're almost back on 
their feet and she expects to 
add a part-time paycheck to 
her husband's paycheck to 
help ease the family finances. 

Most importantly, their 
baby is healthy now. 
Looming Credit Cnincli 

For Strollo and Caswell, 
the current mortgage fore- 
closure crisis is just the tip of 
the iceberg. Both beheve that 
a credit crisis is ahead. 

Strollo described people 
using their credit cards for 
essential living expenses, 
"people who have been us- 
ing their credit cards for food, 
heat, gasoHne." They come 
in with thousands of dollars 
of credit card debt for essen- 
tials. 

Sometimes, Strollo said, 
people are opening cards in 
their children's names to 
cover heating bills, "People 
are desperate to keep their 
heat on." 

Strollo said those children 
will have bad credit before 
they are even of legal age. 

"There has been a lot of 
loose credit flying around," 
said Caswell who agreed that 
financial education should 
start early. "It does need to 
start in high school." 

Now, said Strollo, credit 
card companies are targeting 
high school students, teen- 
agers in high school. 

"Fifteen, sixteen year olds 
have credit cards. They 
shouldn't." said Strollo. 

Both Strollo and Caswell 
pointed out how important 
good credit is in any pur- 
chasing, in job applications, 
and in housing. 

For more information on 
refinancing an adjustable rate 
mortgage, under the 
FHASecure program, visit 
www.fha.gov. 

Strollo welcomes all in- 
quires on housing questions, 
educafion, at QCAP, 617- 
479-8181, EXT. 100. 

Founded in 1965, QCAP 
serves Quincy, Braintree, 
Weymouth, Milton and sur- 
rounding Norfolk County 
and South Shore communi- 
ties. The agency's motto is 
"Helping People Help Them- 
selves." 

QCAP's 23,000 indi- 
vidual clients and over 
10,000 households come 
from a variety of social, eco- 
nomic and ethnic back- 
grounds. Of that number, 
93% woiic, are unemployed 
and looking for work, or are 
disable or elderly. Only 7% 
of the famihes receive wel- 
fare. 

The agency's other pro- 
grams include an emergency 
food center, free income tax 
assistance, English courses 
as a second language, and 
early ^ucation programs. 



ThunNlay, Janaaiy 17, 2008 Tlkm Quiaoy 0ua Page 11 



Dr. Carmen Mariano 
Inaugurated As First 
President Of AWHS 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

lie schools; Director of Per- 
sonnel, assistant principal, 
and teacher of mathematics 
within the Quincy public 
school system; Campus Di- 
rector/Associate Dean for 
Quincy College's Plymouth 
campus; and National Staff 
Development Director of 
Educational Performance 
Systems, Inc. 

Dr. Mariano earned his 
B.A. in from The Catholic 
University in Washington, 
D.C.; his Masters' Degree in 
Education from Harvard 



University, and his Doctor- 
ate in Educational Leader- 
ship from Boston College. 

He has authored dozens of 
articles for publication in 
numerous professional jour- 
nals and has spoken to audi- 
ences in 25 states and 5 coun- 
tries on topics including 
leadership, motivation, cour- 
age, goal-setting, communi- 
cation, and public speaking. 
Dr. Mariano has also served 
as an Adjunct Instructor at 
Framingham State College, 
Fitchburg State College, 
Curry College and Massasoit 



College. 

Archbishop Williams 
High School, located in 
Braintree, is a Catholic co- 
educational high school, 
which educates young men 
and women spiritually, aca- 
demically, morally and 
physically. A college-prepa- 
ratory school. Archbishop 
Williams High School 
graduates go on to study at 
leading colleges and univer- 
sities across the county. 

For additional informa- 
tion, call 781-843-3636 or 
visit www.awhs.org. 




DR. CARMEN MARIANO with state Treasurer Tim CahiU and Arciibisliop WiUiams seniors 
Nicole Alexopoulos (left) and Katherine Bossart at Ills inaugural as president 

Wollaston Beach Friends Meet Tonight 



Quincy College Offers FuUbright 
Foreign Language Program 



Quincy College is hosting 
a FuUbright Language 
Teaching Assistants 

(FLTAs), which will include 
Arabic and Mandarin Chi- 
nese. 

" I envision the FLTAs as 
cultural conduits and facili- 
tators," said Dr. Leor 
Alcalay, Quincy College 
Professor. " 

This academic year, the 
college is hosting Yanhong 



Zuo, from China, and Ismail 
Ben-Filali from Morocco. 
They will be joined in the 
spring semester by Zhongli 
Wang from China. 

The FLTAs are available 



to help all Quincy College 
students, including those not 
taking a language course, to 
gain a deeper appreciation of 
other cultures. 

Those interested may call 
Enrollment at 6 17-984- 1650. 

Help With Simple WiUs Monthly 

Atty. Ed Conroy will be erly with a free explanation 

at the Council on Aging of- of simple wills, 
fice, 83 Saratoga St., North Call 617-376-1506 for an 

Quincy, every third Friday of appointment, 
the month to assist the eld- 



The Friends of Wollaston 
Beach will hold their first 
annual meeting Thursday, 
Jan. 17, at 7 p.m. at 
Beechwood Knoll School, 
222 Fenno St. 

The agenda will include 
a review of the year 2007, the 
annual awards, the installa- 



tion of officers for 2008, and 
updates on plans for the com- 
ing year. 

A special guest speaker, 
historian Tom Galvin, will 
review the history of 
Wollaston Beach through 
historic photographs, post- 
cards and stories. 



Doors will open at 6:30 
p.m. and refreshments will 
be served. The meeting is 
open to the public at no 
charge but new members are 
always welcome. Dues are 
$10 a year. 

For more details, visit 
wwiv.woUastonbeach.org. 



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found just what I 

was looking for at 

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Soon I'll have 

my certificate in 

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and be working in an 

exciting medical field. " 

'Tim 



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over 30 areas of study. 

CerfHicafe Programs 

Associate Degree Programs 

Baccalaureate Degree 




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at Milton Hospital, you receive 
personalized, one-on-one care with 
dignity, privacy and warmth in a 
convenient, comfortable, thoroughly 
professional atmosphere. 

With an MRI Center and the latest 
diagnostic equipment (like GE 



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Antonia McGuire Resigns 
From Manet Health Center 



Antonia McGuire. RN, 
MPH. Manet Community 
Health Center's Chief Ex- 
ecutive Officer, has resigned 
her post after seven years. 
She has accepted a position 
us the next President and 
Chief Executive Officer at 
Great Brook Valley Health 
Center in Worcester. 

Accepting her resigna- 
tion. Robert Littlefield, 
Manet Board of Directors 
President, stated "On behalf 
of Manet Community Health 
Center, we wish Tom the best 
of luck m her future endeav- 
ors. We have been \ery. very 
fortunate. Tom is the epitome 
of what a Chief Executive 
Otticcr should be and we 
w ish her nothinc but the best. 
Wc vmII miss her tremen- 
douNlv. she has left Manet 



stronger." 

McGuire instituted a suc- 
cessful Chronic Di.sease Pro- 
gram and has postured 
Manet toward an electronic 
medical record systerm. 
Manet became property 
owners of the North Quincy 
site, a first for the organiza- 
tion in their 28 years. 

When asked about her 
decision to leave, McGuire 
said "It was one of the most 
difficult professional deci- 
sions that I have had to make. 
However, the chance to work 
within my home commuinity 



makes the most sense at this 
time. Manet was a second 
home to me, but I am excited 
for this new opportunity. 

The center will be under 
the interim leadership of 
Chief Financial Officer Tony 
Voislow and Chief Opera- 
tions Officer, Jane Maffie- 
Lee. they will share the du- 
ties until a search has been 
completed and a new CEO 
is named. 

Manet Community 
Health Center's mission is to 
provide assessible. quality 
healthcare for all. 





FIRE SAFETY 

by Cafrtabi Tom Ly(ME» 



Quiitty Firw Departmmt 




Use Caution With Space Heaters 



Can, Bottle Drive For Robotics 



The Quincv Public 
Schools robotics team will 
hold a bottle and can dnve 
fundraiser Saturday. Jan. 1 9. 
at Quincy High School. 



Participants are urged to 
enter through the dix>r across 
from the Y MCA next to the 
playground where a sign will 
be posted. 



pN^^ipi'iiwmiwiimiiwu.mumii.yw 



THE FUTU 
PREPARE FOR IT. 



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Personalized Financial Consulting & Estate Planning 



I was reading a recent ar- 
ticle pertaining to a couple of 
fatal fires and one statistic 
stood out; "Half of all resi- 
dential fires occur between 
December and February..." 
(N.F.PA.) 

Why. the article for one 
refers to a specific acciden- 
tal fire caused by an electric 
space heater. It refers to the 
NFPA statistic indicating that 
in 2005. space heaters caused 
.^2 percent of home heating 
fires and 73 percent of deaths 
from such fires. While there 
are a number of other reasons 
for the significant increa.se in 
house fires during these 
months, the space heater is- 
sue is worth taking another 
look at. 

Do not leave a space 
heater on during sleeping 
hours. 1 can recall a fatal 
house fire where a space 
heater was left unattended 




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while household members 
slept, and more recently, one 
in Boston, which ignited 
bedding while occupants 
slept. Electric space heaters 
should never be left on 
within a bedroom while 
occupants sleep. 

As most manufacturers 
agree, while in use, a space 
heater must have a minimum 
of a three-foot clearance 
from combustibles, bedding, 
newspapers, curtains and 
clothing. Make certain that it 
is placed upon the floor in 
such a manner to avoid tip- 
ping as well. 

Any space heater used 
should have the label of an 
independent testing lab such 
as *'UL," which conduct 
equipment safety reviews. 

Never use them near a 
sink, bathtub or water. If an 
extension cord is used, make 
certain it is not faulty or 
frayed, use cords within their 

Seek Medical 

The Council on Aging is 
seeking donations of medi- 
cal equipment that is no 
longer needed by the current 
owner but can be loaned to 
someone else. 



marked rating, and do not 
overload. 

Seventy percent of these 
fires were caused when com- 
bustible materials such as 
bedding, rubbish or furniture 
were too close to the heater, 
and another 1 5 percent were 
caused by and electrical fail- 
ure such as an overloaded 
extension cord. 

With the rising cost of 
fossil fuels, space heater use 
tends to increase. This fact 
makes proper use of space 
heaters imperative. Please 
use them safely and be mind- 
ful of all the safeguards listed 
here and the recommenda- 
tions specified on the 
manufacturer's instructions 
as well. 

Let's get through these 
winter months without an 
incident. Pay attention to the 
recommendations, pay atten- 
tion to detail and use space 
heaters safely. 

Gear To Loan 

The present highest prior- 
ity is given to bath transfer 
seats. 

Call the Council at 61 7- 
376-1506. 



ARE ALCOHOL OR DRUGS CAUSING 
PROBLEMS IN YOUR FAMILY? 

The FAMILY PROJECT may help. 

The Family Project is a study being done by 

Harvard Medical School researchers at Bay State 

Community Services in Quincy &Weymouth. The 

study offers free counseling to individuals with 

alcohol or drug problems. To qualify, you must: 

* Have a current alcohol or drug 
problem 

* Currently live with a family 
member (parent, sibling, adult child) 

* Have a family member without a 
current alcohol or drug problem 

For more information, call 617-694-2602 



FOOTTNOTES 

by Joel Chariton, D.PJL 

D^i*a«te, Aflcrkaa iMfi af PMlfttrk Sarfery 




TREATING PSORIASIS OF THE FEET 



The soles of the feet need 
to be tough but flexible. As a 
result, the soles are a common 
place for a person to get pso- 
riasis. The condition can look 
pustular, swollen, or cracked. 
People need to address the 
problem quickly because it can 
be painful and make it difficult 
to walk. Depending on the con- 
dition, a podiatrist may recom- 
mend a topical combination of 
tar, saKcytic acid, and steroids. 
He or ^ may also recom- 
mend putting medicatkm on 
the affected feet, covering the 
feet wftfi pia^ic bags, and then 
socks. Patients can try this 
\NtiMe they sleep or for a few 
houn before going to bed. If 

lopicalfrMlmantB do rwt mkkK 
onk metications may be pro- 
scribal. 

Ai9 yoy ptaguad by peoria- 
•ii «r anotwr foot oondJtion 



that makes every step a painful 
one? One of the best things 
you can do to take good care of 
your feet is to treat them to 
regular professional podiatric 
care. With all they do for you, 
your feet deserve it. We'll do all 
we can to teach you how you 
can achieve and maintain opti- 
mal foot health. State of the art 
facilities to treat all foot con- 
cerns, chrontecondittons, inju- 
res, and hereditary problems 
are available to you at QUINCY 
MEDICALCENTER. Call 781- 
966-3668. Offce hours are also 
available at 999 North Main 
St., in the Randolph Medical 
Office Building, and Milton 
Medical Building in Suite 221 . 
PS: Psoriasis affects all 
noes, women and irwn at the 
same nie, and people of aU 
sodoeconomk badignHM^k 
equ$»f. 



llMtBday.JaiiiMrylT^lOOS: Tliv'QaiAaJf 



nge.13 



Annual Membership Meeting Jan. 23 

Edward Keohane Elected 
Quincy 2000 President 



John Hancock Birthday Plunge 
To Support Interfaith Social Services 



Edward Keohane, presi- 
dent of Keohane Funeral 
Homes, has been elected 
Chairman and President of 
Quincy 2000 Collaborative 
by the Board of Directors for 
2008. 

The annual membership 
meeting will be held 
Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Con- 
stitution Room at Best West- 
em Adams Inn, 29 Hancock 
St., North Quincy. 

Mayor Thomas Koch, 
keynote speaker, will share 
his goals and objectives as he 
enters his first term in office. 

Keohane, a long-time 
member of Quincy 2000 and 
a member of its board since 
1993, succeeds Peter 
Racicott, Vice President of 
Business Development at 
Fallon Ambulance. Racicott 




EDWARD KEOHANE 

will be recognized for his 
service. 

Newly elected Directors 
are: Richard Braccia, Busi- 
ness Manager from the New 
England Regional Council of 
Carpenters Local Union 424; 
Daniel Flynn, Chairman of 
Daniel J. Flynn & Company; 
Terry Bellott-Palmieri; Vice 
President Business Develop- 



ment at Eastern Bank; and 
Frank Trainer, President of 
Commonwealth Building, 
Inc. 

Members are invited to 
bring brochures and other 
promotional materials, 
which can be displayed, on 
information sharing tables. 
The event is an opportunity 
to network and share ideas 
and resources with fellow 
members, city leaders and 
local officials. Call (617) 
847-1454 to RSVP to this 
free event. 

Membership meetings 
sponsors are: Barry & Asso- 
ciates, Best Western Adams 
Inn, Carpenters Local Union 
424, Commonwealth Build- 
ing, Inc., Eastern Bank, 
Galvin Structures, Inc., 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
Rogers Jewelry. 



The Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission will 
host its second annual John 
Hancock Birthday Plunge 
Saturday, Jan. 19 at noon at 
Mound Street Beach in 
Quincy Point. 

The event will support 
Interfaith Social Services 
which has been helping 



families in need on the South 
Shore for more than 60 
years. 

"Plungers" can help by 
soliciting sponsors. Forms 
are available by contacting 
Ward 1 Councillor Leo Kelly 
at 617-773-1534 or event 
coordinator Chickie 



Abdallah at 617-479-2142. 

Prizes will be awarded for 
the highest amount of 
pledges, and for most un- 
usual "get-ups!" 

For more information 
about Interfaith Social Ser- 
vices, visit 
www. inter fa ithsocial 
services.org. 



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ThurMlay, Janaary 17, 2t08 



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S*%iA' »*«*' 



Ringing The Bell For The Salvation Army 




MAYOR THOMAS K(K H (IrH) and former Mayor William 
Phelan. 




FORTY-EIGHT community leaders vol- 
unteered to man the Salvation Army kettle 
in front of City Hall for three cold, snowy 
days in December. They raised nearly 
$3,000 for the Salvation Army's Quincy 
Temple Corps to help needy Quincy fami- 
lies at Christmas. Overall, the Quincy 
Temple Corps raised $151,000 in the an- 
nual kettle drive. Majors Doug and Linda 
Jones, co-commanders of the Quincy 
Temple Corps, thank the community lead- 
ers and all the other volunteers who made 
this possible. Photos by Maralin Manning. 




FORMER Mayor Frank McCauley and City CoiuiciUor Michael 
McFarland. 



JOHN ()'( ONNOR. presideni and CEO Soulli Coastal Bank: 
K(tbi>rt (uiarniori. president Colonial Federal Savings Rank 
and Robert ( 'urr> . chairman Quinc> Medical Center Board of 
Directors and owner Currv Hardware stores. 




SCllOOIt OMMITTKKU OMAN Jo-Ann Bragg. Linda Stice. 
former schmtl committeewoman and Kath> McCluske>. presi- 
dent Quinc\ leen Mothers Program.. 





POLICE CHIEF Robert Crowley and Fire Chief Tbnothy 
Pettinelli. 




WARD 2 Councillor Dan Raymondi and Atty. George Burke, 
former city councillor, state representative and district attor- 
ney. 



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«E>l9w& S2S ««K>nQpenir9 iMtti •$» minimum deposit. S2S aiKrthtl^ 
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gUd t^onineppiy.lg after tt» fwsr signed' detoftW»ns*aiCMi%tompj«ii $25 



Thursday, January 17, 2008 Tl&e Qviiaoy Sisa Fage 15 



Ringing The Bell For The Salvation Army 




•^ M 



^r 








CITY COUNCILLOR John Keenan, Anthony Agnltti, chair 

QUINCY SUN Publisher Henry Bosworth and ChazyDowaliby, man Quincy Medical Center Foundation Board and owner CITY COUNCILLOR Joseph Finn and State Rep. Bruce Ayers. 
editor of The Patriot Ledger. Agnitti Insurance Agency, and Ward 6 Councillor Brian ||M»^ .. ^ C|r ; = 










4> 
1 



DONALD UVANITTE, Chairman South Central Work Force ^^^^^ ff .^ \ wmmtmmmm REV. RICHARD CANNON, pastor of St John's Church and 

Investment Board and vice president Eastern Insurance, and RICHARD BARRY, president of the Quincy Rotary Qub and Rev. WUIiam Harding, pastor of Bethany Congregational 



School Supt. Dr. Richard DeCristofaro. 



attorney, and Ward 1 Councillor Leo Kelly. 



Church. 




AMERICAN LEGION Past National Commander John (Jake) 

Comer,steteRep.RonaIdMaria„oandNorfolkCounty SherifT CTTY SOLICITOR James Timmins and IsobelBertman, mem- HEALTH COMMISSIONER Drew Scheele and School Com- 

iMarahn Manning Photos) ber South Shore YMCA and Salvation Army Boards mitteewoman Elaine Dwyer. Other Photos On Page 28 



Michael Bellotti. 




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Seating is limited. Reservations required. 
Please R.S.V.P. by calling (617) 70M414. 



Thursday, January 31' 
11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 

The Cape Codder - V'J's Grille Room 
1225 lyanough Road 
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Good News For Home Buyers And Sellers 



South Shore Real Estate . • . A Buyer's Market 



By ART FOLEY 

Broker/Chine r 
CENTURY 21 Annex Rioln 

When it comes to real es- 
tate, the home buyer is tnily 
in the "driver's seat" when it 
comes to housing purchases 
in Massachusetts. 

Inventory is high and 
prices are low. ..which 
means that working with an 
cxpenenced real estate bro- 
ker is more important than 
ever With a wide selection 
i>t houses available, in all 
kinds of configurations and 
conditions, professional as- 
sistance m the form of a 
qualified brisker can help 
["H^tential huvcrs sift through 
the confusion and find the 
hi>mc that is right for them 
•it a pnce that works. 

One i>t "lifcs lessons" for 
would-be home-buyers is 
that there will always be 
people who must sell their 
hi>me, whether it is due to re- 
Uvation. financial reasons or 
a need for more space. With 
the influx of properties on 
the market and interest rales 
at a low. now is the ideal time 
ioi first time huyers or those 
KH>king to "buy up " 

On the other hand, al- 




ART FOLEY 

though It IS a buyer's market, 
motivated sellers, too, can 
still be successful. By ag- 
gressively pricing a home 
and staying in tune with cur- 
rent market trends, the seller 
can take advantage of price 
dips to sell to educated buy- 
ers. The end result, for both 
buyer and seller is the abil- 
ity to either purchase a home 
that he or she may not have 
been able to afford a few 
years ago. 

Putting all this into a lo- 
cal context. 386 single fam- 
ily homes have been sold in 
Quincy in 2007 with an a\ - 
eraee of 109 davs on the 



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ADVERIISEMENT 



Why 50% Of Homes 

Listed For Sale Don't Sell 

The First Time And What 

to Do About It 



Quioey - If your homr has just come off the nurket and hasn't 
sokl, don 'I get disciHini^ed The reason your home did qo( 
sell may have nothing to do with your home w the market. 
In realitv. your home may have been one of the more desir- 
able properues for !»ale 

So W by Didn t Your Home Sdl? 

Lasi yeai aliuosf half of the homes h.sled for sale i^vct 
!»old at all. and nian> sullen, found that there was a tremen- 
dou.N aiiiouni u homeowner need^ to be educated on to sell 
ttMir home Itw top dollar in the shortest tmie period. 

Don t risk making the wrong choices and losmg bod) time 
and mone\ on your investment Befwe you hire a realtor, 
know the nghi quesuoos to ask to save you tune Mid nKXiey. 

Industry experts have (»vf>«ed a free special r^KXt called 
"Horn loSeUm House Am Di^i SdT" wfaidi educates you 
uo dir is.suc^ involved 

lb hew ■ brief reoarded BMMitr ^Mrt bwv t» I 

BMMU. YwcMctf Myltee.24bo«na4v.7d^« 



market... more than double 
over the past five years. The 
average sale price has risen 
17 percent since 2002, but 
we are currently experienc- 
ing a peak in sale price de- 
creases. Sale prices in this 
area have declined seven per- 
cent since 200.5. 

Unlike other parts of the 
state, the South 

Shore... Quincy in 

particular... is at a di.stinct 
advantage when it comes to 
real estate. Quincy 's proxim- 
ity to Boston and easy access 
to public transportation 
makes the area attractive to 
buyers. And with gas prices 
on the ri.se and those inevi- 
table snowy New England 
winters, Quincy 's numerous 
public transportation points 
provide the accessibility of 
city living combined with the 
comfort of the suburbs. 

As with other industries, 
though, change does not hap- 
pen over night. The South 
Shore might seem to be far- 
ing well during this eco- 
nomic downturn, but it will 
still be another year or two 
before we see any significant 
impro\ ement. The real estate 
market has a major impact on 
the economy, and the Fed is 
currently working to lower 
interest rates to a reasonable 
level which should help 
boost the market and in turn 
the local and national 
economy. With a drop in in- 
terest rates, the hope is that 
the inventory will begin to 
shrink once again and the 
industry will level out. Buy- 
ers should do their home- 
work regarding mortgage 
rates and the properties on 
the market... sellers should 



QUINCY - SINGLE FAMILY HOMES 



YEAR 


# OF SALES 


AVERAGE 
DAYS ON 
MARKET 


AVERAGE 
SALES PRICE 


2002 


398 


52 


$315^54 


2003 


43t 


62 


$352,796 


2004 


463 


S9 


$378,318 


2005 
2006 


4Si 


74 


$398,970 


406 


98 


$381,733 


2007 


386 


109 


$371,013 



price their homes accord- 
ingly. 

The end result will be, in 
spite of the continuation of 
the "buyer's market" phe- 
nomenon, good news for 
South Shore home owners 
and would-be 

buyers . . . affordable homes 
for would-be buyers, reason- 
able sales prices for those 



looking to sell their home. 

Century 2 1 Aimex Realty. 
Inc., has provided compre- 
hensive real estate services to 
the South Shore since 1978. 
Century 21 Annex Realtyh 
has offices in Quincy and 
Hanover, and a staff of more 
than 50 professional Real- 
tors. 

For more information 



about CENTURY 21 Annex 
Realty, Inc., or itsservices, 
including sales, rentals, ap- 
praisals, property manage- 
ment, continuing education 
programs and free notary ser- 
vices, call the Quincy office 
at 617-472-4330 or toll-free 
800-345-4614, the Hanover 
office at 781-829-4210 or 
toll-free 800-207-8647. 



Neighborhood Housing Services 
First-Time Homebuyer Workshop 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of the South Shore, 
422 Washington St., Quincy, 
announces Citizens Bank 
will sponsor a first-time 
homebuyer workshop Mon- 
day, Feb. 1 1 from 5 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday, Feb. 13 
from 5 to 9 p.m. 

The workshop will be 
held at the Citizens Bank 



REALTY 7 

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617-472-7700 



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branch, 1200 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

Attendance at both ses- 
sions is necessary to receive 
a homebuying certificate. 

There is a $15 fee per per- 
son. 

Open to all, regardless of 
income, seminars are educa- 
tional and recommended for 
all potential first-time 
homebuyers. 

Participants will also have 
the opportunity to speak with 
a lender to discuss mortgage 



Annex Recrity^ Inc. 



QUINCY 




^N^N^N. 



stamosandstamosrealtors 



.com 



Theresa Repoff 
617-821-5298 

rh^TesaRqx)ff@aol.com 

Your Personal Realtor 
for Buying or Selling 

/ C(m TeU You 

What Your Home 

isWorOt 



options. 

Also covered at the work- 
shop will be the legal aspects 
of buying a home, impor- 
tance of home and lead in- 
spections and other informa- 
tion. 

The workshop is a pre- 
requisite for first-time 
homebuyer mortgage and 
grant programs, and is open 
to all Massachusetts resi- 
dents, regardless of income. 

To register or for more 
information, call (617) 770- 
2227. 

Tenants' 

Rights 

Workshop 

Quincy Community Ac- 
tion Programs, Inc. (QCAP) 
will offer a workshop on 
Tenants' Rights and Respon- 
sibilities Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 
5:30 p.m. at QCAP, 1509 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

Topics will include types 
of leases, landlord responsi- 
biUties, tenant responsibili- 
ties, the court process and 
more. 

To RSVP, call Nancy 
Sullivan, Housing Program 
director, at 617-479-8181 
ext. 166. 



VfKitv.imm^lM^ Slnt » H<m <g^fiH> rravi? 




Hints For Homeowners 



Home-Improvement Expert Offers Tips 
On Uncovering Potential Problems 



(NAPS) - Home repairs 
and maintenance are 
inevitable, but with careful 
planning and the proper tools, 
perhaps the next problem can 
be detected and prevented 
before it happens. 

"The most common 
complaint from homeowners 
is that they didn't know they 
had a problem until it was too 
late," says Ron Hazelton, host 
of the nationally syndicated 
television series "Ron 
Hazelton's House Calls." 
"It's what's hidden behind 
things, obstructed from view 
or in a had-to-reach place, 
that can cause potential 
problems." 

Get the Gunk Out 

Dirty, clogged gutters can 
cause problems, including 
flooded basements and 
damage to the home's 
foundation, exterior trim and 
landscaping. To clean, 
simply remove all debris with 
a gutter scoop or small garden 
trowel so water can drain 
properly. Plan to clean gutters 
at least twice a year, more 
often if the roof is directly 
beneath trees. Consider 
installing gutter guards to 
prevent additional debris 
from building up. 

Don ' t forget to inspect one 
of the most used appliances 
in the home: the clothes dryer. 
"The most important 
maintenance for any dryer is 
a clear exhaust," says 
Hazelton. Many dryer 
failures and fires usually 
result from an improperly 
maintained vent system.. 
Disconnect, clean and inspect 
the dryer duct once a month. 
This will dry clothing faster, 
increase life span and, most 
importantly, reduce fire 
hazard. 

Keep Out the Cold 

Keep cold air out of your 
house by sealing gaps around 



doors and windows with 
weather stripping. Also, 
inspect the exterior of the 
house for cracks and use 
caulk to seal. Proper 
installation is crucial when it 
comes to keeping a house 
warm throughout the winter 
and cool in the summer. To 
find out how much 
installation is recommended, 
visit the U.S. Department of 
Energy's Web site at 
www.energ y.gov. 

But how can you tell if 
your walls, ceiling and attic 
already contain enough 
insulation? The new RIDGID 
SeeSnake micro inspection 
camera allows you to get 
behind walls or above 
ceilings to see for yourself. 



The SeeSnake micro features 
a minicamera and bright LED 
lights on the end of a 3-foot 
flexible cable that allows 
users to see around comers 
and behind walls, and inside 
ducts, attics and crawl spaces. 
If fits into almost any space 
and projects an image of the 
hidden area onto a handle- 
mounted LCD screen. 

"Insulation is one of the 
easiest, most cost-effective 
ways of increasing your 
home's energy efficiency, as 
well as saving money on 
energy bills," Hazelton said. 
"Plus, there's no need to 
remove large sections of 
drywall or create gaping 
holes in your ceiling just to 
get a peak at your insulation 



if you have the proper tools." 
Fire It Up 

Remember to replace your 
furnace filter regularly and 
have a professional service 
your heating systems once a 
year. Check registers, vents 
and ducts to make sure there 
is little or no debris. "With a 
tool like the SeeSnake micro, 
you can get a peek at these 
tight spots, and even remove 
a small piece of debris with 
their Hook Tip that can pick 
up, tug or pull small objects," 
says Hazelton. "A clean 
system helps heating and 
cooling equipment run more 
efficiently, conserving 
energy and saving money for 
homeowners." 



Free Homebuyers Workshop From Conway 



A team of experts from 
Mass Housing, Birchwood 
Credit Services, Jack 
Conway Real Estate and 
Conway Financial Services 
will present a free informa- 
tional event Tuesday, Jan. 22 
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the 
Phillips Old Colony House at 
780 Morrissey Blvd. in 
Dorchester. 

They will explain what 
you need to know about buy- 
ing real estate in todays mar- 
ket. 

Questions to be answered 
are: 

• Why is now the time to 



buy real estate? 

• What is the value of 
owning real estate? 

• How to buy real estate 
in today's market? 

• What do credit scores 
mean and how do they affect 
purchasing power? 

Guest speakers will in- 
clude Maureen Moriarty of 
MHFA, Larry Avery of 
Birchwood Credit Services 
and Denis Lilla, the vice- 
president of sales at Jack 
Conway. 

Jack Conway Real Estate 
will also be showcasing its 
most affordable properties. 



all of which include sales 
concessions you can use to 
pay closing costs, eliminate 
mortgage insurance or lower 
your interest rate. 

The event is for all real 
estate buyers, including po- 
tential first-time 
homebuyers. 

Pre-registration is recom- 
mended. Register before Jan. 
1 8 and receive a free credit 
report along with a credit 
analysis report designed to 
help you increase you credit 
scores (a $20 value). 

To register call Nancy 
Van Lenten at 78 1 -26 1 -5 376. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

To Our Top Agents for December 2007 



Realty Pros ^^ 




Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Coll Tom McForiond 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 

61 7-328-3200 




OLIVIA KING 

Tops in Listings 



RENEE 
CZAJKOWSKI 

Tops in Sales 



.Jack 



Conway 



REALTOR' 

JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC. 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

www.JackConway.com 

The Largest Independently Owned 
Real Estate Company in Massachusetts 



MA. ML 01043 



MA. M.B. 01174 



HANOVE 

1 )?C AViST'i'igron "^ 

781-8294210 



THIS 





TDvlMEK 

By Samantha Mazzotta 



Bulging Floor? 
Check Joists 

Q, I saw your column a 
• while back about 
sagging floorboards. Well, 
I have the opposite prob- 
lem. A couple of spots 
underneath my living- 
room carpet feel like there 
is a "hump" there. When I 
pulled back a section of 
carpet to check if there was 
something underneath, I 
saw nothing. The under- 
layment looked fine. But 
those areas feel out of line 
with the rest of the floor. 
Do you have any idea what 
this could be? — Joseph T., 
Ogden, Utah 

A, If you've ruled out 
• problems with the 
carpet and subflooring, the 
joists underneath may be a 
possibility. These are large 
boards that support the sub- 
floor, which can be accessed 
from the basement or crawl- 
space. Like all wooden 
structures, homes contract 
and expand, and settle over 
time, and this affects the 
structure in different ways. 

In this case, it's possible 
that a Joist has warped and is 
arching or bulging upward, 
creating that odd hump m 
the floor (that there are two 
spots, suggests two warped 
joists). This can be corrected 
by using the weight of the 
house to straighten the 
board. 

Slide a level along the car- 
pet to find the highest point 



of the hump. Mark it, then 
measure to that point from 
some element that extends to 
the area below (such as a 
heating duct or pipe). This 
measurement will help you 
mark the correct spot on the 
joist below where the high 
point of the bulge is cen- 
tered. 

Once you've found your 
spot, take a recipyrocating 
saw and make a straight cut 
at that spot, starting at the 
bottom edge of the joist and 
going to just 3/4ths of the 
depth of the joist (do not cut 
all the way through the 
joist). 

Leave the joist that way for 
a few weeks, checking the 
floor occasionally with a 
level. Don't place excessive 
weight on that spot. Let the 
joist settle naturally. Once 
the spot is flush with the rest 
of the floor, go back down to 
the joist. Reinforce it by 
nailing a board of the same 
width to the joist (alongside, 
not underneath). The rein- 
forcing board should be at 
least 6 feet long and secured 
with 16d nails in pairs, stag- 
gered a foot af)art. Drive 
three nails on either side of 
the cut. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homegu- 
ru2000@hotmail.com, or 
write This Is a Hammer, do 
King Features Weekly Ser- 
vice, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 



C 2008 King Fearures Synd.. Inc. 



Room to 
Grow 



by Mark & Maria 



Our CENTURY 21 
Annex Realty agent 
Theresa helped us tind 
our tirst tiome years 
ago. We had such a 
great experience that we 
called her again when 
we wanted to move into 
a bigger house. She 
only showed us houses 
that met our criteria. We 
found our new home 
after looking at jyst three 
housts. W« couldn't 



lUINC 

" 40!*©cite9 

617-472-4330 




PageM* 



17, 



,1 



QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 



OIJINCY POLICE STATISTICS: Jml 4 - Jml 10 

TffUl Calls for Se rv ice: 1,246 

Total Arrests: 38 

Total Sltflcn Motor Vehicles: 4 
FRIDAY, JAN. 4 

LARCENY, 6:20 a.iii., 71 Crow St. Possible break. Items 
missing from house. 

LARCENY, 8:09 a.in., 826 Willard St Overnight 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 9:33 a.in.. Sovereign Bank, 20 
Beale St. White male, }f< years old. 5" 10". black scarf, light 
hat. medium build, fled on f(H>t Beale to Hancock, party passed 
a note. Boston Red Sox hat. workman's style jacket, Sox can be 
described as two white Sox's on the front. 

LARCENY, 10:59 a.m., 110 McCirath Highway A check 
was stolen from residence m November. Attempts were made 
to cash it but were unsuccessful. 

BREAMNC. AND ENTERINC./FAST, 2:17 p.m., 138 
East Elm Ave. Dwelling. Jewelry known missing. Neighbor 
saw suspicious white male 30-35 years old, 5*8" - 5' 10". me- 
dium build, long black hair, facial hair, wearing red sweatpants 
and sneakers, around 2 p.m. lurking between #130 and #138 
Ea.st Elm Ave. 

LARCENY. 5:06 p.m., YMCA, 79 Coddington St, Past 
Jewelry stolen in May of 2(X)7. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 5:11 p.m., AH Auto Repair, 
1284 Furnace Brook Parkway. Window broken. 

ARMED ROBBERY, 7:01 p.m.. Furnace Brook Gas Va- 
riety. 507 Furnace Brook Parkway. Needle. Possible male 
wearing a mask, all m black. 5' 7". 190 lbs. Video surveillance 
show s suspect is white male. 1 8-25 years. 5' 10", 200 lbs, wear- 
mg dark colored waist length jacket, light colored white or gray 
hiHxlcd sweatshirt under the jacket with the hotxl covering his 
head, blue jeans and sneakers. Black mask covering his face 
except his eyes and possibl) wearing gloves, 

KKKAKlNi; AND ENTERIN(;/PAST. 9:06 p.m.. 
NNaterVNorks. 333 \iclory Kd. Business Interior appears to 
ha\ c been vandalized, unknim n if anything is missing. 

LARCENY. 9:20 p.m.. Wal-Mart, 301 Falls Blvd. Purse 
Asian female stole purse and left in suspect motor vehicle - 
1W8 black TovotaAvalon. 

SATI RDAY.JAN.5 

> ANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:21 a.m., 12 Brook Rd. Past 
Black Mercedes. 2008 mtxlel C300. was hit and damaged. Hu- 
man feces thrown all over vehicle. 

NANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:57 a.m., Hancock Park- 
ing Area, 50 Revere Rd. Past TVo motor vehicles broken into. 
Dn\er"s window smashed, no enirv Bnck used found at scene. 

\ANDALISM/PROPERT^, 7:47 a.m., Adams Inn, 29 
Hancock St. White D(xige Grand Caravan broken into over 
night Vehicle was never entered. 

\ ANDALISM/PROPERT\ . 8:29 a.m.. 94 Newbury Ave. 
Callers Mercedes Nothing taken nothing disturbed. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY , 9:21 a.m.. South Shore Mo- 
tor Sports. 92 Franklin St. Holes in w mdow 

LARCENY . 12:06 pjn., Wal-Mart. 301 Falls Blvd. Money 
Employee stole mone\ from register Would like party arrested. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1:39 p.m., 39 
SonoDM Rd. Dwelling. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1:56 p.m., 69 
Copley St Dwelling. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 2:27 pan., 
30 Lansdowne St Dwelling. Entrance never gained. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:31 pjn., 54 ScammeU St 
Fence. Two while males, one with a black hoodie and a skate- 
board. Gone on arrival 

LARCENY, 8 pjn., Dunkin Donuts, 114 WhitweU St 
Holding one See security main lobby holding person. 

LARCENY, 8:20 pjn., 3 Cottace Ave. Past. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:59 pjn., 58 
Copeland St Force 

LARCENY, 9:05 pjn., Kentucky Fried Cluckeii, 707 
Hancock St Past 

SlfflPAY,JAN.» 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY. 7:57 ajit, 75 Presidential 

Dr. To motor vehicle. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/FAST, 8:38 a.m., 30 
Copduid St DwelUng 

LARCENY. 9:19 ajn„ IHOP. 119 Parkii^way. Pun* Cus- 
tom«^ diinks the employee stole her purse. 

LARCENY. 8:38 pjn.. Quincy Medical Center, 114 
WUtwctt St Of purse. Works as security at QMC. Purse con- 
taining credit cards, license, etc. taken. 

MONDAY. JAJS. 7 

LARCENY, 7:13 bml, McGinn's Service StatioB, (27 
Newport Ave. Past. Super Petroleum indicates customer fled 
w itboui paying $50 worth of gas. Matter to be resolved. 

LARCENY, U:4t ajiL, Slap * Shop SupcniMfcct, 495 
Smitbam Artery. Purse. Female has Alzheimer's and can't re- 
mranber where her purse is. 

BKEAKING AND ENTERINGM>KOGUSS, 12:S6 1 
U« Q«iK7 Skore Dr. Dwelling White male wemm 
jacket and jeans fled m Toyota Camry. Back door was kicked 
in. puty fied out the front door. Possibly 35 ^ws <^ loctted 
appnaioHlBly 400 East Squantum St. Su^»cs chaffed with two 
vcouHs vkdi^ing prolBctive order, larcoiy oi colroiied wb- 
stmx, mlicioiM dara^e over, and opertting after nHpeanott. 
Abo dm^ with laroray over. 

VANDALiSM/PRQPEKTY, 2:55 bjb., 461 AiMH St 



Tires. Front passenger tire slashed. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 283 Newport Ave. 

Dwelling. 

LARCENY, 4:05 p.m., 14 Curtis Ave. Past. Several items 
taken from his house. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:18 p.m., 401 
Palmer St. Dwelling. Nothing taken. Suspect 5' 8". dark hooded 
sweatshirt covering face and jeans fled scene, unknown race or 
sex. 

LARCENY, 5:11 p.m., 49 Botolph St Wallet Female wal- 
let; unknown exactly where wallet was stolen from. 

LARCENY, 7:40 p.m., North Quincy High School gym, 
318 Hancock St Cell phone. $5(X) cell phone taken. 
TUESDAY. IAN. 8 
LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 12:01 a.m.. Billings Rd. 
and Eelton St. In the last 20 minutes, keys were in motor ve- 
hicle. Motor vehicle involved in hit and run at 131 Fenno St. 
10:34 p.m. 2003 Ford pick-up. color gray. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:16 a.m., 
Wendy's Restaurant, 195 Newport Ave. Business. Entrance 
gained, safe entered, deposits taken, alarmed received from ADT 
at 2:56 a.m. Appeared secured. Video surveillance shows two 
white males entered the building around 2:50 a.m. via the rear 
door which they locked behind them. Safe forced open with 
blunt object suspect can be seen swinging, cash taken. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VTHICLE, 9:30 ajn., 43 Newcomh 
St Stolen vehicle - 2008 Ford Model Escape, color black - last 
seen in driveway at 11:30 p.m. last night, owner says wallet 
containing key to car inside motor vehicle door unlocked. Bos- 
ton PD has no record to tow. 

LARCENY, 11:44 a.m.. Bank of America, 440 Hancock 
St Past. Stolen checks cashed at Bank of America in Quincy 
Center. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:01 p.m.. Pick of the Lit- 
ter. 393 Hancock St Window smashed by unknown vandal. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:56 pjn., 156 East Ebn Ave. 
Spray paint. Front wall of house spray-painted, happened some- 
time in the past several weeks. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY. 4:28 p.m., Quincy Six Dis- 
count Liquor. 603 Washington St Graffiti. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:18 p.m., Faxon Commons, 
1027 Southern Artery. Past. Motor vehicle was hit with paint 
ball. Went to car wash, not all came off. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:31 p.m., 78 
Doane St Dwelling. Youths ran. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:28 p.m., 1397 Furnace 
Brook Parkway. Window broken. Neighbor just smashed win- 
dow. Arrest for vandalizing property, misleading police ofificer 
and resisting arrest. 

WEDNESDAY. IAN. 9 
ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:23 a.m., S6, 1550 
Hancock St Fight. Tall white male punched female and knocked 
her to ground. 

LARCENY7MOTOR VEHICLE, 8:24 a.m., 455 Sea St 
2004 Nissan Sentra, color brown, taken overnight. No record 
of tow. Owner called back saying car was simply misplaced 
and he remembered where he had parked it. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:44 ajn., RocUand lyust, 
301 Quincy Ave. Window. Appears to have been shot at. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 10:38 a.m., Quincy High 
School East 107 Woodward Ave. Past incident. 

LARCENY, 3:16 pjn., Thomas Crane Public Library, 
381 Hancock St Candy. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:52 p.m., 26 
Yardarm Rd. Ap)artment. 

THURSDAY. JAN. 10 
BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 7:44 ajn., 
47 Arthur St Residence. Attempt took place around 2 a.m. 
Caller saw white male, 25-30 years old, wearing hoodie trying 
to get into her ground flocw apartment. She turned on the light 
and be fled. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:12 pjn., 14 
CUB St. Dwelling. Weckiing band and engagement ring taken. 
BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1:24 pjn., 136 
Quincy Shore Dr. £>welling. 

LARCENY, 1:40 pjn., 1 Sea St Past. Someone stole his 
checks and used in Quincy. Bank to handle and notified. 

LARCENY, 2:29 pjn., 129 Winthrop Ave. HP placard sto- 
len sometime after January. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 5:51 pjn., 34 Figure- 
head Ln. A friend hasn't returned car since a few days ago. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:15 pjn., 8A 
Packards Ln. Dwelling. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 11:02 pjn., 10 
Edfewood CIr. Dwelling. Possible break, boot print found on 
bed. 

ID 
If you have infonn^kw (w the ihove crimes, or any crime, 
pleaK call die Qirincy Police Detective Borean at 617-745- 
S7M. If you wish to retort suspicious drug activity, call the 
Dnt Hot-Line at 617-32M527. You will not be required to 
idratify yourself, but it couki help. If you wish to make an ap- 
pointment to view the lifMii'tf Sex Offenders book, call 
Dctodivc Oiidy WwUk al ^7-745-5751. 

If you wish lo contact the Otee l*rtv«ntien Oflleer for 
t^K or cxMMMali. my dfaect line is 617-745-5719. My e-nuul 
address it dBiMkNi#eiqpHK^jaa.ii»-LL Ikm Minum 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Monday, Jan. 7, at approximately 12:40 P.M., Officers' 
Daniel Francis, Matt Tobin and David Levine were dis- 
patched to the 100 block of Quincy Shore Drive for a 
"Breaking and Entering in progress." 

While en route to the location, Quincy Police 
Communications notified 
the responding units that 
the caller/victim reported that 
the suspect fled his residence 
in a brown Toyota Camry 
northbound on Quincy 
Shore Drive. 

As units were checking the 
area. Sergeant Steven Igo no- 
tified communications that he 
had located the suspect 
vehicle behind 440 East 
Squantum Street 
(The Moorings apartment 
complex), which is within a 
mile of the crime scene. 

Sergeant Igo informed communications that a lone white 
male occupied the vehicle. The Officers responded 
to assist Sergeant Igo, who had the suspect handcufled when 
they arrived. During a pat-frisk of the suspect conducted 
by Sergeant James McNeil, numerous pieces of 
jewelry, collective coins, collective paper currency and 
prescription medication were retrieved from the 
suspect's pockets. 

While Sergeant McNeil was assisting Sergeant Igo, Of- 
ficer Tobin began an inventory search of the suspect's 
vehicle and found a metal pry-bar on the front passenger 
seat. Additional pieces of jewelry were recovered firom in- 
side the vehicle, along with a black shoulder bag that 
contained a slotted screwdriver and latex style mbber gloves. 
While assisting Officer Tobin with the search of the 
vehicle. Officer Francis recovered a hypodermic syringe and 
a clear plastic comer bag containing a brown powder residue. 

Detective Paul Pieper transported the victim/caller to the 
suspect's location for the purposes of a show-up identiflca- 
tion. The victim positively identified the suspect as 
the individual who had broken into his home. 

Officer Francis then retumed to the crime scene, where 
he and Detective William Monteith interviewed the victim, 
who stated that he had stopped home during his lunch 
break to walk his dog. He said that when he entered his 
apartment via the rear door, he immediately discovered wood 
shards on the hallway floor. He continued into his 
apartment and he observed his wife's jewelry to be 
scattered across their bed and his computer moved from an- 
other room. 

The victim yelled out "hello" and then heard sounds 
consistent with someone being in the living room. The vic- 
tim said he then observed a white male peer from around 
the wall separating the living room from the dining room. 
The suspect then fled on foot out the front door and the vic- 
tim gave chase. The suspect jumped into a brown 
Toyota Camry and drove off. 

The victim immediately called 91 1 to report the break and 
give out the license plate of the getaway car, which was in- 
strumental in apprehending the suspect. Detective 
Monteith photographed the apartment and processed items 
for fingerprint evidence. The doorjamb had tool marks 
consistent with a pry-bar being used to gain access and the 
door lock n^chanism was on the hallway floor. 

After returning to the station, it was discovered that the 
suspect's driver license was suspended. It was soon 
discovered that the suspect has an active abuse 
prevention order issued against him. An abuse prevention 
order, which has many options, was obtained by his mother 
with the following stipulations: "^ 1.) No abuse*2.) 
No contact, and stay away 100 yards*3.) Stay away from 
the plaintiff's residence* 10.) Allowed to pick-up 
personal belongings* 12.) Surrender all firearms 

This is significant because the suspect was apprehended 
in the parking lot of his mother's home (within 100 yards). 
He also used the telephone at the station to call his mother, 
which was also a violation. (This was prior to Officers learn- 
ing about the outstanding order) The suspect, a 46 year-old 
Quincy resi(tent, was charged with B&E to a Building during 
the Daytime for the Commission of a Felony, Possession of 
Burglarious Tools to wit pry-bar, screwdriver, flashlight, 
latex gloves. Operating a Motor Vehicle after 
Suspension (Subsequent offense). Violation of Abuse 
Prevention Act, being within 100 yards, and at the residence 
of his mother. Violation of Abuse Prevention Act, calling 
his mother at booking. Larceny of Drugs, 
Malicious Destruction of Property over $250 to wit 
apartment dtxx and Larceny over $250 (jewelry). 

Nice Work! 

G 

RECENT BREAKS: Since December 1 , 2007, there have 
been a total of 44 break-ins throughout the city. Vac major- 
ity have been to homes and are discovered after the resident 
gets home from wtxk ot school. This means that most of tte 
bfeak-ins we occurring during the day when no one is home. 
The m^hod of entry varies, but one commonality is that tte 
access point is either in the rear of the house ot a side area 
(Cont'd On Page 25) 



Th«nNfiiyrjamMryl7,'20e»' 'Tlur^viniSrlVwifvPati^ t9< 



Sports 



Fundraiser Jan. 25 At Sons Of Italy 

Quincy To Host 2008 
Babe Ruth World Series 



Mayor Thomas P. Koch 
and the Babe Ruth World 
Series Committee are proud 
to amiounce that the City of 
Quincy will once again host 
the 14-year old Babe Ruth 
World Scries at Adams Field 
during the month of August. 

The contract signing will 
take place at the Jan. 25 
World Series fundraiser to 
be held at the Quincy Sons of 
Italy. Mayor Koch, National 
Vice President Robert 
Faherty, and Quincy World 
Series President Dick 
Lombardi will officially 
usher in the 2008 series. 

For the third time in the 
past six years, Quincy will 
serve as host for this exciting 
event. In 2003 and 2005, the 



World Series drew close to 
60,000 visitors to Quincy. 
The all-volunteer Quincy 
Babe Ruth World Series 
Committee is now hard at 
work preparing to make the 
2008 series bigger and better. 

There are significant costs 
associated with bringing the 
World Series to Quincy, 
approximately $250,000. 
The Series Committee covers 
all costs associated with the 
event including fees, 
concessions, security, 
overtime, etc. Therefore, 
fundraising is a critical 
component of committee 
planning. 

A fundraiser will be held 
on Friday evening, Jan. 25 



from 7 p.m. until midnight at 
the Quincy Sons of Italy. The 
cost is $15 per ticket, two 
tickets for $25, and includes 
a pasta supper (7:30-9 p.m.). 
The fundraiser will feature 
entertainment by DJ Mark 
McGillicuddy, and a silent 
auction will also take place. 

This event offers all an 
opportunity to support the 
efforts of the World Series 
Committee and enjoy an 
inexpensive night out. 

Fir ticket information, 
contact Dick Lombardi (617- 
479-5724), John Norton 
(6 1 7-472-8894), Beth Luizzo 
(617-328-1416), Patti 
Steams (617-472-0951), or 
Joe Brill (617-733-8026). 



Seniors Rally Presidents 
Past Dennis-Yarmouth 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

Senior leadership helped 
the Quincy girls' basketball 
team end last week with a 1- 
1 record. 

The Presidents rallied 
from nine points down in the 
final five and a half minutes 
of play last Thursday night 
against Dennis-Yarmouth 
High School and came away 
with 57-5 1 league win. 

Quincy (5-4 overall, 3-2 
in the ACL), which lost to 
defending ACL North co- 
champion Whitman-Hanson 
HS 62-22 last Tuesday (Jan. 
8), received 27 points from 
senior captain/guard Meagan 
Tobin, including two huge 
three-pointers during the 
final five and half minutes of 
play to grab an important 
league win. 

"This was an important 
and big win for us," said 
Quincy head coach Jeff 
Bretsch. "We are going to 
have to fight each game to 
give us the chance to make 
the post season tournament, 
and coming off the game 
against Whitman- Hanson we 
really needed a victory. At 
this point in the season, we 
can not afford to lose too 
many games and being 5-4 
instead of 4-5 is a big plus." 

The Presidents came out 
of the gates against D- Y firing 
on all cylinders, taking an 
early nine-point first half 
lead. Using their patented full 
court pressure defense, 
Quincy forced D-Y into a 
number of first-half 
turnovers, which they 
converted to easy buckets 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



early. 

"We came out and built a 
nine-point lead to start the 
game," Bretsch added. "It 
was a great way to open the 
game." 

Senior center Kerri Ryan 
( 1 6 points, 8 rebounds) made 
her presence felt early and 
often coming off the bench. 
Ryan gave Quincy an inside 
presence that has been 
missing for most of the 
season, and her play opened 
up shooting lanes for Tobin 
and senior captain/guard 
Marybeth Torpey. 

"Kerri came off the bench 
and contributed huge," said 
Bretsch. "She has been on 
the varsity team for a couple 
of seasons, but she played a 
huge role in this win. Her 
play down low opened up the 
court and allowed us to take 
the early lead." 

The Presidents would 
hold the lead heading into 
the halftime break despite 
allowing D-Y to cut the nine- 
point deficit to just one at the 
end of the first half. 

"D-Y went on a late 
scoring run heading into the 
half, but we still held a lead 
and were in good shape 
entering the second-half of 
play, but our play in the third 
quarter was not our best." 

The Presidents scored just 
seven points in the third 
quarter, turning their nine- 
point lead into a nine-point 
deficit, and forcing them to 
come-froni-behind in the 



fourth quarter. 

"They really beat us up in 
that third quarter, allowing 
us to score just those seven 
points," said Bretsch. "We 
needed to get back to what 
we do best (pressure defense ) 
in the final quarter, and when 
we finally did that, we got 
back on track." 

Torpey (eight points, eight 
rebounds) led the way for 
Quincy early in the final 
quarter, and it was her 
suffocating defense that got 
the winning rally going. She 
finished the fourth quarter 
by scoring all eight of her 
points and getting five of her 
steals. 

"When we went back to 
pressure defense, Marybeth 
forced several turnovers that 
we turned into easy scores," 
Bretsch said. "She dominated 
on defense." 

But it was Tobin who 
finally put the Dolphins 
away. Her two three-pomters 
(Torpey also buried a three- 
pointer during the comeback ) 
in the final minutes of play 
put the game out of reach 

"Meagan is our best 
shooter and when she is on. 
she can really hurt opposing 
teams," Bretsch added. "The 
play of Tobin, Torpey and 
Ryan propelled us to 
victory." 

Quincy played Sandwich 
HS on Tuesday night (Jan. 
1 5 ) and the team is scheduled 
to play against Falmouth HS 
Friday night on the Cape. 




RICHIE SULLIVAN, President of the North Quincy High School Class of 1948, recenUy com- 
peted in the Senior Softball Tournament in Phoenix, AZ where he met a classmate, Dottie Flint, 
whom he had not seen for 59 years! Here they are pictured renewing old acquaintance. Richie, 
a Chatham resident and retired Dean of Cape Cod Community College, is helping to plan the 
60th Reunion of his North Quincy Class, to be held in September. Dottie, a Phoenix resident for 
the past several years, has promised to consider making the trip. 

Youth Basketball Highlights 



The following are 
highlights from Quincy 
Youth Basketball games for 
Jan. 6. 

Boys, Grades 6-8 

Michael Ruan scored 16 
points to lead Colonial 
Federal ( 1 - 1 ) to a 54-20 win 
over First Glass Construction 
(0-2). Liam Fitzmaurize ( 14 
pts.), Ian Dunphy (12 pts.), 
Shane Ceurvals (six pts.) and 
Anthony Gustin (four pts.) 
all scored for Federal. 

Tim McDonald scored six 
points for First Glass and 
Matthew Pham and Steve 
Quinn each scored four 
points. 

Atty. George Burke (2-0) 
prevailed over Rep. Bruce 
Ayers (0-2) 48-40. Seamus 
Pound led all scorers with 1 8 
points. Alex Bottari scored 
16 points, DJ Feliciano 
scored ten points and John 
Yacano added four. 

For Rep. Ayers, John 
Jones and Keenan Daniels 
each scored 1 2 points, while 
Dan Guarente scored eight, 
and Jack Kozlowski scored 
six points. 

Christ Church Quincy ( 1- 
1 ) fell to Roche Brothers 53- 
38 despite Leo Cleary scoring 
20 points, including three 3- 
pointers and all three of his 
free throws. Brendan Moreira 
(eight pts.), Padraig Geaney 
(six) and Chris Ham (four) 
also scored for Chnst Church. 

For Roche Brothers, Dan 
Mongo scored 20 points, 
Raymond Wong added 16 
and Kvle Richardson and Joe 



Valentin scored six points 
apiece. 

Girls, Grade 6-8 

Therese Triglia scored a 
game high 1 5 points as JET 
Realty (2-0) beat Quincy 
Credit Union (0-1) 35-29. 
Also scoring for JET Realty 
were Nathalie Pham (10 
points), Presley McLaughlin 
(8 pts.) and Kathleen Jarre 11 
(2 pts.). 

For Quincy Credit Union, 
scorers included Rebecca 
Hansen (10 pts.), Abrar 
Ahmed (7 pts.), Tristine 
Thong (6 pts.), Alisiea Bray 
(4 pts.) and Shannon Leary 
(2 pts.). 

Girls, Grades 3-5 

Powered by Kayleen 
Lenihan's 24 points, Quincy 
Firefighters Local 792 (2-0) 
beat Torre Dei Passeri Social 
Club (0-1)41-6. Also sconng 
for Quincy Firefighters were 
Alison Coleman (8 pts. ) and 
Holly George (6 pts.) 

Haley DiCristofaro scored 
all six points for Torre Dei 
Passeri with Laura 
Brunbridge, Brianna Quinn, 
Gianna Thomas, Nadine 
Zahreddine, Julia Larkin and 
Emma Smith all playing well. 

Boys, Grades 3-5 

In a close game Feenan 
Financial edged out Flavin 
and Flavin 19-16 with Alex 
Linsky sconng nine points 
and Aldan Smyth and Evan 
Fienberg adding four points 
each. 

For Flavin and Flavin, 
Matthew Gerakis was the 
game high scorer with 10 



points. Nicholas added four 
points. 

Cristiani Chiropractic 
beat Coughlin Club 27-22. 
Liam Rodgers and Kevin 
Fitzgerald played great 
defense and Zack Dangora 
scored 12 points for the 
Coughlin Club. 

Leading the way for 
Cristiani Chiropractic was 
Darius Norris who scored a 
game high 21 points. 

The Morrissey Senators 
remained undefeated with 
their 21-9 win over Covais 
Law Office. Stephen Scolaro 
scored 1 1 points and James 
MacDonald and Cole Bishop 
each scored four points for 
the winners. 

Dale White ' s seven points 
led Covais Law and Brian 
Collins and Brendan Collins 
both played great defense. 

The Bank of Canton beat 
Torre Dei Passeri Social Club 
40-34 behind 30 points from 
Leon Buckley. Also playing 
well were Alex Bui, Andrew 
Mariano and Luke Carlyle. 

The high scorers for Torre 
Dei Passeri were Joe Yacano 
with 14 points and Garrett 
Reynolds with 12 points. 

Discount Self-Storage 
beat Yellow Cab 28-12 
behind Jonathan Bain' s game 
high 14 points. Also playing 
well for Self-Storage were 
Jacob Bianculli and Ryan 
Camgan. 

For Yellow Cab, Anthony 
DeBello scored a team high 
six points and Tim Durgm 
scored four points. 



NQHS Basketball Hall of Fame 
Seeking Nominations 



The North Quincy High 
School Men's Basketball 
Hall ofFame Committee IS 
currently seeking 

nominations for their next 
induction ceremonv. 



If you would like to Sontoro at (617) 984-8751 

nominate adeserving NQHS or email your information 

basketball player who has t o 

been out of high scho«.)l for at t santoR' (g> quincy k. 1 2 . n u . us 

least ten years, call Mr. Frank by Monday, Jan. 28. 






* 9 0m I M ' . »i i l Hy i < ii ■ Mi< 



> t ■ * «'»*rt"iN#^i 



~* * • < i ■: * 




Dr. Christopher Doyle 
Named Among Best Doctors 



Dr. Christopher Doyle, would you refer them?" 
urology, has been named Doctors selected for this 

among the best doctors in list are among the top five 

America for 2007. an- percent of doctors in the 

nounces Harvard Vanguage country. In total, 26 physi- 

Medical Associates. cians affiliated with Harvard 

Every two years, Boston- Vanguard, were selected to out the year, 

based Best D<x:tors asks over the list. For more information 



Community Programs, Support Groups 
Offered At Quincy Medical Center 



35,0(X) physicians, "If you or 
a loved one needed a doctor 
in your specialty, to whom 



The Quincy practice of 
Harvard Vanguard Medical 
AsstKiates is Iwated at 1 250 
HanccK'k St.. Quincy 

Milton Hospital Programs This Month 

Milton Hospital, a clini- ment and it.s prognosis, 
cal attiliatc of Beth Israel The program is free but 



Quincy Medical Center, ing is available. 
114 Whitwell Sts., hosts a Community programs 

variety of events, programs scheduled in January and 
and support groups through- February are: 

Women's Self Defense 
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 6- 



about any of the programs, 8:30 p.m. 

call the telephone numbers This free course teaches 

listed below. Free valet park- women self-defense tech- 



from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
at the QMC Diabetes Center, 
A4. 

For more information, 
call 617-376-5494. 

Diabetes Self-Manage- 
ment Education Program 

This is a comprehensive 
outpatient nutrition program 



niques for personal safety for patients with diabetes, 
and domestic abuse. To reg- The program reviews nutri 



l)eae«>ness Hospital, isofler- 
ing the tol lowing programs 
liurmg ,lainiar\ 

Childhood Asthma 

.Saltiulas. Jail li>. at 10 
a 111 III the Nangerom I-a1u 
cation ("enter 

l)v>es \oiii child struggle 
u ith shortness ol hre.ith ' 
loin IViliatrKian Olutosin 
I a\emi. Ml), lor a discus 
sion i>t chiklhooj asthma, its 
diaiinosis. niethiuls ot treat 



pre-registration is required. 
Call6l7-696-46(H). 
Take CharRc 
of Your Health! 

rhiirsday. Jan. 24 at (r.M) 
p 111. at Randi>lph High 
.School, lecture hall 1. 

V\'lien It comes to your 
health, an ounce of preven- 
tion IS \M>rth a pound of cure. 
Randolph-based Primary 
Care Physicians Ankur 
.\lehta. M.D.. and Jennifer 



Arpano Chiropractic 

Sate Gentle Treatment 

Of 

• Neck Pain • Headaches 

• Back Pain • Arthritis 

• Sports Iniiirv • Sciatica 

Since 1985 

• BC/BS • Workers Comp 

• Tufts • Auto Accidents 

• HPHC • Medicare/Mass Health 

Free Phone Consultations 

617-773-3200 

arpanochiropractic.com 



Liu, M.D., will discuss many 
measures you can take to 
head illnesses off at the pass, 
including smoking cessation, 
cancer screening and more. . 
The program is free; pre- 
registration required. Call 
6l7-6%-46()(). 

Discipline Strategies 

for Your Child 
Saturday, Jan. 26 at 10 
a.m. in the Nangeroni Edu- 
cation Center. 

Behavior issues and dis- 
cipline strategies are com- 
mon areas of concern for 
families and are often dis- 
cussed at visits with pedia- 
tricians. 

Both new and experi- 
enced parents alike are fre- 
quently searching for posi- 
tive and effective discipline 
strategies to tit within their 
familv structure. 



ister, call 617-376-2001. 
Connect To Health 

New laws require most 
Massachusetts adults to have 
health insurance. That's why 
the Health Connector is hit- 
ting the streets and offering 
one-stop insurance shopping 
in your community to help 
you get the plans and prices 
that fit your needs and bud- 
get best - and avoid future 
penalties. 

Come learn about your 
options under the state's 
Health Care Reform law at 
the following locations on 
Saturday, Feb. 2, from 1 1 
a.m. to 2 p.m. 

• In Quincy - Quincy 
Medical Center, 114 
Whitwell St., 617-773-6100 

• Kam Man Market, 219 



tion, blood glucose monitor- 
ing, wound management and 
understanding insulin ad- 
ministration. 

Physician referral is re- 
quired. 

For more information or 
to register, call 617-376- 
5494. 

Bereavement 
Support Group 



on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 1 
p.m. or appointments are 
available Monday through 
Thursday. Call 617-376- 
5462. 
Volunteer Open House 
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 
1:30-3:30 p.m. 

A wide variety of oppor- 
tunities are available in de- 
partments throughout the 
hospital. The Volunteer Pro- 
gram staff will work with 
you to accommodate prefer- 
ences for days, hours and 
type of work. 

To find out more about 
the Volunteer Program, call 
Marilyn McAllister, 617- 
376-5368. 

SUPPORT GROUPS 
Alcoholics Anonymous, 



Beginning Wednesday, meets every Sunday, 7:30-9 



Feb. 27 

This group will meet for 
seven sessions and is in- 
tended to help alleviate feel- 
ings of loss while assisting 
with the healing process. 
There is no cost to attend. 
Pre-registration is required. 
Call 617-376-5502. 
Cancer Resource Center 

The QMC Cancer Re- 



Current age-specific rec 
ommendations for positive Norwood Hospital 
parenting techniques as well 
as effective discipline strat- 
egies will be discussed. Pe- 
diatrician Kara Ryan. M.D. 
The program is free; pre-reg- 
istration required. Call 617- 
696-4600. 



Quincy Ave. (Provided by source Center is open to the 

QMC and Manet Commu- pu^hc each weekday from 9 

nity Health Center, 6 1 7-376- a.m. to 1 p.m., or by appoint- 

3030) ment by calling 617-376- 

• In Norwood at Caritas 5612. 

800 The Cancer Resource 



p.m. For information, call 
781-843-4385. 

Alcoholics Anonymous 
Women, meets every Tues- 
day from 7-9:30 p.m. For 
information, call 617-773- 
9523. 

Al-Anon, meets every 
Monday from 7-8 a.m. and 
every Saturday from 9:30- 
noon. Call 781-848-5922 
for more information. 

Breast Cancer Support 
Group, providing informa- 
tion and emotional support 
for women affected by breast 
cancer. Meets on the first and 



Washington St., 1-800-488- Center provides access to third Wednesday of each 



The GET FIT Solution presents, 



5959 

• In Weymouth at South 
Shore Hospital, 55 Fogg Rd. 
at Route 18,781-340-8000 

For more information, 
call 1-877-623-6765 or visit 
www.mahealthconnector.org. 
Free Diabetes Screening 

Second Tuesday of each 
month, beginning Feb. 12, 



information on cancer care, 
treatment and wellness; free 
cancer-related books, pam- 
phlets and videos; and free 



month. For information, call 
781-843-8007. 

Debtors Anonymous, 

meets every Wednesday 



information for patients, from 7:30-9 p.m. For more 



families and caregivers. 
HTV Testing 

Quincy South Shore 
AIDS Cares offers free, 
anonymous and confidential 
testing. Walk-ins welcome 



Cirliriid/liisiiiril I'crsoiiiil I'ilmss Trainers coach your kids 



Every Tuesday 



IT 



JT 




I .S. \;iti(ni;il (iuaid \nnor\ 
HKM) IhiiKock St.. OiriiKx 

617-481-5806 



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Obstacle Course 

Team Games 

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Muscle Strength IVaining 

Fitness FUNdamentals 



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BRIDGING GAPS 

Similar to a highway bridge help maintain the structure of 



Ti'aveling Exercise Programs 






Indi\idiiiil f raiiilni: 

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Sport s-Sptiitli lYainiii 
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Professional Fitness Trainers... 
"Riivd to most South Shore community area locaticHis 



spanning two embankments to 
connect a roadway gap, a den- 
tal txidge replaces missing teeth 
with prosthetic teeth (known as 
the "pcMitic" that span the g^ 
b^ween remaining healthy teedi 
an either side. One imp(»tant 
fTiDcti(»i of the dental bri(%e is 
preventing the adjacent teeth 
from drifting into the empty 
space. Tbe te^ to which a fixed 
bridge is attached are called 
"^Hitment te^." In most cases, 
these ^>utment te^ must be 
fsepared to accept the bridge. If 
they arc reasonably healthy and 
€ree of Ivge fillings, the dentist 
may recommfHid a r^in-bonded 
bridge, which reduces the 
amouiM (^iwc^sary fxepantfion 
l^ fiutAg the pontic to metal 
bMkds that are bonded to the 
abaiinHtt teeth. 

Repbdaf BMiig toedi will 
imfvove the entire hedlb of yoor 
turround- 
cmiiK} 



your face and jaw. It's obvious 
that our smiles (or more specifi- 
cally, our teeth) are in^rtant to 
us in many ways. We'll help you 
decide if and what type of tddge 
would be right fm- you. Our team 
is comprised of a group of [hx)- 
fessionals dedicated to making 
your dental experience as pleas- 
ant as possible. You will find our 
staff knowledgeable, courteous, 
and helpful. We're located at 44 
GreoUeaf Street, where we of- 
fer excqjtional professicMial den- 
tal care. Please call 617-479- 
6220 to schedule an appoint- 
ment We (^er the services of an- 
esthesiology with a hilly traii^ 
and qualified anesthesiologist. 
Our web address is 
www.auincvdentist.com. 

P.S.A "cantilever bridge " is 
used when there are healthy teeth 
(to which the bridge may be at- 
tached) on only one side of the 
gap, and the area is under less 
stress. 



information, call 781-925- 
2077. 

Emotions Anonymous, 
meets every Sunday from 3- 
4:30 p.m. Call 617-328- 
8988 for more information. 

Fibromyalgia Support 
Group, meets every third 
Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. For 
more information, call 781- 
848-0462. 

Narcotics Anonymous, 
meets on Wednesdays from 
7-8 p.m. (781-848-4910), 
Saturdays from 7-8:30 p.m. 
(617-947-1754) and on the 
first Sunday of each month 
(the second on holidays) 
from noon to 5 p.m. (617- 
947-0718. 

Nicotine Anonymous, 
meets every Monday and 
Friday from 5:45 to 6:45 
p.m. For information, call 
617-276-3699. 

National Stuttering As* 
sociation, meets on the sec- 
ond Wednesday of each 
month from 7-9 p.m. Call 
781-337-5323 for informa- 
tion. 

Overeaters Anonymous, 
meets every Tuesday from 7- 
8 p.m. For information, call 
781-641-2303. 

South Shore Healthy 
Aging, meets on the first Fri- 
day of each month from 
9:30-11 a.m. CaU 617-472- 
6600, Ext 208. 



riN 



Thursday, January 17,2098 



Qiiincy 6(1 



Page 21 




Kina 



ACROSS 


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© 2008 King heaiures Synd.. Inc. 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOFF 




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snow can cause leaves and branches to break. 

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trees, shrubs and hedges. 



e 2006 by King FMturM Syndteau. Inc. WorW rtgrMi raMrvwt. 



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1. U.S. STATES: In what 
state is Mount Rushmore 
located? 

2. ANATOMY: Where is 
the ulna in the human body? 

3. ANCIENT WORLD: 
Who kidnapped Helen of 
Troy? 

4. LITERATURE: Who 
wrote the novel "Light in 
August"? 

5. HISTORY: In what year 
was the first Zeppelin 
night? 

6. INVENTIONS: What 
did Elisha Otis invent? 

7. GENERAL KNOWL- 
EDGE: Where is original 
Mayo Qinic located? 

8. MUSIC: What was the 
nationality of composer 



Frederic Chopin? 

9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: 
What is a lurcher? 

10. RELIGION: What is a 
more common name for the 
religious group called Unit- 
ed Society of Believers in 
Christ's Second Appearing? 

Answers 

1 . South Dakota 

2. Forearm 

3. Paris 

4. William Faulkner 
5.1900 

6. Elevator safety brake 

7. Rochester, Minn. 

8. Polish 

9. A kind of dog 

10. Shakers 

O 2008 King Feanires Synd. Inc. 



50 Trivia Quizzes ^.=0, 



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ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) You might be hurt by a 
colleague's harsh criticism. 
But don't let it shake your 
confidence in what you're 
trying to do. A more positive 
aspect starts to appear by 
week's end. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) You're torn between your 
sensible self and the part of 
you that enjoys acquiring 
lovely things. Best advice: 
Wait for an end-of-month 
sale and then buy something 
wonderful. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) Your artistic side has 
practical applications this 
week, such as redecorating 
your home or redesigning 
your personal stationery. 
Whatever you do, someone 
special will like it. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) You could be drawn into a 
problem 'twixt friends or 
family members. Best bet: 
Ask the questions that go to 
the heart of the matter, then 
get them all together for a 
group hug. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
As much as you love being 
the center of attention, your 
big Lion's heart impels you 
to share the spotlight wi^ a 
colleague who helped you 
with that well-praised pro- 
ject. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) Your eagerness to 
act on a challenge is wisely 
tempered early in the week 
by a lack of necessary infor- 
mation. Things begin to clear 



up during the weekend. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) A relationship 
you'd hoped would keep 
going seems to be going 
nowhere. Close it out and 
move on to a brighter roman- 
tic aspect just begirming to 
manifest itself. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Things don't 
go completely as planned this 
week. But enjoy the surpris- 
es, even if you have to adjust 
your schedule. Some of them 
could be quite delightful. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem- 
ber 22 to December 2 1 ) Mak- 
ing choices is usually easy 
for straight-shooting 

Archers. But a new develop- 
ment could deflect your aim. 
Try to put off decisions until 
you know more. 

CAPRICORN ^December 
22 to January 19) While part 
of you might prefer taking a 
more familiar path, let your 
more daring and — adrnit it 
— super-curious self see 
what the unexplored has to 
offer. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Those nasty 
types have slithered back 
under the rocks and prresent 
no more problems. Now's the 
time to move ahead on that 
promising new relationship. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) A new offer could 
clear up that lingering money 
problem. Also, a more confi- 
dent attitude on your part 
might well help get that per- 
sonal situation back on track. 

BORN THIS WEEK: You 
have a way of turning chaos 
into order. You're also gener- 
ous with your help for those 
who seek it. 

e 2008 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Wishing 




h Well® 


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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that wiil give you a 
message every day It's a numerical puzzle designed to spelt 
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the 
rujmt>erof letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. Ifthe number is less 
than 6, add 3. The result is your key number. Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

teooi Hirq '■tmum SynocM* inc 'Nam ngos aMoiM 



n. ui-ajiBi 



''^_4i»- 



22 <H&'0td&k8-V& 'KUd.y.'iUiiLV'W.'im 



COITLIAI^IES 



Virginia L. Dreier, 86 

Nurse Aid 



Virginia L. Cliisliolin, 85 

Active Parishioner Of St Mary's Church 



A funeral Mass for Vir- 
ginia L. (Giancola) Dreier, 
86, of Quincy. formerly of 
Braintree and Boston, a 
nurse aid, was celebrated 
Jan. 10 in Saint John the 
Baptist Church, Quincy Cen- 
ter. 

Mrs. Dreier died Jan. 7 at 
the Hancock Park Nursing 
and Rehabilitation Facility. 
Quincy. 

Bom in Memphis. Tenn., 
she hud lived in Qumcy for 
50 years. 

Mrs. Drcicr was a nurse 
aid at Braintree Hospital ft)r 
20 years. 

Her main love was her 
family and extended family 
a! O'F^rien Towers in 
Qumcy. She was proud to be 
able to care for people and 
adviKate on their behalf. 

Mrs. Dreier was president 



and vice president of the Ten- 
ants Association at O'Brien 
Towers. 

She volunteered for the 
Meals on Wheels program 
and Father Bill's Place. 

She was also an avid Red 
Sox fan. 

Husband of the late John 
Dreier. she is survived by 
two sons. John Dreier and his 
wife Maryanne of New York 
and James Dreier and his 
wife Bertha of North Caro- 
lina; 10 grandchildren and 10 
great-grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 HanccKk 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the American 
Heart Association. 20 Speen 
St., Framingham, MA 
01701. 



A funeral Mass for Vir- 
ginia L. "Ginnie" (Dohaher) 
Chisholm, 85, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 11 in Saint 
Mary's Church, 95 Crescent 
St., West Quincy. 

Mrs. Chisholm died Jan. 
7 at the Muhlenberg Regional 
Medical Center in New Jer- 
sey after a long illness. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
she was educated in Quincy 
schools. She was a 1939 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and was an active 
memberof the ReunionCom- 
mittee. 

She had lived most of her 




VIRGINIA L. CHISHOLM 

she was the devoted mother 
of Patricia Chisholm of New 
Jersey, formerly of Quincy; 
and Ginger Medina and her 



Barbara L. O'Connor, 87 

Retired Registered Nurse 



A funeral sen ice for Bar- 
bara L. "Pagie" (Page) 
O'Connor. 87. of Quincy, 
formerly of West Warwick, 
R.I.. a retired registered 
nurse, was held Friday at the 
Kei>hane Funeral Home. .333 
HanciK'k St.. North Quincy. 

Mrs. O'Connor died Jan. 
7 at home. 

She was born in West 
Warwick, R.I.. 

Mrs. O'Connor worked as 
a registered nurse at New En- 
gland Baptist Hospital in 
Boston for two years before 
retinng in 1944. 

She was a member of the 
St. James Bowling League 
and the Sacred Heart Church 



Catholic Women's Club. 

Wife of the late Joseph 
O'Connor, she is survived by 
two sons, Thomas O'Connor 
and Jerry O'Connor; a 
daughter, Joan O'Connor; 
two sisters, Helen Brown of 
Rhode Island and Elizabeth 
McCallum of Connecticut; 
and seven grandchildren and 
.seven great-grandchildren. 

She was also the mother 
of the late Robert O'Connor. 

Interment was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Old Colony 
Hospice, 1 Credit Union 
Way, Randolph. MA 02368. 



life in Quincy before moving husband George of Carver, 
to New Jersey five years ago. 

She was a memberof Saint 
John the Baptist Church in 
Quincy and belonged to the 
Ladies Sodality. She later 
became an active parishio- 
ner of Saint Mary's Church 
in West Quincy. 

Mrs. Chisholm was a lov- 
ing and devoted wife, mother, 
grandmother, and great- 
grandmother. 

Beloved wife for 50 years 
of the late John A. Chisholm, 



Mildred A. Saudade 

Retired Executive Secretary 

A graveside service for 
Mildred A. (Days) Saudade 
of Quincy, a retired execu- 
tive secretary, was held Jan. 
1 1 at the Massachusetts Na- 
tional Cemetery in Boume. 

Mrs. Saudade died Jan. 4 
at the CJW Hospital in Rich- 
mond, VA after a progres- 
sive illness. 

A longtime resident of 
Quincy, she most recently 
lived with her daughter's 
family in Virginia. 

Mrs. Saudade retired from 
the Quincy Public School 
system where she worked as 
an executive secretary. 

Caring, selfless and 




MILDRED A. SAUDADE 



She is also survived by a 
sister, Dorothy Connell of 
Abington; two grandchildren 
and three great-grandchil- 
dren and four nieces and one 
nephew. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 



Brownsville, VT; her daugh- 
ter, Mary E. Saudade-Farley, 
granddaughter Tiffany Jenna 
Farley and son-in-law Timo- 
thy A. Farley, all of Colonial 



thrifty, she enjoyed travel- Heights, VA. 
ling,cooking,reading,home- Funeral arrangements 

maker, crocheting and knit- ^^^e made by the Dennis 

ting, among other crafts. She Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 

also enjoyed gomg to Bmgo gj^, g^ Quincy. 



games with her friends and 
family. 

Wife of the late James J. 
Saudade, she is survived by 
her son, James J. Saudade of 



Memorial donations may 
be made to St. Jude 
Children's Research Hospi- 
tal, 501 St. Jude PL, Mem- 
phis, TN 38105-1905. 

Domenic P. Taverna, 89 

Owned Engineering Company 



Virginia A. Roffey 



4 VfOUeHT 



iK)N McCarthy 

Managing Director 



m 

^^^^^F^^A '^'^ at tli^Dcware Funeral Home have 
I^^H^^K^ ^Hj always given personal eonunitment 
m^_j2^_^^^| to providing comfort, understanding 
and professional service. 

Our sincere commitment to excel- 
lent service is shared by every assod- 
ate on our staff. Our Funeral Home provides for every 
detail . . . from pre-need funeral planning to care after the 
senlce. 

We at the Deware Funeral Home have been known 
through the years for our dignified service and for our 
reputation for fair prices. 

You can always be assured that our most important 
concern k you and your family and your desires. We are 
proud of our dedication to treat families like they were our 
own. . . 

At our Funeral Home, you will find care and concern 
that go far beyond the eqwctcd . . . just when you need it 
most . .. 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancoclc Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus S«vice 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Soiace Available 

A Service FeamUy Affiliate cfAFFS md Service Corp. htt, 

492 Rack Street » FaU River. MA 02720 • (508) 676-2454 




kU OUr.,^,^// 



A funeral service for Vir- 
ginia A. (Rounds) Roffey of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, was held Jan. 1 1 in 
First Baptist Church, 
Weymouth. 

Mrs. Roffey died Jan. 8. 

She was the beloved wife 
of the late Gerald E. Roffey 
of Quincy and the loving 
mother of Timothy J. and 
Linda S. Roffey both of 
Weymouth, Frank DiCroce 
in and his wife Merrie of San 
Diego, CA, Laurianne 
Marron of Weymouth, Jen- 
nifer L. Christopher Roffey 
and his wife Sandy all of 
Braintree. 

She is also survived by 
three sisters, Marilyn 
Holliday of San Diego, CA, 
Lx)is Finnin of Plympton and 
Carla Medeiros of 
Bridgewater; nine grandchil- 
dren and many nieces, neph- 




VBRGINIA A. ROFFEY 

ews and friends. 

She was also the sister of 
the late John Rounds. 

Burial was in Knollwood 
Memorial Park, Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Pyne 
Keohane Funeral Home, 21 
Emerald St., Hingham. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Old Colony 
Hospice, 1 Credit Union 
Way, Randolph, MA 02368. 



AlmUuist 

% mm Living Beauty 



Elegant 
Arrangements 



EL O W E R L A 
OMOEN C0im. fUMCT A orrs 



326 FRANKUN STREET, QUINCY ♦ 617-479-2020 



A funeral service for 
Domenic P. Taverna, 89, of 
Hanson, formerly of 
Watertown and Quincy, 
president of Watertown En- 
gineering & WTiitman Burial 
Vault Co., was held Jan. 1 1 
at the Leighton-MacKinnon 
Funeral Home, Hanson. 

Mr. Taverna died Jan. 6 at 
Coyne Nursing Facility in 
Rockland after a long battle 
with Alzheimer's Disease. 

Bom in Watertown, he 
was a graduate of Newton 
Trade School. 

He was a veteran of the 
Army during World War II, 
serving overseas and in Af- 
rica on the pipeline, engi- 
neering. 

After Worid War H, Mr. 
Taverna started Watertown 
Engineering and was presi- 
dent for more than 40 years. 
In the begiiming the firm did 
structural and steel fabrica- 
tion and then moved into the 
manufacturing of concrete 
burial vaults during the 
1960s. 

He established what is 
now Whitman Burial Vault 
Co. in Whitman for the past 



Over 59 Years Of Personalized Service 
SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
FRANCIS M. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
CNMICY, MASSACHUSETTS 021 69 

(617)472-6344 



20 years. 

Mr. Taverna had lived in 
Hanson for the past four years 
after living in Quincy and 
Watertown. He was dedi- 
cated to his family and busi- 
ness. 

He was the son of the late 
John and Mary (Martocchio) 
Tavema and the beloved hus- 
band of the late Irene (Har- 
ris) Tavema. 

He is survived by two 
sons, Richard Tavema of 
Hanson and Robert Tavema 
of Bamstable; a daughter, 
Lorraine G. Donovan of 
Hanson; five grandchildren, 
four great-grandchildren, and 
several nieces and nephews. 

He was also the brother of 
the late Frank Tavema and 
the late William Tavema. 

Interment was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Leighton- 
MacKinnon Funeral Home, 
4 West Washington St., 
Hanson. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Cerebral Palsy 
of Massachusetts, 43 Old 
Colony Ave., Quincy, MA 
02169. 

Hamel, Wickens & 

TVoupe Funeral 

Home 

Honored Providers of: 

B Veterans 
Funeral C«e" 

PHONE TOLL FREE 

(800) 696-5887 

26 Adams Street 

Quincy, Ma 02169 

wwwJiamelFimCTalCare.con] 






Ernest J. Zimmerman 

Quincy Water Dept Employee, 
Past President Quincy Youth Hockey 



Madeline S. Louis 

Member Of St. Joseph *s Ladies Sodality 



Johnpaul Rogers, 60 

Decorated War Veteran, Draftsman 



A funeral Mass for Ernest 
J. Zimmerman of Quincy, a 
Quincy Water Department 
employee and past president 
of the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association, was celebrated 
Tuesday in Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mr. Zlimmerman died Jan. 
10. 

He had lived in Quincy for 
more than 40 years. 

He worked for the Water 
Department for the City of 
Quincy. 

He was the past president 
of the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association and also served 
on the Board of Directors. 
He was an avid sports fan. 

Beloved husband of 
Marilyn (Goodwin) 

Zimmerman, he was the de- 
voted father of Mark C. 
Zinmierman and his fiancee 
Kara Barry of Randolph, 
Brian J. Zimmerman of 
Quincy, and Eric C. 
Zimmerman and his wife 
Maura of Weymouth. 

He is also survived by two 
aunts, Margaret King and 
Catherine McGue, both of 




ERNEST J. ZIMMERMAN 

Quincy; a close friend Uncle 
George Wagner and many 
cousins. 

He was brother of the late 
Mary Ann Allen. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association, 60 
Murphy Memorial Dr., 
Quincy, MA 02 1 69 or Sacred 
Heart Church, 386 Hancock 
St., North Quincy, MA 
02171. 



A funeral Mass for 
Madeline S. (George) Louis 
of Quincy and Winter Ha- 
ven, a devoted wife, mother 
and grandmother, was cel- 
ebrated Tuesday in Saint 
Joseph's Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Louis died Jan. 10. 

She was a lifelong resident 
of Quincy. 

Mrs. Louis was an active 
member of the St. Joseph's 
Ladies Sodality, as well as a 
member of the Sons of Leba- 
non Club in Quincy. 

She was a talented cook 
who truly enjoyed preparing 
meals for her family. 

The beloved wife of the 
late Joseph G. Louis, she was 
the daughter of the late 
Simon and Jenny George. 

She was the loving mother 
of Robert G. Louis of Pem- 
broke, Patricia A. Louis of 
Hanson, Judith A. and 
Reginald F. Jacobs of 
Hanover, Joseph F. and Jean 
Louis of Whitman and the 




A funeral service for 
Johnpaul Rogers, 60, a 
draftsman and decorated war 
veteran, was held Jan. 1 1 at 



never keep him off the dance 
floor. 

Mr Rogers was an avid 
Boston sports fan and at- 



the Dennis Sweeney Funeral tended as many games as he 
Home, 74 Elm St., Quincy. could at Fenway Park and 



Mr. Rogers died at home 
suddenly Jan. 3. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was a graduate of Quincy 
Vocational High School. 



Boston Garden. 

Beloved son of the late 
John A. and Thelma E. (Rae) 
Rogers, he is survived by 
two brothers, William A. 



MADELINE S. LOUIS 

late Barbara E. Louis. 

She was the sister of the 
late Robert A. George and 
Mary (George) Scott. 

She is also survived by 
seven grandchildren, four 
great-grandchildren, a niece 
and a nephew and a cousin. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 



Before enlisting in the Rogers of Watertown and 
Marines, he worked at Kenneth R. Rogers of South 



Electoswitch in Weymouth. 
Mr. Rogers was a deco- 
rated war veteran who served 
two tours in Vietnam where 
he was crew chief for 



Weymouth; two sisters, 
Meredith A. Rogers and her 
partner Marilyn Brown, and 
Theresa Rogers, all of San 
Francisco; and many nieces 



Medivac helicopters, and and nephews. 



achieved the rank of Lance 
Corporal. 

He later worked as a 
draftsman in the sheet metal 
business. 



He was also the brother of 
the late M. Joyce Morrill and 
Joan E. "Betsy" Rogers. 

Burial with military hon- 
ors was in Mount Wollaston 



Mr Rogers lived with a Cemetery, Quincy. 



degenerative hip disease 
from an early age. However, 
anyone who knew him 
would tell you that this could 



Phyllis M. Cudworth 

Clerical Worker 



Memorial donations may 
be made to the Vietnam Vet- 
erans Memorial Fund, 1023 
15th St., NW, 2nd floor, 
Washington, D.C. 20005. 



Anne Condon 

Past President Germantown Garden Club 



Ernest R Cislaghi, 90 

Self-Employed Builder 



A funeral Mass for Ernest 
F Cislaghi, 90, of Plymouth, 
formerly of Braintree, 
Duxbury and Quincy, a self- 
employed builder in home 
repair and construction, was 
celebrated Wednesday in 
Saint Francis of Assisi 
Church, Braintree. 

Mr. Cislaghi died Jan. 10 
at the Life Care Center of 
Plymouth. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools and was a graduate 
of Quincy High School. 

He had lived in Plymouth 
for the past year. Previously, 
he lived in Braintree for 15 
years and in Duxbury for 15 
years. 

He was well-known as the 
star quarterback for the 
Quincy Manets football 



team. 

He was also recognized as 
an avid bridge player 
throughout the South Shore. 

Beloved husband of the 
late Marguerite H. (Killoran) 
Cislaghi, he is survived by 
his children, Justin M. 
Cislaghi and his wife 
Josephine of Denver, CO; 
Jennifer Rinas-Behne and 
her husband Randy of Iowa; 
a sister, Madeline Brown of 
Iowa; three grandchildren 
and many nieces and neph- 
ews. 

He was the father of the 
late Jeffrey Cislaghi. 

Interment was in May- 
flower Cemetery, Duxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 



A funeral Mass for Phyllis 
M. Cudworth of Quincy, a 
clerical worker, was cel- 
ebrated Monday in Sacred 
Heart Chapel, North Quincy. 

Miss Cudworth died Jan. 
10. 

She had lived in Quincy 
for nearly 50 years. 

She was a clerical worker 
for the Hartford Insurance 
Company. She previously 
had worked for Aetna Insur- 
ance. 

She enjoyed the many ac- 
tivities at the Quincy Reha- 
bilitation and Nursing Facil- 
ity over the past few months. 

She was the devoted sis- 



ter of Patricia A. Miceli of 
Quincy, Barbara J. Mahoney 
of Newburyport, Janet L. 
LeClair of Florida and the 
late Raymond Cudworth. 

She is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the American 
Cancer Society, Central NE 
Region, 18 Tremont St., 
Suite 700, Boston, MA 
02108. 



Joanne C. O'Brien, 84 



Patricia Franks Craven 



A memorial service for 
Patricia "Patti" Franks Cra- 
ven, 59, of Quincy, was held 
Jan. 12 at the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Bom in Portland, OR, she 
had lived her life in the Bos- 
ton area. She graduated from 
St. Gregory's High School 
and after attending business 
school was employed by 
PrimeSource Building Prod- 
ucts (formerly Kraft Whole- 
sale). 

Beloved wife of the late 
John Craven, she is survived 
by her mother, Anne 
(O'Halloran) Franks of 
Braintree; her brotber, Jdin 
Franks and his wife^ Ellen; 



two nieces, Kristin Bissell 
and her husband Scott and 
daughter EUie, Lori Finn and 
her husband Joe and son 
Alex and her extended fami- 
lies in Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut and New York. 

Interment was at the Mas- 
sachusetts National Cem- 
etery in Bourne. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Todd Ouida 
Children's Foundation, 591 
Clarendon Court, River 
Edge. NJ. 07661; the Mary 
Kaye Fund, c/o Waldron. 1 76 
Marlborough St., Apt. 2, 
Boston, MA 02116; or the 
American Diabetes Associa- 
tion, 330 Congress St., 5th 
Fir., Boston, MA 02210. 



Private funeral services 
were held for Joanne C. 
(Riley) O'Brien, 84, of 
Quincy, who died Jan. 6 at 
the Southwood at Norwell 
Nursing Center after a long 
illness. 

Wife of the late Joseph H. 
O'Brien, she is survived by 
her children, Karen J. and her 
husband George Douglas, Jr 
of Sagamore Beach, Mary 
M. Aikens of Brockton, and 
Michael J. and his wife 
Sheila O'Brien of Everett. 

She is also survived by a 
son-in-law, Joseph J. 
Callahan, Sr. of Rockland; 
and eight grandchildren and 
four great-grandchildren. 

She was also the mother 
of the late Rita M. O'Brien 
and the late Susan T. 



Callahan and the grand- 
mother of the late Maureen 
M. O'Brien. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Humane So- 
ciety of the United States or 
the MSPCA of Centerville, 
MA 02601. 

COA In Need 
Of Bath Seats 

The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need for bath seats 
for senior citizens. 

If you have one to donate, 
call the COA at 617-376- 
1245. 



A funeral Mass for Anne 
(Wassell) Condon of Quincy, 
a past president of the 
Germantown Garden Club, 
was celebrated Jan. 12 in 
Saint Ann's Church, 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Condon died Jan. 7. 

Bom and raised in South 
Boston, she was a graduate 
of South Boston H'gh 
School. 

She had lived in Quincy 
for 69 years. 

Mrs. Condon was an avid 
gardener enjoying all plants 
and flowers. 

She was a member of the 
Wollaston Garden Club and 
was the past president of the 
Germantown Garden Club. 

She was also a member of 



the Heritage Club of Quincy 
and the Quincy Historical 
Society. 

Mrs. Condon enjoyed do- 
ing crossword puzzles and 
loved to read. 

She was also a member of 
the St. Ann's Senior Citizens 
Club. 

Wife of the late Charles F. 
Condon, she is survived by 
a son, Charles F. Condon, Jr. 
of Gaithersburg, MD. 

Interment was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Quincy Ani- 
mal Shelter, 56 Broad St., 
Quincy, MA 02 169. 



Other Obituaries On Page 25 




Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 




DOLAN 

FUNERAL SERVICES 
'Caring for your life's journey' 

♦ Funerals 

♦ Cremations 

♦ Pre-Arrangements 

Service times and directions at: 
www.dolanfuneral.com 



THE DOLAN FAMILY 
W. Craig 
Paul F. 
Frederick \. 
Courtney 



U40 WASHINGTON STREET 

DORCHESTER, MA 02124 

(617) 298-8011 

4*0 GRANITE AVENUE 

MILTON, MA 02186 

(617) 698-6264 



(1 ri-rlP "r; 
P«Re24 



••4- 



Thursday, January 17, 20M 



Religicn 



First Church Of Squantum 



St Chrysostom's Church To Honor 
Rev. Dr. Thomas Pang Sunday 



St. Chrysostom's Episco- 
pal Church, 1 Linden St., 
Quincy, will honor the Rev. 
Dr. Thomas Pang, Canon for 
Asiamerica Ministries at the 
Cathedral Church of St. Paul 
in Boston, and director of the 
Episcopal Quincy Chinese 
Center. Sunday. Jan. 20. 

Rev. Pang will leave the 
area for a two-year period to 
assist in the development of 



the missionary Diocese of 
Macau in China, in his role 
as Assistant to the Bishop 
there. 

During the 10 a.m. lit- 
urgy. Fr. Pang will preach his 
"good-bye" sermon and be 
honored by the parish at the 
coffee hour to follow. 

The community is invited 
to join the parish in honor- 



ing Fr. Pang for his continu- 
ing role in the development 
and implementation of pro- 
grams promoting cross cul- 
tural integration, understand- 
ing, and cooperation in 
Quincy and the metropolitan 
area. 

For more information, 
call the parish office at (617) 
472-0737. 



The First Church of 
Squantum, 164 Belle vue Rd. 
announces its Book Club 
will meet Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 
7 p.m. in the church parlor. 

The book selection is the 
first three chapters (more or 



less half of the book) of The 
Golden Notebook, written by 
the 2007 Nobel Prize winner 
in literature, Doris Lessing. 
The Fiber Arts Group, 
which is open to women in- 
terested in handcrafts, meets 



Tuesday mornings at 9:30 
a.m. in the main floor of the 
Sunday School room. 

For more information, 
call the church office at 6 1 7- 
328-6649. 



Bethany Congregational Church 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, 1 8 Spear St., Quincy 
Center, will have a Worship 
Service and Church School 
at 10 a.m. 

The Rev. Gary W. Smoth- 
ers will conduct the service 



and preach a sermon entitled ship time in the Allen Parlor. 

"Sermon From Mark 2 1 ) The Light refreshments will be 

Harvest Is Sure." served. 

Childcare is available for All are welcome, 

infants and toddlers. The church is handi- 

Following the worship capped accessible, 
service, there will be fellow- 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Quincy Community United Methodist 



The Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church. 310 
Manet Ave.. Quincy. Sunday 
service and Sunday school 
will be held at 9:30 a.m. 

Pastor John Castricum 
will deliver his sermon "Be- 



longing to Christ." 

Janice Hughes will read 
scripture First Corinthians 1 : 
10-18. Shirley Harrington 
and Joseph Giggey will serve 
for the Diaconate 

Fellowship coffee hour 



will follow the service 
hosted by Gayle Mackay. 

Cub Scouts meet Monday 
at 6:30 p.m. 

Choir rehearses Wednes- 
day at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 
9 a.m. under the direction of 



Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston, will 
have Sunday worship and 
Sunday school beginning at 
10:30 a.m. 

Adult Bible study begins 
at 9 a.m. 



The lector will be Kelly 
Cobble. Ushers are Doreen 
Dennehy and Gary Smith. 

Coffee hour hosts are 
Kathy Emerson, Karin Paul 
and Linda Johnson. 

All are welcome. The 
church is handicapped acces- 



sible. 

Family Movie Night Sat- 
urday, Jan. 19 at 6 p.m. will 
feature the film 

"Ratatouille." Free admis- 
sion, popcorn and soda. 

For more information, call 
the church at 617-773-3319. 



Lois Zulauf, director. 

Quincy Point Congregational 



St. Chrysostom's Episcopal Church 



Plans are underway for 
the Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church fourth annual 
Mardi Gras Saturday. I cb. 2 
troni 6 to *> p.m. 

There will be dinner, a si- 
lent auction, dancing, and the 
Crowning i>l the King and 



Queen of Mardi Gras. Tick- The Rev. Ann G. Suzedell St. Chrysostom's Episco- 

ets can be purchased from will give the sermon "He pal Church, 1 Linden St., 

the church office by calling Brought His Brother." She Wollaston, will celebrate the 

617-773-6424. will be accompanied by the annual "Feast of St. 

All ages welcome. The deacon of the day, Adam Chrysostom" at the 10 a.m. 

event is alcohol-free. McGhee and Jean Kane as liturgy Sunday, Jan. 27. 

This Sunday, the worship the lay reader, 
service begins at 10 a.m. 



Immediately following 
the celebration of their pa- 
tron saint, brunch will be 
served and the parish will 
conduct their annual parish 
meeting. 



The Rev. David Hefling, 
rector, will give a "state of 
the parish" report and Ves- 
try officers and other mem- 
bers for the coming year will 
be elected. 



AssembUeis of God 



[tadT idituis 

158 W&sh/ngton ^t.rQuincy 
phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worshi p: 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Contemporary Worship 
■■ •Marriage & Family Group 
■I •Inten^ational Fellowship 





St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 61 7-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday. 4pm. Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 1 1:30am. Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



tfi^Ki 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Cattmlic Community walking togettier 

in Faith, Worstiip, Education and Sennce' 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10;30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Acce$sit>le 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



UNITED RRST PARISH CHURCH 

1306 Hancock Stmt 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-773-1290 

www.ufpc.oiy 

Sunday Worship 10:30 am 

We are a welcoming Congregation 




First Church of Squantum 

164BeB9weSi'617-32»S649 

Pastor Michael S. Robertson 

Co-Pastor Dr Emmy Rotyertson 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

All Am Welcome 



QUINCY POtNT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-77S-&424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



I 



To Advertise 

in this Directory, 

Call617'471'3100 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 9am 
CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Hwydicapped accessible & 

hkuidicapped parking, skie entrarKO 

air conditioned 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 
617-479-8778 • www.hncong.org 

Worship Service and 
Sunday School at 9:30 am 

'Belonging to Christ' 
Rev. John Castricum 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST] 

44 School St., 
Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday (Vigil Mass) 4 p.m. 

Surxtay 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m. 
and 1 1 a.m. (Famity Liturgy) 

WeelnSey Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
HarKMca^oped AcceesM)ie 




Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 

Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

10 ajn. Worship Service 

and Church School 

Rev. Gary W. Smothers 

'Sermon From Mark 21) 

The Harvest Is Sure* 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 

Following Worship Service 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

United Church of Christ 

48 Winthrop Ave. - 617-773-7432 

Pastor: Rev. Mary Lou GIfford 

Sunday Worship at 10 a.m. 

Rev. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Sermon: 

'International Treasure - 

The Book' 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Comer of Hancocii & Linden Sts., Quincy 

(617) 472-0737 • www.stclirysostoni.coni 

Rev. David Hefling 

Sunday Eucharist 10 a.ni. 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Wednesday Eucharist 8:30 aan. 

Nursery Care during Service 

C(^ee Hour Following 

ALL WELCOME 

THRIFT SHOP hours W, Th, Fr. 10-4 




UNION CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rcl.,Wollaston 

(617)479-6661 

Sunday Worship Sen/ice 

10 AM 
Rev. John Swanson, Pastor 



EVANGEUCAL CHURCH OF ATUNTIC 
65 Newbury Ave. Not i/i Quincy 

(617) 847-4444 • 

Interim Pastor Wayne Earl 

10:30 Sunday Worship 

Sermon: 'Kingdom Living' 

7PM Brazilian A/G Senflce 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

50 Huckins Ave., Squantum 

617-773-5878 • Pastor M\ke Fehan 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. • Gospel of Matthew 

Children's Class 10 a.m. 

Bible Discussion Group Wed. 7:45 p.m. 

Handicap Accessible 

ennail: infoQsauantumcf.org 




Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 

37 E. Elm Av«., Wollaston 
|617)472-S6e9 
On Th* Campiw Of y^^s 
Kastom NacarMM Cdtog* 

Pastor Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

gtfnrfgygervfegff 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children's 

Sunday School 

1 1 a.m. - Blended Worship Sennce 

Come Worship wllhUsI 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNrTED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr Susan Jarek-Glidden, Pastor 



.<r 



Saint Ann's Church 

7S7 Hneock SU WolHloii 

•$\14IHm 

Pastor Rav. John J. Ronaghan 

Waakand Matt Schadula: 

Saturday 4K)0 PM 

Sunday 7KX). 9:00. 1 1 :30AM 

Daly Mataaa: 8K)0 AM 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 817-472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



GOOD SHEPHERD 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

308 West Squantum Street 

No. Quincy, MA 02171 

617-328-8348 

The Rtv. Nathan D. PIpho 

10:30 a.m. Holy Communion Sundiy 
6:30 pm WedrtMitay NigM able Study, F«loiMhip 



Thursday, January 17, 2008 Tikm Quinoy Siu& Page 25 



GCITLIAI^IES 



Thomas P. Mullen, 75 

Retired Boston Edison Employee 

A funeral Mass for Tho- 
mas P. Mullen, 75, of 
Quincy, a retired Boston 
Edison Company employee, 
was celebrated Tuesday in 
Saint John the Baptist 
Church, 44 School St., 
Quincy. 

Mr. Mullen died Jan. 10 
suddenly at home. 

Bom in Dorchester, he at- 
tended St. Margaret's Gram- 
mar School and graduated THOMAS P. MULLEN 
from Boston College High Mullen, he is survived by his 
School in 1950. children, Tricia M. London 

He received a bachelor's and her husband Brian of 



Lloyd A. MacPhee, 83 

Driver For The H.P. Hoods Co. 




degree from the University 
of Massachusetts in Boston 
in 1985. 

Mr. Mullen had lived in 
Quincy for the last 45 years. 

He was employed for 
more than 40 years at the 
former Boston Edison Com- 
pany. He also worked as a 
bartender at the Fowler 



Westwood, and Thomas E. 
Mullen and his wife Jenni- 
fer M. Ort of Milton; and five 
grandchildren. 

He was also the brother of 
the late Sr. Catherine Mullen, 
S.C.H., the late Sr. Ann 
Mullen, S.C.H. and the late 
Robert F. Mullen. 

Interment was in Blue Hill 



House in Quincy, the Vene- Cemetery, Braintree. 



tian Gardens and Vaughan's 
Tavern, both in Dorchester. 

Mr. Mullen was proud of 
his Irish heritage, and en- 
joyed traveling to Ireland. 

He served in the U.S. 
Army during the Korean 
War. 

Beloved husband for 48 



Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Sisters of 
Charity of Halifax Retire- 
ment Fund, 125 Oakland St., 



years to Patricia (Mooney) Wellesley Hills, MA 02481. 

Recent Breaks 

Continued From Page 18 

with an obstructed view. Some breaks were caused by doors 
being kicked in. In others, small pants of windows on a door 
or adjacent to it were broken and the suspect reached in and 
unlocked the door. Screens were cut to access windows, which 
were either propped (unlocked) up or forced open. 

In a few cases, front doors were left unlocked. Since so many 
people work or are away from the home during the day, sus- 
pects look for indications that no one is home, like mail or news- 
papers, driveways without cars and upon closer inspection, lis- 
tening for sound coming out of the home. What can be done? 
Firstly, residents need to reduce the chances that they will be 
victimized by eliminating blind spots caused by shrubs or bushes 
around windows and doors. Proper locks, like deadbolts, need 
to be installed so that criminals will have to hit the door numer- 
ous times, which creates noise. If there is a small window next 
to or part of a door that can be broken to gain access, the deadbolt 
lock should not have a twist handle inside. Ground floor win- 
dows should be locked and inserts installed that limit the height 
a wind'^w can be raised. Leaving a radio on with the volume 
up can be enough to discourage a criminal from your house ! A 
car in the driveway is a sign that there could be someone home, 
so join a carpool and leave your car behind. The most impor- 
tant step residents can take is to report anything suspicious in 
their neighborhood, including people who may be soliciting door 
to door. Some criminals will use this mse, appearing to be a 
salesman, knocking on the door repeatedly, determining that 
no one is home and then quickly forcing the door. As in the 
case above, arrests have been made for break-ins, but it is 
through the efforts of the conununity that we are able to pre- 
vent further breaks and catch suspects. 

If you have information about a break-in or any other crime, 
please contact us on the 617 479 1212 line (not traced), the 
Detective Bureau at 617 745 5764, or if it is a drug related 
matter, the I>rug Hotline at 617 328 4527. A new method is to 
use the Quincy Police online option by going to HYPERLINK 
"http://tinyurl.com/ytf6td" http://tinyurl.com/ytf6td, to report 
drug or suspicious activity. 

Mark Crosby, Government Access Coordinator at QATV, 
cable channel 10, will be broadcasting a "Crime Watch" show 
about home security co-hosted with the Quincy Police Depart- 
ment It is a very informative 30minute show on how to secure 
your home and will be shown on January 17th at 6:00 P.M., 
January 18th, at 8:00 A.M., January 23rd, at 600 P.M. and on 
January 24th at 8:00 A.M. 

The streets where break-ins occurred since December 1 st are: 
Bigelow Street, Billings Street, Bradford Street, Burgin Park- 
way, Canton Road, Copeland Street, Copley Road, East Elm 
Avenue, Elm Avenue, Glendale Road, Greene Street, Graham 
Street, Hamden Circle, Hancock Street, (600 and 1300 block). 
Holmes Avenue, Keyes Street, Mechanic Street, Morton Street, 
Moscow Street, Newport Avenue, Old Colony Avenue, Palmer 
Street, Pleasant Street, Quincy Shore Drive, (200 block) Re- 
vere Road, Robertson Street, Sonoma Road, Tafftail Road, 
Vassall Street, NTiUage Drive, Wendall Avenue, Wmthrop Street 
and Woodbine Street 



Funeral services for Lloyd 
A. MacPhee. 83, of 
Braintree, formerly of 
Quincy, a driver for the H.P. 
Hoods Company, were con- 
ducted Wednesday at the 
Fort Square Presbyterian 
Church, 16 Pleasant St., 
Quincy, by the Rev. Richard 
F. Brondyke, pastor. 

Mr. MacPhee died Jan. 1 1 
suddenly at the Quincy 
Medical Center. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools and attended Quincy 
High School. 

He had lived in Braintree 
for the past 50 years. 

Mr. MacPhee served in the 
U.S. Army during World War 
n. He earned the rank of cor- 
poral and served with the A 
Squadron 23 1st AAF Base 
Unit. 

He was employed as a 
driver for the H.P. Hoods 
Company for more than 40 
years. 

Mr. MacPhee was a de- 
voted and passionate Ufelong 
member of the Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church in 
Quincy, where he was a 
former elder. 

He was an active member 
of the Braintree American 
Legion Post #86, where he 



served as the athletic direc- 
tor. 

He was a founding mem- 
ber of the Adams Heights 
Men's Club in Quincy. 

He was well-known 
throughout Braintree as an 
umpire in Braintree Youth 
Baseball and Softball. 

Beloved husband for 54 
years of Shirley M. (Glover) 
MacPhee, he was the de- 
voted father of Margaret G. 
MacPhee of Braintree, Paul 
L. MacPhee of PA and his 
late wife Catherine, Ronald 
F. MacPhee and his wife 
Darlene of Medway, and 
David L. MacPhee and his 
wife Priscilla of Quincy. 

He is also survived by five 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

He was the brother of the 
late Gordon A. MacPhee and 
the late Kathryn S. Welch. 

Interment was in Massa- 
chusetts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church Mis- 
sions Fund, 16 Pleasant St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-001 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Dren Luci for a 
Variance/Finding to convert the second level of the garage for 
home, professional office in violation of Title 17 as amended 
Chapter 17.16.020 (use regulations - accessory uses), and 
17.24 (use) on the premises numbered 15-17 PHIPPS 
STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
1/10/08, 1/17/08 ,,,.,........_,..........^^ 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-002 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of Patrick Cibotti for a 
Variance to subdivide the lot and constmct a single family 
home on the newly created lot in violation of Title 17 as 
amended Chapter 17.20.060.C (dimensional requirements) 
on the premises numbered 329 ADAMS STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
1/10/08, 1/17/08 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 08-003 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
JANUARY 29, 2008, at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Kai Lin Huang for a 
Variance to enclose first floor porch and extend an enclosed 
porch over first floor porch in violation of Title 1 7 as amended 
Chapter 17.20.040 (dimensional requirements) on the pre- 
mises numbered 69 APPLETON STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
1/10/08.1/17/08 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 07E0118-PP1 

To My ThI Tran of Quincy 
in said County, Washington 
Mutual Bank of Stockton in 
the State of California, re- 
spondents; and to all other 
persons interested. 

A petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court by 
James H. Warren of Quincy 
in the County, of Norfolk rep- 
resenting that he holds as 
tenant in common an undi- 
vided part or share of certain 
land lying in Quincy in said 
County of Norfolk and briefly 
described as follows: 

That certain parcel with 
buildings thereon situated in 
Quincy, being shown as Lot 
484 on Bowdoin Street, as 
shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Wollaston Land 
North Addition, Quincy, 
Mass." dated April 1924, 
Whitman and Howard Civil 
Engineers, recorded with 
Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1626. Page 
601, and bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY by 
Bowdoin Street. Fifty (50) 
feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by 
Lots 483 and 482 as shown 
on said Plan, One Hundred 
Fifteen (115) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by 
portion of Lots 481 and 467 
as shown on said Plan, Fifty 
(50) feet; and 

NORTHWESTERLY by 
Lots 466 and 465 as shown 
on said Plan, One Hundred 
Fifteen (115) feet. 

Containing 5,750 square 
feet, according to said Plan. 

Setting forth that he desire 
that - all - of said land may 
be sold at private sale for not 
less than four hundred thou- 
sand ($400,000) dollars and 
praying that partition may be 
made of all the land aforesaid 
according to law, and to that 
end that a commissioner be 
appointed to make such par- 
tition and be ordered to make 
sale and conveyance of all, 
or any part of said land which 
the Court finds cannot be 
advantageously divided, ei- 
ther at private sale or public 
auction, and be ordered to 
distribute the net proceeds 
thereof. 

If you desire to object 
thereto, you or your attorney 
should file a written appear- 
ance in said Court at Norfolk 
Probate Court, 35 Shawmut 
Road, Canton, MA before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fourth day of February 2008, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
twenty-sixth day of Decem- 
ber 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register 
1/17,1/24,1/31/08 



kVa'%'k'h*'hU-< 



• Ik'h ^ 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

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Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

Theiyial Court 

ProtMte and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P3093AD 
In the Estate of 
WENDY JEAN OICKLE 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
August 10,2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF ADMINISTRATOR 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that MILES 
OICKLE of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK and 
MARY COULIMORE of 
WHITMAN in the County of 
PLYMOUTH or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
administrator of said estate to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

FEBRUARY g. 2008- 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, December 
27, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/17/08 

LEQAL Notice 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 
Docket No. 07D1604-DV1 

DIVORCE/SEPARATE 

SUPPORT SUMMONS 

BY PUBLICATION 

HANG MYNU TON. 

Plaintiff(s) 

VHOANG TAN TRAN. 
Defendant(s) 

To the above named 
Defendant(s): 

A Complaint has been pre- 
sented to this Court by the 
Plaintiff(s) HANG MYNU 
JQH, seeking DIV OR CE- 

An Automatic Restraining 
Order has been entered in 
this matter preventing you 
from taldng any action which 
would negatively impact the 
current financial status of any 
party. Please refer to Supple- 
mental Probate Court Rule 
411 for more information. 

You are required to serve 
upon ATTORNEY VY H. 
TRUONG . whose address is 
985 DORCHESTER AV- 
ENUE. DORCHESTER. MA 
02125 . your answer on or 
before 3/20/08 . If you fail to 
do so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and adjudica- 
tion of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at 
CANTON 

WITNESS, DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN . Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at CAN- 
TON this 17^ day. Decem- 
ber. 2007 . 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of ProtMte Court 
1/3. 1/10. 1/17/08 



Ptfc26 Thm Owtnoy giaa. Thiinday^JaiiiiarylT.lOM 




'^^,... 






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A^^ 



WKTT^T^^wyZ^yyyZ^. 



^"^^y^A 



m^y. 




1^9 



'\ 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALE 

10" Craftsman table saw 

12" Bench band saw $125.00 

New Router & Router Table 

with 12 router bits all three 

still in box, never used 

New 35-piece 

router bits $ 1 75.(X) 

617-479-4631 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



WANTED 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



1998CAMAROLT1 

ENGINE 

with Transmission and 

All Components. 
28,000 miles -$1750 
Call 781-585-9834 ,, 



GE SELF CLEANING 
Glass Cooktop 

white stove with a gray 

glass cooktop. Good 

condition. $75 or best offer. 

Call 617-479-5294 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ADVERTISING 

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contact Latifa Sanchez 
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Visit our website: 
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CALL DOES IT ALL! 

AUTOMOBILES 

DONATE YOUR VE- 
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vacation voucher Do- 
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For Listings Call 800- 
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FALL 4f 

CLEAN-UPS 

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FOR RENT 



Single House, 

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parking, hardwood floors, 

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$1400, 1st + security. 

No utilities included, gas heat 

781-664-0569 "^ 



MISCELLANEOUS 



BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY 

ALL CASH CANDY 
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HELP WANTED 

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HOMES FOR RENT 
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Forth* Holiday! 

To have your free estimates call 

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We have good references!!! 2/21 



QUINCYSUN 

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617-471-3100 



HELP WANTED 




Reaching People 
Changing Lives 



BayCo¥e 

Human Services 



Ray Cwe Human Services, a private, rxM-fbr-profk 
corporation, provides a wide variety of sen/ices to those 
living with mental illness, addiction disorders or 
developmental disabilities. 



Clinical Director 

Location: Quincy 

40 hours, Monday-Friday; ory-call after hours 

• Provide clinical supervision for a thirty-bed, dual diagnosis 
detoxification unit 

• Hire, train, supervise and evaluate the Case t^lanagement team 

• Provide necessary training to obtain best practice approach 

• Supervise treatment planning and discharge planning 

• Conduct daily clinical rounds 

• Oversee day-to-day operations in the absence of the Program 
Director 

• Master's in social work or related field with licensing in MA with 
at least two years supervisory experience 

• Minimum two years experience in substance abuse or mental 
health field 

• Thorough knowledge of dual diagnosis 

• Driver's license required 

To apply, please send resumes to: Bay Cove Human Services, 

HR Dept.. 66 Canal St., Boston, MA 02 1 1 4; 

Fax: (6 1 7) 37 1 -3 1 00; or emaul: recruiter@baycove.org 

For more information or other job opportunities, 




MISCELLANEOUS 






rooms From $199/mo! 
5%dn,20yrs@8%!For 
Listings Call 800-559- 
4145XT170 

HOUSES FOR SALE 

5bd 3ba FORECLO- 
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More 1-4 bedrooms 
Available! 4% down, 20 
years @ 8%! For Listings 
Call, 800-559-4145 
XS950 

LOTS AND ACREAGE 

FORECLOSURES, 
REPO'S & LIQUIDA- 
TIONS! 10 acres -Views 

- was $59,900, NOW 
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Barns - was $149,900, 
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- Lake - was $225,000, 
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clear title, g'teed build- 
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MISCELLANEOUS 

SAWMILLS from only 
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sawmill. Log skidders 
also available 

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500A FREE Informatkw: 
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500-A 



Quincy, MA 

617.792.9884 

Call Now & Save 
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ROOFING • SUING • WINDOWS • MMTIN6 • CARPENTRY 

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*= SNOW REMOVAL 




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1/31 



Basement Restoration Services 
Quincy, MA 



Wet or damp basements? Got Mold? 



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• Demolition and Clean Outs 

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1/17 



MISCELLANEOUS 



formation 
2236 



1-888-542- 



MORTGAGES 

REVERSE MORT- 
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HOMEOWNERS! No 
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Call Frank Costa 1-800- 
974-4846 x229. Conti- 
nental Funding, 
Stoughton MA. www.cfc- 
reversemortgage.com 

REAL ESTATE 

NC MOUNTAINS 2 
acres with great view, 
very private, big trees, 
waterfalls & large public 
lake nearby, $69,500 call 



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now 866-789-8535 

ADIRONDACK - BASS 
LAKE 19 Acres - 
$59,900 Beautiful wood- 
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2 2 9-7843 
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FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION 
BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX DM EACH COLUMN 
[ ]1 YEAR DSf QUINCY $25.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



iiiirsdky~/iiinaju7i7, !SMi 



i» 



rt27 




HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE R BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 
Rentals for all Occasions 
617-472-6234 
617-479-2254 ^ 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

120Quarry St.. Quincy 

Call now to book your Party 

and other Special Events 

617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOI.com tf 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

Call for Details 

617-770-4876 

Small Weddings • Showers 

Christenings • Meetings 



TF 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 

HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 

Kitchen Facilities available 

Contact: Functions Manager 

617-479-6149 

TF 



FUNCTION FACILITY 
QUINCY YACHT CLUB 

1310 Sea St., Quincy 

Beautiful Bay Views 

Full Bar & Kitchen 

Handicap Equip 

617-471-6136 1/24 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves, 

machinist, and sheetmetal tools, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections: old postcards, toys, 

military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Davistownmuseum.org 

e-Store & antique sale! tf 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FAMILY BIBLE 

Seeking whereabouts of Welsh 

bible for THOMAS family - possibly 

given to Masonic/Rural Lodge in 

Quincy/Wollaston in the 1930s. 

Info - please call 

412-841-7531 (Pittsburgh, PA) 

1/31 



BEECHWOODONTHEBAY 

needs one teacher "aide" 

to assist teachers & assistant 

teachers in Center's Toddler 

Program. Hours: 1-5 

Call 617-471-5712 



1/17 



VOLLEYBALL CO-ED 

Adults 40+ 
Wednesdays llam-12:30pm 

Beechwood on the Bay 
440 E. Squantum St, Quincy 

CaU (617) 471-5712 „„ 



PAINTING BY PROFESSIONAL 

Interior & Exterior 

Power Washing & Carpentry 

All Types of House Repairs 

Reasonable Price 

Small Jobs Welcome 

Leave Message 617-773-4761^ 



IMAGE 
IMPROVEMENT 

LAMDSCAPIiyQ 
SINCE 1972 

We Clean It.., Trim 
It... Remove It 

No Job Too Big 
or Too Small 
^^L Free Estimates 
^^9 Fully Insured 

617-471-0044 



PUNO TUNING & 
REPAIR SERVICE 

Susan Burgess, 

Certified Piano Technician 
AsMidate Member of the 
Piano l^hnkians Guild 

781-335-2227 '"» 
email; swburgess@verizon.net 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 

Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 

617-251-6242 . 



SNOW RLOWnG 

Commef^^Msidential 




1/10 



DeFrancesco Construction 

Specializing In: REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 
ROOFING - TRIM - GUTTERS - VINYL SIDING 

CaU Today for a quick, FREE Estimate 

or No Hassle Information 

617-365-1444 

30 Year Guarantee on All Workmanship 



Fully Licensed & Insured 



THOMAS C. SWEENEY 

Smaller Jobs a Specialty 

44 Years Experience 

Carpentry, Siding, Painting, Porches 

VinylAVindows, Doors, 

Roofing, Declung, Steps 

License #1373 Free Estimates 

Reliable 617-825-1210 References 



HOME SWEET HOME 
REAL ESTATE 

Fran Lawlor • Quincy, MA 

617-328-9952 

Cell 617-314-3788 



2n 



A GUTTBI GLEANM CO. 

Professional Replacement, 
Cleaning & Repair 

Powerwash 

Graffiti Removal 

(781)844-2287 



4/10 



LOCAL PAINTER 

Average Room - walls 2 coats $ 1 50 

Ceilings 2 coats $75 - paints 
included. Also windows, doors, etc. 
Inside or out. Prompt, clean service. 

Kevin 781-331-5392 
CeU 508-221-1447 ^,^ 



MISCELLANEOUS 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 

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MA Reg. #101376 tf 



SAVE 

Budi^et Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 




Sump Pumps 

Sales • Services 
Installations 



617-224-3725 
Fax:617-770-3462 tf 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating, Gas Fitting 
Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 
Emergencies 617-792-4054 

Master Lie #13749 tf 



TF 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLUMBING, HEATING & AC 

Specializing in Viessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 

MAl,ic.#10S«9 VI3 



SERVICES 



KEPumatms 

JMOC OF AU TRAMS 

Senior Citizen Discounts 

Call Jack 617-773-4761 

2/7 



LA W FQRP P IU IVI PI N <? 
& HOME REPAIRS 

Small Jobs • Faucet Repairs 

• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals Installed 

• Minor Carpentry 

• Tile & Grout Repairs 
• Baseboard & Radiator 

Steam Cleaning 

24 Hour Service 
Master Lie. ^7306 

781-817-5434 tf 




Hancock 
TV. & Appliance 

Sales, Service, 
Parts & Installation 

Since 1945 

(617)472-1710 

1 1 5 Franklin Street, 
Quincy, MA 

hancocktvandappliance.com 



*YARD WORK CO.* 

• Lawn Mowing Service 

• Every 2 weeks or 3 times a month 

• Rental Properties welcome 

• SPRING CLEANUPS 

• Mulch Work 

• Expert Hedge and Bush Trimming 

• Serving Quincy for 20 Years 

Call Bill Fielding 
617-471-6124 




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GUTTERS CLEANED & INSTALLED 

CHIMNEY FLASHING & POINTING 

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3/6 



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* Decks and Porches Built OR Repaired 

* Front OR Back Steps Repaired OR Replaced 

* Replacement Windows Installed 

* Garages Repaired 

* Vinyl Siding Installed OR Repaired 

* Wood Shingles Repaired 

* Kitchen Cabinets Installed 

* Expert Carpenter ! ! 

INSURED. MASS. UC. # CS086I29 

CALL BOB BLAKE - 617-471-6124 



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Specializing in Customer 
Satisfaction. Perfection Guaranteed 

Call Pauly 
1-774-273-0406 



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Service, inc. 

Commercial 

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Call 617-328-9451 

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RETAIL SALES PERSON 

Full or Part Time 






1372 Hancock Street, Quincy 

617-471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 

□ Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

G Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
G Antiques 

G Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 
G Daycare 
G Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



RATES 
IWEEK 



□ 



$8.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 
1 00 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $7.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ $6.75 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

13 WEEKS 
OR MORE [ 



G Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



$6.50 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: FRTOAY AT 4PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Page 28 



nmridliy, JiBury 17, 2MC 



Ringing The Bell For The Salvation Army 




NORFOLK COUNTY District Attorney WUIiam Keating and CITY CLERK Joseph Shea and John Gillis, Norfolk County ralPH YOKE, president South Shore YMCA and Sue Harris, 
state Senator Michael Morrlssey. commissio ner and former city clerk. president of Quincy CoUege. (Maralin Manning Photos) 




KKIIAKI) (;()K\1LKV. president Quincy Business Associa- 
tion and vice president S(»verei};n Bank; Kdward Keohane, 
chsiirnian Quincy Partnership and owner Keohane Funeral 
llonu's; and Dean Ki/./o, executive director of Quincy 2000 
Collaborative. 

Other Photos On Pa^es 14 and 15 








JAY DAVIS, new City Council president and Doug Gutro, 
former council president. 



NORFOLK COUNTY Register of Probate Patrick McDermott, 
Maralin Manning, executive director Quincy Business Associa- 
tion, and School Committeeman Kevin Mulvey. 



New And Expanded Website At Quincy Medical Center 



Quincy Medical Center 
has a new 153-page website 
with 60 |x.'r cent more con- 
tent, an expanded directory 
t>t nn)re than 2{M) physicians 
and a section written in 
Cantonese. 

The new website also in- 



cludes a guide to help pa- 
tients during their stay at 
QMC. information about the 
hospital's clinical and medi- 
cal services, a section for 
"out of town" visitors and a 
continually updated news 
and events section. 



New navigation in the 
physician directory enables 
viewers to select a physician 
by name, location, specialty, 
gender or language spoken. 

The website was installed 
by the public relations and 
marketing firm of Smith & 



Suita, Inc., and is available 
at www.quincymc.org. 

"Today's patients often 
research their health care 
choices on the Internet be- 
fore deciding on a medical 
facility or health care pro- 
vider," said Janice Sullivan, 



director of marketing and 
public relations at QMC, 

"Our new Quincy Medi- 
cal Center website makes it 
quick and simple for people 
to obtain the information 
they need to make intelligent 
health care choices. 



"The website is often the 
patient's first contact and our 
new site is so customer 
friendly with engaging visu- 
als, it also communicates our 
professional and compas- 
sionate approach to caring 
for patients and their fami- 
lies." 



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GET $100 IN GAS. 



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.1 



I 



Sad News: 
Abigail's Crossing Closing March 31 

■ Page9- 







^11 



Tlxe Quizicy 



Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL.40 No. 19 



Thursday, January 24, 2008 



500 




COYOTE PACK is making its home in tlie Squantum marslies 
not 100 feet from the upscale condos in Marina Bay. Two pups 



are missing from this family portrait taken by Steve Dunleavy 
of Schooner Lane. 



Koch 'Committed' 
To Peace In Dept. 

'Progress' 
On Police 
Problem 



'They're Getting Closer And Bolder' 

Coyote Pack Haunts 
Marina Bay Condos 



A pack of five brazen coy- 
otes, a father and four off- 
spring, are haunting the 
Squantum marshes not far 
from the upscale condos at 
Marina Bay. 

"The pack has been here 
for a couple of years," said 
Steve Dunleavy, who lives 
on Schooner Lane. "You can 
see them not 50 or 100 teet 
from the house. 

"Each year they get 
bolder and closer. You used 
to be able to shoo them away 
but now they just stand there 
and look at you. Each year 



they're a little less afraid." 

Dunleavy's concern is for 
Beacon and Sparkle, his two 
cats, prime targets on which 
a suburban coyote can pol- 
ish his or her hunting skills. 
"We don't let Sparkle 
out," he said. "It's too dan- 
gerous. But Beacon is the 
kind that has to go out. We 
don't let her out at night but 
now the coyotes are around 
during the day, too." 

Originally, there were six 
members of the pack but one 
of them vanished a short time 
ago. Dunleavy thinks it's the 



mother, who was reddish in 
color while the others are 
gray. 

"They look very healthy," 
said Dunleavy. "They have 
nice fur and they certainly 
are not starving. You can see 
the pups playing in the snow 
and jumping on each other. 

The pups appear to have 
been bom last March or April 
and are just now coming into 
their own as hunters. 

Dunleavy has found that 
there is very httle that can 
be done about coyotes in 
suburbia. 



"My wife talked to the 
animal officer," he said. "He 
gave her a brochure that 
warns you not to feed them 
and maybe you can scare 
them away by banging pots 
and pans. 

"In theory, you can hunt 
them but you can't shoot a 
gun within 300 feet of a 
house in Quincy. 

"You can't trap them, ex- 
cept in a box trap and Mas- 
sachusetts law does not al- 
low you to take a wild ani- 
mal in one place and trans- 
port it to another." 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The "temporary truce" 
between Police Chief Robert 
Crowley and the patrolmen's 
union has entered its second 
week amid hints that some 
progress is being made to- 
ward a settlement. 

'The mayor has met with 
both sides once," said Chris- 
topher Walker, the policy di- 
rector in Mayor Tom Koch's 
administration. "It's safe to 
say that there is some 
progress." 

"I am committed to lead- 
ing on this issue," said Koch. 
"I am committed to resolv- 
ing the issues within our Po- 
lice Department. 

"I am committed to ensur- 
ing that our residents get the 
level of public safety they 
expect and deserve." 

Other than that, both 
Crowley and Bruce Tait, 



president of the Quincy Po- 
lice Patrol Officers Associa- 
tion, as well as the mayor 
remained close mouthed 
about any movement in the 
long-standing feud. 

"The mayor is fully en- 
gaged," said Walker. "We're 
not talking about results." 

Is another meeting sched- 
uled? 

"No comment," said 
Walker. 

Tait's blog, qppoa.com, 
the source of many vitriolic 
comments about the chief 
that eventually reached the 
media, was closed to the 
public as part of the truce. 

The feud between 
Crowley and Tait dates back 
to a personal dispute at a time 
even before they became 
police chief and union presi- 
dent respectively. 

(Cont'd On Page 13} 



Penn St. - Burgin Parkway Site McFarlaild Named 

Davis Calls Meeting On Proposed To Head Norfolk 
Lowe's Home Improvement Center Aggie High School 



City Council President Jay 
Davis has scheduled a 
neighborhood meeting 
Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m., 
to discuss proposed plans for 
construction of a Lowe's 
Home Improvement Center 
along Burgin Parkway and 
Penn Street. 

Lowe's plans, also, 
involve relocating and 
reconfiguring Grasso Park on 
Columbia Street and the use 
of a portion of Penn Street. 

The meeting will be held 

llllllil 



according to Davis, the Ward 
4 city councillor. 

Specific details on the 
proposal are not finalized, 
according to a Lowe's 
spokesperson, Karen Cobb, 
who said the company would 
not have any comment at this 
time. 

However, company 

representatives have met with 

local officials and will 

JAY DAVIS address neighborhood 

at the Ward 4 Neighborhood concerns, according to Davis 

Center, 100 Brooks Ave., who considers the retailer's 




project will be a major plus 
for the city. 

Lowe's presence would 
add "a strong commercial 
base that will increase our 
tax base," said Davis who 
noted the home improvement 
business would bring good 
jobs and easy access to 
Lowe's for Quincy residents. 
In addition, he said the 
structure would be union- 
buih. 

"The closest Lowe's is in 

(Cont'd On Page 28) 



At Large City Councillor 
Michael McFarland has been 
named suj)erintendent-direc- 
tor of the Norfolk County 
Agricultural High School 
where he has been business 
manager for the past six 
years. 

McFarland, who will as- 
sume his new post July 1, 
said his new job should not 
effect his work on the City 
Council, to which he was 
elected to a second two-year 

(Cont'd On Page 13) 




MIKE McFarland 



Remembering MLK - ?a^^ 2 ■ Flood Relief Coming To Sixth Ave. -Page 3 



Fife 2 ThmQvJbmay 



H 



350 Mark King 's Birthday 



Bell Says Voters 

Key To Democracy, 

Human Rights 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

vSome 350 persons gave 
civil rights activist Ron Bell 
a standing ovation at North 
Quincy High School Mon- 
day after he descnbed how 
he helped register40,(XK) new 
voters in Boston through the 
"The Power of a Dream." 

Speaking at the 12th An- 
nual Martin Luther King, Jr., 
Breakfast Celebration, Bell 
said that a nightmare came 
first, and, then hisdream, then 
rejection, failure, and, finally 
a whopping success. 

However, Bell warned the 
audience, as did other speak- 
ers, that much work must still 
be done and vigilance is es- 
sential. 

Dist. Atty. William 
Keating sounded an alarm, 
stating that more and more 
elementary and middle 
school youngsters are in- 
volved in human rights vio- 
lations. 

Later, award recipient 
Alden Poole reminded lis- 
teners that King's message 
w as one of non-violence and 
peace and the C'nited States 
.;s at war t)nce again. 

"Dreams are essential. 
Dreams are what make us get 
up in the morning and go out 
into the world. Dreams are 
what inspire us and fuel our 
imagination." said Bell, the 
keynote speaker for the event 
organized by the Quincy 
Human Rights Commission 




KEYNOTE SPEAKER Ron 
Bell, the governor's Director 
of Civic Engagement, got a 
standing ovation at Quincy 's 
12th Annual Martin Luther 
King Breakfast. 

(HRC). 

Bell had the audience re- 
sponding with "Amens" and 
"Dunk the Vote" as he de- 
scribed his dream of increas- 
ing voter registration across 
the country. 

Bell said his voter drive, 
"Dunk the Vote," was first 
shaped by the Charles Stuart 
case when black men were 
humiliated in Boston. 

In that 1989 case, the 
killet-busband. . Stuart 
charged that a black man 
killed his 30-year-old preg- 
nant wife as she left child- 
birth classes at a Boston hos- 
pital. Police believed him. 

At the time. Bell was the 
27-year-old Director of the 
Mission Hill Community 
Center and he witnessed, day 
after day, the public degra- 
dation of young men. 



"Even today, I can remem- 
ber black men being strip- 
searched in front of the Cen- 
ter, in complete violation of 
their civil rights. This whole 
experience reminded me of 
what it meant to be black in 
Boston," said Bell. 

In spite of naysayers and 
rejection from others in the 
community. Bell began a 
voter registration drive. 

The drive sputtered at the 
outset because "the men 
whose civil rights were be- 
ing violated, were not com- 
ing out to register, so I had to 
think of another way of bring- 
ing them together. I came up 
with a basketball tourna- 
ment." 

"Dunk the Vote" then took 
off because, in order to play, 
each participant had to be a 
registered voter. 

"Why did I want to take 
on that kind of challenge?" 
Bell asked, citing friends who 
outright rejected both him 
and his project. Bell then 
quoted Dr. King who said, 

"The ultimate measure of 
a man is not where he stands 
in moments of comfort and 
convenience, but where he 
stands at times of challenge 
and controversy." 

Voters are essential to a 
free and democratic society 
that is committed to equality 
and human rights, said Bell 
who warned that, right now, 

(Cont'd On Page 10) 




THREE QUINCY RESIDENTS, Dr. Joseph McDermott and Janet and Alden Poole, were 
honored for their work on behalf of human rights. From left are City Cowicil President Jay Davis, 
Mayor Thomas Koch, Elizabeth McDermott who accepted the award on behalf of her husband, 
Alden Poole, Janet Poole, Norfolk County Dist Atty. William Keattaig and Ron Bell, the 
governor's Director of Civic Engagement Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 




HUNDREDS JOINED HANDS Monday to smg *<We ShaU Overcome," at the city's 12tfa annual 
Marthi Luther Kmg, Jr. Breakfast Celebration at North Quincy High School. Among the smgers 
were Dist Atty. William Keating and City Council President Jay Davis (fourth and fifth from 
left). 




SEVENTEEN YOUNGSTERS from Germantown Neighborhood Center spoke of the dream of 
Martin Luther Kmg and of human dignity at Monday's Martfai Luther King, Jr. Breakfast 



i 



Dr. Freedman has been so touched by your 
love and support of her new baby girl. 

Cecelia!! 

As a thank you she is having a 

I^ATIENT APPRECIATION DAY!! 

On Thursday, January 31st 

The Family Practice of Chiropractic 

will be offering: 

Complimentary adjustments 
for our existing patients. 

Also, bring in your friends and family for a 
complimentary computerized foot or spine scan. 

Call today to reserve your appointment! 

10:00 - 12:00 

or 

3:00 - 6:30 

Family Practice of Chiit^ractic 

Dr. Gabrieile Freedman 

Chiropractic Care for Children and Adults 

112 McGrath Hi^way 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-4200 



The secret 
to a great 

Ufef 




A wonderful home, loving £amily, 
and the time to enfcy it all! 

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pu n iCY • 617-471-2600 



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Thursday, Janiuiy 24, 2008 ZlwQuliMi^.Siiui P)we3 



Annual 15% Discount 



Gutro Ordinance Would 

Give Seniors Break 

On Water Bills 



senior citizens and low 
income homeowners in 
Quincy, beset by high costs 
of health care and energy, 
would get a break on their 
water and sewer bills under 
an ordinance proposed by 
Ward 5 City Councillor 
Doug Gutro Tuesday night. 

The measure would give 
seniors over 65 and low in- 
come homeowners a 15 per 
cent annual discount on wa- 
ter and sewer bills, a savings 
similar to that enjoyed by 
residents of 23 communities 
in the MWRA district. 

"This initiative is long 
overdue here in Quincy," 
said Gutro. 

"Our seniors, many of 
whom are on fixed incomes, 
continue to face unrelenting 
increases in health care, pre- 
scription drugs and energy 
costs while a slowing 
economy diminishes their 
nest eggs. 

"Our seniors and low in- 
come families deserve a 
break and this discount in 
water and sewer bills will 




DOUG GUTRO 

provide that relief to those in 
our community who have 
long called Quincy their 
home, yet struggle to make 
ends meet." 

Gutro estimated that 
slightly more than 3,500 
over-65 and low-income 
households would be eligible 
for the discount. Each would 
save $100 annually, he said. 

Eligible seniors would be 
those who have reached their 
65th birthday prior to the fis- 
cal year with no income or 
asset requirements. 

Low income households 
would be those whose total 



income does not exceed 80 
per cent of the median in- 
come in Norfolk County as 
reported by the Department 
of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment. 

Gutro's proposal calls for 
applications to be filed by 
April 1 , 2008, with discounts 
taking effect in water and 
sewer charges billed on and 
after July 1,2008. 

Under the ordinance, se- 
nior applicants must have 
been residents of Massachu- 
setts for the preceding 10 
years, owned and occupied 
the residence for five years 
or be the surviving spouse 
who inherits the property and 
otherwise qualifies. 

Eligible residents would 
be entitled to a 15 per cent 
discount for a single family 
residence, 7.5 per cent for a 
two-family residence, 5 per 
cent for a three-family resi- 
dence and nothing for any 
other building. 

Gutro's proposed ordi- 
nance was sent to committee 
for hearing. — «^» 




ENGINEERING CONTRACT toucUng off flood reUef project on Sixth Avenue, Quincy Point, 
is signed by Mayor Tom Kocli wliile Ward 2 City Councillor Daniel Raymondi looks on. 

Christopher Walker photo 

Initial $50,000 Contract Signed 

Flood Relief In Sight 
For Sixth Avenue Homes 



Ward 5 Democrats To Caucus Feb. 2 

Registered Democrats in nace Brook Parkway. Delegates will be divided 

Ward 5 will hold a caucus They will elect 10 del- equally between men and 

Saturday, Feb. 2 at 10 a.m. egates and two alternatives women. The caucus is open 

in the media center of the to the 2008 Massachusetts to all registered Democrats 

Charles A. Bemazzani El- Democratic Convention, in Ward 5. 
ementary School, 701 Fur- 



Relief from chronic 
flooding is finally coming to 
harried residents of Sixth 
Avenue in Quincy Point. 

Mayor Tom Koch signed 
a $50,000 contract with the 
engineering firm of Weston 
and Sampson to begin drain- 
age improvements on the 
street. 

"It's great news that we're 
finally moving forward," 
said Ward 2 City Councillor 
Daniel Raymondi. 

"We've identified a de- 
sign and we're moving for- 
ward with that design. I ap- 
preciate the mayor's efforts 
in getting this project going. 
Hopefully we can start con- 
struction in a matter of 
months." 

The contract calls for en- 



gineering to relocate an 800- 
foot drainage pipe and to re- 
direct storm run-off away 
from the backyards of Sixth 
Avenue homes. 

Raymondi called the 
flooding a constant problem 
"for several decades." 

"Councillor Raymondi 
has been a tireless advocate 



for this neighborhood and 
this project and I'm proud 
we're finally getting the ball 
rolling," said Koch. 

"I look forward to work- 
ing with Councillor 
Raymondi and all of our 
councillors on projects like 
these throughout the city." 



Steven R. Striffler 

Attorney At Law 



•CONSTRUCTION 
•REAL ESTATE 
•FORECLOSURE 



268 Summer St., Ste 300 

Boston, MA 02210 

617-290-1573 



www.strifflerlaw.com 




ATRIA MARINA PLACE 



,inJ .A^sisK'J 



Don^t let weather 
ruin your winter. * 



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^ temperatures and icy weather, enjoy all 
the comforts of home at Atria Marina 

Place. We offer delicious meals, a 

busy activities calendar, housekeeping 

services, laundry, and local transportation. 



But that's not all. Move in by January 3 1 
and receive one month's free rent! 



Start enjoyir^ winter again. 
CaU, today to schedule a tour! 




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ATRJA MARINA PLACE 

Four Seaport Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 | uAvw.atriamarinaplace.covn 

Residency tenns and a^jreements apply. Valid for new residents 

only. Must become a resident by January 3 1 , 2008, to receive 

special offer. Call Andrea Langone, Community Sales Director 

for complete details. Not valid with any oOier oflfiers. 

■lS» " 735J20615 




1-YEAR CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT 

Looking for a high-yielding investment that's safe and guaranteed? 

Make a Certificate of Deposit from Colonial Federal part of your 

sensible, diversified investment strategy. You get a great rate and 

your money is insured by the FDIC. Other rates & terms are available. 

Come see us. Or call Betty or Linda at 617-471-0750. 

COLONIAL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 

"Your neighborhood bank!" 

QUINCY: 15 Beach Street 617-471-0750 • 1000 Southern Artery (Residents only) 617-479-1430 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin Street 781-767-1776 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Middle & Washington Streets 781-331-1776 • www.colonialfed.com 




$1000 minimum opening deposit and to obtain suted APY. Annual Percenuge Yield (APY) 
accurate as of 01/16/08 and subjea to change. Penalty for early withdrawal. 



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Insured FDIC 



24» 



^KiaJLa&oar 




USPS 453^)60 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy. MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr., Publisher 

Robert H. Bosworth, Editor 

50e per copy. $25.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $38.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage pakl at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancocit St.. Quincy MA 02169 

Tha Quincy Sun asaumM no financial rMponwbtWy tor typographical errors in 
actveriiMments Ixit wM rapnnt that part of an advartlMment in which tfie typographical 
arror occur*. 



4-3 Moments 
intime 




THEHlSTORyCBANNE 



• On Jan. 26, 1788, the 

first 736 convicts banished 
from England to Australia 
land in Botany Bay. Over the 
next 60 years, approximate- 
ly 50.000 criminals were 
transported. Among the first 
group was a 70-year-old 
woman who had stolen 
cheese to eat. 

• On Jan. 24, 1860, French 
inventor Etienne Lenoir is 
issued a patent for the first 
successful internal-combus- 
tion engine. Lenoir's engine 
was a converted steam 
engine that bumed coal gas. 

• On Jan. 27, 1888, the 
National Geographic Soci- 
ety is founded in Washing- 
ton. D.C. National Geo- 
graphic magazine quickly 
became known for its stun- 
ning and pioneering photog- 
raphy, being the first to print 
natural-color photos of sky. 
sea and the North and South 
Poles. 

• On Jan. 25, 1926, the 
Central Casting Corporation 
opens. The company provid- 
ed pools of extras for film 
production. By 1929, more 
than 1 7,000 extras were reg- 
istered with the bureau. 



Dean Switzer, the actor who 
as a child played "Alfalfa" in 
the Our Gang comedy film 
series, dies at age 31 in a 
fight, allegedly about mon- 
ey. Alfalfa, the freckle-faced 
boy with a warbling singing 
voice and a cowlick protrud- 
ing from the top of his head, 
was Switzer's best-known 
role. 

• On Jan. 23, 1968, th 

U.S. intelligence-gathering 
ship Pueblo is seized by 
North Korean naval vessels 
and charged with spying and 
violating North Korean ter- 
ritorial waters. Negotiations 
to free the 8 3 -man crew of 
the U.S. ship dragged on for 
nearly a year. 

• On Jan. 22, 1973, the 
Supreme Court decriminal- 
izes abortion by banding 
down its decision in the case 
of Roe V. Wade. For most of 
the country's first 100 years, 
abortion was not a criminal 
offense. Abortion only 
became a criminal offense in 
the period between 1 860 and 
1880 when the American 
Medical Association decid- 
ed that abortion practition- 
ers were unwanted competi- 
tion. 



• On Jan. 21, 1959, Carl e 200e King Features Synd.. inc. 



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QUlNa ANIMAL SHELTER 

56 Broad Street, Quincy • 61 7-376- 1349 
quln€fanimalsli0Her,org 

IN'SHELTERADOFTION HOURS 

TUESDAY and THURSDAYS 6:00 to 8:00 pm \ 
SATURDAYS 10 am - 4 pm ^ 

Adoption fees indude initial vaccinations 
join/ Spof /Heater as needed, 100% volunteer runi 
new volunteers ahrap needed, 

FOR LOST or POUND ANIMALS call 

CITY OF QUINCY ANIMAL CONTROL 

at6l7'376'1364. 

AVAILABLE DOGS 

BEMULSy.o.ShihTzu. 
ULYlI y.o., very energetic. 
SAMANTHA; poodle mix 

WE HAVE LOTS OF KITTENS 
NEEDING GOOD HOMES f 
AVAILABLE CATS 
HORACE: 2 y.o. who loves beUy nibs. 
JESSIELYoung male, all black. 
MARINA: Female tabby. 
MARGARET: 5 y.o. pait Siamese. 
SASSAFRASS: Affectionate young tabby. 
SYLVESTER: S weet black and white. 6 y.o. 
TOOTSIE rwhite) A MIJFFIN (^vy\: Would lik^ | 

to be adc^)ted together. 

JKALDOlI 1/2 y.o. pUyfid & friendly. 

ZEI^LHandsome Maine Coon mix 2 y.o. 

I FosUr Paremis/Homes VrgemOy NeetM 



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I I s: 



By Henry Bosworth 



Those Mayoral Challenges 





TOBIN 



SHEETS 




BURGIN 



Don't know how many eventful challenges Tom 
Koch will face as mayor. 
Arthur Tobin had one -the Blizzard 
of '78-just after taking office. And 
brought Quincy through it with him. 
Jim Sheets spearheaded an around- 
the-clock, around-the-weeks, around- 
the-months effort to 
keep Quincy 

Hospital-now Quincy Medical Center- 
open. 

Hopefully for Koch and for all of 
US-he won't have to face challenges 
like that or the ones another mayor 
named Tom had to deal with. 
That was Tom Burgin. 
His tenure as mayor included part 
of the Great Depression, the 
Hurricane of 1938 and the days just 
after the attack on Pearl Harbor. 

He was elected mayor in 1935 at 
age 33 and re-elected to three more 
terms, his fourth without opposition. 
He was Quincy' s first mayor to 
win re-election unopposed (Frank 
McCauley, Sheets, William Phelan the other three). He 
left that fourth term in November 1942 to serve in the 
Navy during World War H. (He came back from the war 
to become a city councillor and mayor under Plan E.) 
Burgin reminisced a little about his years as mayor in 
this column in 1984: 

The Depression: "Some 10,000 people in Quincy 
were on relief rolls and another 1 ,8(X) on federal WPA 
and PWA projects. It was pathetic and I will never 
forget it." 

Hurricane Of 1938: "There were 3,900 trees down 
and all the fire alarm boxes and police (call) boxes were 
out of conunission. There was no electricity." 

Pearl Harbor Attack: Burgin rushed back from 
Cape Cod and went 72 hours without sleep readying the 
city for the war's demands. 

A day later, 1,700 troops arrived in Quincy and the 
city had to billet them by that night. 

"We had to conmiandeer Masonic halls. Knights of 
Colimibus halls, church halls-but we did it." 
His thoughts on other subjects: 
His Favorite Mayors: He was reluctant to name 
them but after some thought and 
prodding, he confided: 

"Of the recent ones, Jim Mclntyre. 
I was close to him. I thought the world 
of him." 

"In the early days I looked up to 
Perley Barbour and Joseph Whiton 
and had the highest regard for Charles 
Francis Adams." 

Biggest Change In City: 'The advent of the MBTA. 
It completely changed Quincy Square and Wollaston, 




McINTYRE 



Norfolk Downs, Atlantic and Quincy Adams." 

Favorite Acliievement: Surprisingly, it was not 
political but the YMCA building on Coddington Street. 
He was president of the YMCA when more than a $1 
million was raised to build it, the biggest fiindraiser at 
that time in the city's history. 

"I think that would stand as the greatest memorial 
anyone would want to leave-it's dedicated to youth." 

But there is another memorial. 

Renaming Upland Road to Honorable Thomas S. 
Burgin Parkway: 

"I was humbled. It was awfully nice of them to do it. 
How nice it is to give someone a pat on the back while 
he is here rather than send flowers later." 

And, how did he vision the Quincy of the future? 

"Quincy will go through a great change. It has been 
a residential city of houses but the apartments are 
coming. 

"There will be a great growth in the business 
community-a substantial change in residential. But our 
zoning will help. There will be no skyscrapers." 

Burgin died in 1986 at age 83. 

No Quincy mayor served during more challenging 
times. 

G 

YOU'RE A YOUNG old-timer if you can remember 
the Presidents John and John Quincy Adams birthplaces 
painted red. 

They were that color for some 80 years until the city 
turned them over to the U.S. National Park Service inn 
1979. 

Research, at the time, showed that Abigail Adams 
wanted the John Quincy Adams birthplace "stone" 
color and the John Adams birthplace white, as they 
where in 1807, the year the last member of the family 
lived there. 

Later research, however, indicated that the John 
Adams birthplace actually should be unpainted as it 
now is. 

Q 

QUINCY'S PAUL FELDMAN, who got his 
newspaper career start at The Sun, is 
now Foreign Editor of the Los Angles 
Times. 

He was recently invited to travel to 
North Korea with the Intemational 
Reporting Project. 

In an article on his impressions and 
observations he wrote: 

"It didn't take long to realize that although the 
impoverished North Korean government appears willing 
to open its doors slightly to earn much needed hard 
currency, it's willing to do so only on its own terms." 

Paul is the son of Marion Feldman Needel of Quincy 
and the late Jason Feldman who owned the popular 
Jason's Music and Luggage Shop on Hancock Street in 
Quincy Center. 

He was with The Sun in the 1970's. 




FELDMAN 



Energy Crisis Topic Of Library Forum Feb. 3 



The public is invited to a 
free National Issues Forum 
discussicHi (HI *The Eoergy 
Problem: Choices for an 
Uncertain Future" Sunday, 
Feb. 3. at 2:30 p.m. at the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary. 40 Washington St 



The non-partisan forum 
will provide citizens an op- 
portunity to gather, talk, lis- 
ten and learn of the threat to 
the American way of life 
dirough unstabte sources of 
energy in hopes of finding a 
workable solution. 



During tfie fonim, partici- 
pants will consider three pos- 
sible {^proaches to the prob- 
lem, reducing dependency 
OQ fcHeign energy, develop- 
ing non-fossil fi^l alterna- 
tives and reducing c(Hisumer 
demand for energy. 



Free booklets on the topic 
will be available for partici- 
pants prior to the forum. To 
register and obtain a bo<^- 
let, caU 617-376-1316 or e- 
mail qiirrf@ocin.org. 

The forum is sponsored 
by the Friends of the Thomas 
Crane Library. 



a 



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Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS POSTCARD of Bird Street in Houglis Necic was 
postmarlted in 1930, but it was published before 1920. 
Taken from near what is today's Edgewater Drive, the 
view is towards Macy Street, wliich crosses about six 
houses down. At the time of this picture, most of the 
cottages in Houglis Neck were still sununer residences. 
Most of those shown here have been somewhat altered 
over the years, some to gain a better advantage of their 
water views, but all are now year-round homes. The 
one on the right has been replaced. The street looks 



pretty narrow here and this section of Bird Street was 
accepted by the city in 1934, but is still only 33 feet wide. 
What appears to be a street across the foreground is 
misleading. There never was a street there. This is one 
of a series of black and white Houghs Neck picture post- 
cards that were artistically augmented by the publisher 
Charies A. Litchfield who lived in M errymount To con- 
tact Tom Galvin, e-mail tmgalvin@verizonjiet 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



TiiteWeek 
64 Years Ago 



Rkadkrs FORIM 



Police Department Issue Putting Safety At Risk 



Recent news reports have 
now confirmed what I have 
witnessed for many years- 
Quincy Police Department 
patrol officers sitting in their 
police cruisers parked in 
parldng lots reading newspa- 
pers and drinking coffee, not 
performing their jobs. Now 
that the Patrolmen's Union 
President Bruce Tait has pub- 
licly confirmed this, the se- 
cret is out. This is putting the 
safety of the City of Quincy 



at risk and must be stopped 
immediately! 

If Patrolmen's Union has 
a disagreement with Police 
Chief Crowley, then deal 
with it as professionals, not 
by shirking your job respon- 
sibilities. As long as their 
paycheck is issued by the 
City of Quincy and funded 
by the taxpayers, then do 
your job! If they fail to per- 
form their job, the officers 
should be disciplined like 



any other employee would 
be for failure to perform their 
job responsibiUties. Also, if 
they don't like working for 
Chief Crowley, then the op- 
tion to go find another job 
elsewhere is available to 
them. 

I would like to recognize 
those members of the Quincy 
Pobce Department who do 
an outstanding job each day, 
but we all know it only takes 
the actions of few to ruin it 



all! 

Mayor Koch, here is your 
first opportunity to show true 
leadership. Please address 
this issue with all parties and 
ensure public safety be- 
comes the number one pri- 
ority for the Quincy PoUce 
Department. Also, this can 
be a source of revenue in 
these days of increased fis- 
cal demands. 

Chris Meyers 
Filbert Street 



Senator Obama Special Person 



Presidential candidates, 
both Democratic and Repub- 
lican, are all anxious to serve 
America and the world in 
these troublesome times of 
history. All of them deserve 
our admiration and respect. 
The future U.S. President 
should include all of then in 
their Advisory Committee. 

I find Senator Barack 
Obama to be the best of the 
best. It is unforgettable that 
before he joined the U.S. 
Senate and without Washing- 
ton experience he was 
against the war on Iraq. 
Senator Hillary Chnton, 1 
cannot forget, was for war on 
Serbia and for war on Iraq. 

Senator Obama's father is 
from Kenya and his mother 
from Kansas. Thus he is the 
"Kenya, Kansas Kid." Sena- 
tor Obama is very special. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



But to describe a very spe- 
cial person, especially a spe- 
cial politician is an impos- 
sible task. The best we can 
do is to say that some spe- 
cial person resembles some 
other special person. 

If Senator Stewart 
Syminton had been Senator 
Barack Obama's contempo- 
rary, he would have used the 
same praise for him as he 



used for Senator John F. 
Kennedy: "Senator Barack 
Obama has something spe- 
cial that the rest of us do not 
have." 

Congressman Bill 
Delahunt was able to size up 
Senator Obama and endorse 
him before he waited for 
Iowa and New Hampshire to 
vote. Delahunt would be a 
very precious addition to 



Obama's cabinet. 

Senator Obama preaches 
the same ideology to his fel- 
low Americans and to his fel- 
low citizens of the world in- 
scribed in our money, "In 
God We Trust, E Pluribus 
Unum" - Unity in Diversity. 



Michael Jovanovic 
Town Hill St. 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■ I 

HLL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



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CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 

[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Carrier USS Hancock 
Launched At Shipyard 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

In the first launching of the year at the Fore River Shipyard, 
the USS Hancock, the last of a fleet of four aircraft carriers 
built her in Quincy since the war started, slid down the ways 

at Quincy 'S shipyard. mmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmmmmmm 

Mrs. DeWitt Clinton Ramsay, 
wife of Rear Admiral Ramsay, was 
the ship's sponsor. Governor 
Leverett Saltonstall and Mayor 
Charles A. Ross spoke at the 
launching. 

The Hancock was the sister ship to the second Wasp, the 
second Lexington and the Bunker Hill. 

MERCHANTS WAR BOND DINNER A SELLOUT 

The Jan. 25 War Bond Dinner sponsored by the Quincy 
Merchants Association at the Neighborhood Club, is a 
complete sellout. Patrick L. O'Malley, general chairman of 
the Quincy War Finance Committee, said, with applications 
for additional tickets being turned down. 

O'Malley also said that well-known actor Joel McCrea 
will attend the dinner. McCrea, one of Hollywood's most 
popular movie stars, will attend the dinner with his wife, 
movie actress Frances Dee. 

Tickets to the affair were obtained by the purchase of a 
$500 war bond. 

USE OF POLICE SURVEY 
PLEDGED BY COUNCILLORS 

Seven members of the City Council pledged themselves to 
use the Police Survey report as a guide in the proposed 
reorganization of the Quincy Police Department at a dinner 
meeting of the Quincy Taxpayers' Association. 

Councillors attending included Council President Frank 
Orcutt, William Jenness, Christian Burkard, Clifton Baker, 
Amelio Delia Chiesa, George McDonald and Carl Anderson. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

The' four Quincy service clubs were planning a joint 
meeting for Jan. 3 1 , to stimulate the purchase of war bonds. 
The conMiiittee included the following club presidents: 
George Bonsall, Rotary; Joseph Emmons, Lions; George 
Daley, Kiwanis; Samuel Coffman, Quintonas. . . Robert S. 
Fallon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth P. Fallon, 8 Park St., 
Quincy, has been promoted to the rank of first lieutenant in 
the US Army... William Morrison, principal of the 
Massachusetts Field School, was the guest speaker at a 
meeting of the school's Parent and Teachers Association. . . 
J. Everett Robie, owner of the Quincy Coal and Fuel 
Company, was re-elected to the board of directors of the 
Quincy Visiting Nurse Association. . . Claudette Colbert and 
Paulette Goddard were appearing in the movie "So Proudly 
We Hail" at the Adams Theater, School St., Quincy... The 
movie, "Sahara" starring Humphrey Bogart and Bruce 
Bennett, was playing at the Alhambra on Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. . . Julian E. MacDonnell, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest F. MacDonnell, Southern Artery, Quincy Point, 
was promoted to Radioman third class. Petty Officer 
MacDonnell is serving in the Pacific... A "Chart of 
Instructions" on how to bum bituminous coal was being 
given to Quincy residents by Granite Coal Co., 64 Penn St., 
South Quincy... Henry E. Conroy, son of Mrs. Margaret 
Conroy of 89 Pleasant St., South Quincy, was promoted to 
corporal in the United States Marine Corps. Cpl. Conroy 
enlisted in the Marines in June 1943... Shipbuilders' 
Cooperative Bank, 24 Granite Trust Building, announced 
that mortgage money was available for home buyers or those 
looking to refinance a present mortgage ... A group of teachers 
and parents of the Montclair Parent Teachers Association 
went to the Red Cross donor center, Boylston St., Boston, to 
donate blood. They included Helene Johnson, Bernice 
Thissell, Marion Kelley, Bettina Hilt Holdt, Mrs. Walter 
Parker, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mahn. . . Carroll's Cut 
Rate Store, 1419 Hancock St., Quincy Center, was advertising 
"Facial Tissues, Small Size, $.13, Large Size, $.15"... Staff 
Sergeant Phillip Posey, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip 
Posey, Sr., 72 Newbury Ave., North Quincy, has completed 
46 missions with the US Air Force in the European Theater 
of Operations... Twin sisters, Dorothy and Phyllis Bums, 
were installed at the recent installation meeting of the 
Wollaston Assembly, Order of the Rainbow. Dorothy was 
installed as worthy advisor of the Assembly and, Phyllis, was 
elected to the office of drill leader. 



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Al^TS & ENTEI^TAINAiENT 




Gen's Tiramisu Bowl 



Here is a great recipe I received from my 
cousin Gen following a Christmas lunch we 
recently had with several cousins. 

When you think of tiramisu, lady fmgers 
come to mind because that's what they usu- 
ally are made with. But his recipe is done 
with vanilla wafers and one surely to please. 
Tlnunisu Bowl 

1 - ounce package of cream cheese (soft- 
ened) 

3 cups cold milk 

2 packages Jell-O vanilla flavor instant 
pudding and pie flIUng. 

1- 8 ounce tub of cool whip topping, 
thawed and divided 
48 vanilla wafers 
1/2 cup brewed coffee, cooled, divided 



2 squares semi-sweet baking chocolate 
(coarsely grated) 

1 cup fresh raspberries 

Beat the cream cheese in a large bowl 
until creamy. Gradually add the milk,. Add 
the dry pudding mix and stir well. Then add 
the whipped topping. 

Line the bottom and sides of a bowl with 
half of the wafers. Drizzle with half of the 
coffee, layer half of the pudding mixture over 
the wafers, and then top with half of the 
grated chocolate. Repeat all layers starting 
with the wafers and coffee. Top with remain- 
ing whipped topping and the raspberries. 

Refrigerate for at least two hours if you 
can wait that long and then enjoy! 




Bay State Skating Classes At Shea Rink 



Skating classes are now 
being offered at Shea 
Memorial Rink. 65 1 Willard 
St., for children, age 4 1/2 
years old through adult, 
thanks to Bay State Skating 
School, a non-profit 
corporation. 

Enrollment is ongoing and 
class fees are pro-rated. 

Separate skill classes are 
held at the beginner. 



intermediate and advance 
levels. Classes general 
include seven to ten skaters 
and beginner classes are 
small. 

Skaters can wear either 
figure or hockey skates. Each 
class includes a group lessor 
and supervised practice. 

Instructors are 

professional and patient, 
according to spokesperson 



Rosemary Cloran who said 
that the school has ten 
instructios at Shea Rink and 
a total of 130 teachers. 

The school's staff also 
teaches at a dozen other rinks 
operated by the Department 
of Conservation and 
Recreation (DCR). Other 
locations include facilities in 
Weymouth, Quincy, Hyde 
Park and Dedham. 



UrEYOU iXXACtM FOk A SfAALL. CHAUBmm. NURTURING 

ACAbEMOC BIVZRONMeNT FOR YOUR CHZLD? 

U>OK NO FURTHeRI 




ST. MARY SCHOOL 

121 Crtsccfit Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 
www.stmQry schoolquincv.com 
617-773-5237 
QuaKty Cdttidk Education (K-1 to firodt 
Challenging Acodcmic Program 
Cbmmitmtnt to Faith Dtvelopmcnt 
Small Closs Site 

Bcfora and Afttr School ft*ograms 
5 bay/Pull Day K-1 and IC-2 
Aecrodittd by tht NEASC 
cofy a c c ti s from SE Exprusway 
(3 minutas off MghiMyi) 
OPEN HOUSE - SUNDAY. JANUAM ZT. 2006 

10:30 AM. - 12:30 P.M. 
•ON for an Information pocktt or to arromc a tourl 
NOMf ACCEPTINS AffUCATIONSl 



FOUR YOUNG QUINCY raldents wUl be traveUng to DobUn, Irdand to perform In The Joor- 
ney **A Cdli Across the Water.** They are (foreground fmn 1^): Krista Laforest, Kyle LaUy, 
Meghan Healy and Kelsey Laforest with Aidan Maker. 

Four Quincy Youngsters TVaveling 
To Dublin To Perform In Irish Dance 

Four young Quincy resi- is an amazing oppoitunity to School of Music of Quincy, 

dents will be traveling to be a part of a professional MA will present Tlw Journey 

Dublin, Ireland to perform in production for these danc- "A Ceili Across the Water" 

The Journey "A Ceili Across ers," said Margaret Laforest, at Milton High School Sun- 

the Water." a parent of two cast mem- day, Jan. 27 at 7 p.m 

Produced by Quincy's bers. 
own Aidan Maher, the show The dancers are all mem- 
highlights Irish Culture and bers of the Clifden Academy 
features Irish Music and of Irish Dance located in 
Dancing with a cast of 80. Milton and South Boston. 

"Aidan's talent for show The Clifden Dancers, 

production and as a musician bothjunior and adults, along eling to Dublin, Ireland 

is renown throughout the lo- with Irish fiddle players and where they will perform at 

cal Irish community and this singers from the Congress the Helix Center. 

Election Day Sale At Beechwood On The Bay 

Volunteers at Beechwood Election Day, Feb. 5 from 8 collectibles, decorations, re- 
Community Life Center will a.m. to 3 p.m. 
hold a "mini-fundraiser" on Offered will be books. 



Tickets are $30 and can 
be purchased by calling 
Eileen (Dillon) Dinn at 617- 
504-6190 or Aidan Maher at 
617-479-1178. 

The cast will also be trav- 



FREE Quick Over-The-Phone 

HOME EVALUATION! 

24 hrRecoided message 800-611-0351 1.D. #1002 
HYPERLINK "http7/www.QuuicyWhatsMyHomeWocth.com' 
www.OuincvWhatsMyHonieWorth.com 



cycled gifts, toys, candles, 
and lotions, Also baked 
goods. 

Dcmations will be appre- 
ciated. 

FcM* more information, can 
Maryann Mahoney, senior 
center coordinator at 617- 
471-5712. 



Enjoy an upcoming ^^mg/^^a^ 
at Sunrise of Braintree 

Sunrise of Braintree is committed to furthering the icnowledge of senior living topics 

through events and seminars designed to help and inform seniors and their caregivers. 

Join us to learn something new and even meet some new friends. Meet our team and tour our 

community and see what we do to make our community a place seniors are proud to call home. 

Pfoase RSVP for each event or ca// for more deta^ 
Question and answer sessions will be held. Refreshments will be served. 



Winter Depression 



1bNMflfaq)frAMi.29Ch 
trOOpm 

hy IC^MgNMT} Hemor^ 
MRTNERS Home Cam 

Come join us to feam why 

acme inAvyuals oqperksnoe 

an exagierMed sense of 

sadness, k» and kduigy 

dmxighouc the ^Kxtenli^ 

days ofhSl and winter. 

Find out what can 

be done to manage 

this type of depiession. 



Healthy Heart 
Presentation 



2HX)|Nn 

by Leslie Vkkers, Director, 

Bayada Nurses 

m Quincy 

LeamMihat steps 

you can take to have 

ahealdiyheait. 



Sunrise 

Assisted Living* 



Valentine's Day 
Chocolate Buffet 



Z^OOpm 

Comeonyour own 

or fara^your swe^heart 

for a sweet treat 

henia &ffiriBe of Braintree. 

Sao^>{eabuflletof 

i»Mgenc chocol^es. 



^6. 



Sunri— olBraintr— 781-356-0190 Assisted Uving. Alzheimer's Care 

618 Granite Street, Braantree, MA 02184 
For tnfbnnation and a FREE onUne newsletter, visit www.sunrisesenicxliving.com 



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SCCIAL 



Fontbonne Announces 

NHS Inducts, 
Honor Roll Students 



Two Quincy students 
have been inducted into the 
National Honor Society at 
Fontbonne Academy. 

They are: 

Allison Foley, grade 11; 
and Catherine Abbott, grade 
11. 

In addition, 15 Quincy 
students have been named to 
the first quarter honor roll at 
Fontonne Academy. 

They are: 
FIRST HONORS 

Grade 12 : Phoebe 
Nelson, Maura Gavaghan, 
Jennifer Grimmel and 



Hannah Whitehead. 

Grade 1 1 : Catherine 
Abbott, Allison Foley and 
Kayla McGonagle. 

SECOND HONORS 

Grade 12 : Kimberly 
Krezwick. 

Grade 11 : Peachanok 
Lertkajornkitt, Jennah 
Valcourt. 

Grade 10 : Katie Grant, 
Emily Boyd and Bridget 
Mazza. 

HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Grade 12: Karen Wong. 

Grade 9: Allison Culkin. 





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TWO QUINCY STUDENTS have been inducted into the Na- 
tional Honor Society at Fontbonne Academy. AUison Foley, a 
Junior (first row, fourth frmn left) and Catherine Abbott, a Jun- 



ior (second row, second from left) were among the academy's 
studmts selected for the honor. Fontbonne Acadony is a Catho- 
lic, odlege-preparatory high school for young w<Hnen. 



Girl Scout Cookie Sale Underway 



The Girl Scouts' annual 
cookie sale is underway 
locally to benefit local troops 
in the Patriots' Trail Council. 
The cookies will be sold 
through March 16. 

The Girl Scout cookie sale 
is now over 100 years old 
with its beginnings in a 
Muskogee, OK kitchen. The 
program is designed to help 
Scouts develop leadership 
skills, set goals, learn money 
management and develop 
marketing skills. 

Not only are tiJe Scouts 
selling the traditional 
favorites, but, this year, 
they've added Cinna-Spins, 
a cinnamon swirl cookie 
packaged in five ready-to- 
grab-and-go 100 calorie 
packs. 

Traditional favorites like 
Thin Mints, Caramel deLites, 



Peanut Butter Patties, 
Shortbread, Peanut Butter 
Sandwiches, Lemonades, 
and Thanks-A-Lot delights 
are also available. 

All cookies are zero trans 
fat per serving in compliance 
with the federal Food and 
Drug Administration (FDA) 
regulations. 

The Patriots' Trail 
Council is one of the largest 
organizations in Greater 
Boston dedicated to young 
girls. The Council serves 
23,000 Scouts with 10,500 
adult volunteers in 65 cities 
and towns. 

Once the baker is paid, all 
funds from the sales of 
cookies remain in the area 
where the cookies are sold. 
The proceeds are used for 
council projects, such as 
maintaining campsites. 



providing travel assistance 
funds, and the expenses of 
leadership programs for adult 
volunteers. 

Some councils allow 
troops to use a portion of 
their revenue for special trips 
to museums or exhibits, 
camps and community 
service programs. 

The Patriots' Council 
chose ABC Bakers of 
Richmond, VA, forthe 2007- 
2008 season. 

Girl Scout cookies are $4 
a box. Fbr' inforlnation on 
local sales, please- visit 
www.ptgirlscouts.org. 



Nursery School 

781-843-8030 

12 Elm St., Braintree 

2nd floor 

www.lollipoptreekids.com 



NEAYC 



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Ages 3.9-5 years 

• Educating young children for 
over 25 years. 

• Well-qualified & dedicated staff. 

• Before & After School Programs. 

• Art, Music and Gym Programs. 



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* Laundry Facilities 

* Residents Room 



ONE & TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 

Call Monday - Friday 9:00 -5:00 

617-773-9542 



Free Movie For Seniors 

The Council on Aging month at the River Bay Qub, charge. Refreshments wiU be 
will show the movie of the 99 Brackett St. provided. Call Ann at 617- 
month free to seniors on thfc jhe moyie is provided by 376-1 506 to reserve a seat, 
third Thursday of every west Coast Video at no 



Open House 
Jan 27 I 
From 9-1 



All Are Welcome 
Registration Begins This 




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JEWELRY 



I^PL50n Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 617-786-7942 

January Birthstone is Garnet - Handicapped Accessible 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unity Candles 



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CROSSING. 



Rosary Beads 



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Mod - Sat 9:30ain - 6:30piii 



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(617) 471-0990 



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24, 



«P 




QUINCY COLLEGE graduates waiting in line to receive their degrees on stage in tlie grand 
iMdiroom of the Quincy Marriott Hotel during the recent winter commencement 



GRADUATES LOOK ON as President Harris awards Norfolk County Sheriff Michael G. BeUotti 
the Certificate of Appreciation to the Sheriff's Office. 



Winter Commencement Held At The Quincy Marriott 

Quincy College Awards Degrees To 156 Graduates 



Twenty-three Quincy resi- 
dents were among the 156 
students who received de- 
grees and certificates from 
Quincy College at its winter 
commencement held re- 
cently at the Marriott Hotel 
in Quincy. 

Commencement speaker 
Susan G. Paris, assistant 
dean of Sciences and Quincy 
College alumna, presented a 
heartfelt speech filled with 
personal recollections and 
supportive encouragement 
about encountering self- 
doubt throughout her life. 
'The new and unknown will 
always be a little frightening, 
but in a gocxl way," she told 
the graduates. 

After her speech. Paris 
was awarded the Distin- 
guished Alumna Award, pre- 
sented to her by Quincy Col- 
lege President Martha Sue 
Harris. 

President Harris then in- 
troduced two more special 
guests, awarding them with 
two distinct awards. Norfolk 
County Sheriff Michael 
Bellotti was awarded the 
Certificate of Appreciation to 
the Sheriff's Office for pro- 
viding the Honor Guard for 
Quincy College commence- 
ments as well as his efforts 
and contributions to the lo- 
cal community. 

John Warren Geils, Jr., 
also known as Jay Geils of 
the legendary rock and roll 
group The J. Geils Band, was 
awarded an honorary 
associate's degree for his 
contributions to music and 




QUINCY COLLEGE PRESIDENT Martha Sue Harris mak- 
ing her way to the stage 



education. Geils addressed 
the audience and said to the 
rows of graduates, "Pursue 
your dreams no matter how 
crazy." 



the Quincy College Board of 
Governors lined up to the 
front of the state for the 
awarding of the degrees. One 
by one, each student adorned 



Graduates, faculty, staff, j^ commencement regalia 
families and friends were marched to the stage to re- 
treated to an enlightening ^eive their diploma, 
and good-humored student ^s the graduation cer- 
reflection, which was pre- g^ony came to a close, and 
sented by fellow classmates ^^en the last person of the 
and winter graduate, Barbara recessional march exited the 
Pickering. Pickering remi- hotel's grand ballroom, 
nisced about some of her fa- g^duates with their families 
vorite and most memorable ^^^ f^^j^^^ Ungered in the 
classes offering up some hallway congratulating and 
witty comments about her ^sj^ng the best of luck to 
experience getting through j^eir fellow graduates and 
math and the uniqueness of fnends 



her favorite professors. 

Pickering received loud 
applause and a standing ova- 
tion from the audience as she 
ended her speech by saying 
to her fellow graduates, "We 
need to take life one step at a 
time, but we must, we must 
keep stepping!" 

Following Pickering's 
speech. President Harris and 



I 



ARE ALCOHOL OR DRUGS CAUSING 
PROBLEMS IN YOUR FAMILY? 

The FAMILY PROJECT may help. 

The Family Project is a study being done by 

Harvard Medical School researchers at Bay State 

Commimity Services in Quincy &Weyinouth. The 

study offers free counseling to individuals with 

alcohol or drug problems. To qualify, you must: 

* Have a current alcohol or drag 
problem 

"* Cunently live widi a family 
member (parent, siUing, adult duld) 

* Have a family member without a 
current alcohol or drag proMan 

For moR infoimation, caU 617-6!M-^i2 



Students receiving de- 
grees: 

Q]iiii£X 

Mary Abdoo 
Carlos Ashmanskas 
Brian Austin 
Joseph Barry 
Larinda Croxen 
Jenny Deng 
Stacy Doyle 
Tma Falconi 
Nicole Ferraz 
ErindHakani 
Shanna Henkin 
Jinyan Hou 
Kadieriiie Huriey 
Couitney McDonald 
Mikna Michelangelo 
Angelina Moscato 
AfmlMullaney 
Diane O'Donnell 
Chang Yeul Park 
Ruth Sylvester 
JidieZhai 



Paula Jo Beniers 
Liane Donaher 
Michael Hayes 

ArtQP 

Young-Jong Kim 
Allston 

Alexander Klementev 
Wimontip Sooklert 
Arlington 
Prazol Sapkota 
Boston 
Rajesh Aryal 
Edson Bueno 
Shirley Casey 
Hristo Dzhambov 
Bradley Hendershot 
Sukia Omere 
Patricia Pankievich 
Nicole Perry 
MaiTrinh 
Fugin Yu 

Bramt rw 

Mary Barry 
James Carney 
Ran Ma 
Lila Mueller 
Meaghan Shells 
Bridgewater 
Sherry Davis 
Brighton 
Elton Xhoja 

Prockton 

Carla Andrade 
Colette Blaise-Bycinte 
Marc Selin 
Laishonda Smith 
Evanilda Soares 
Mercy ^llanueva 
Stephanie White 
Bnwklinc 

Georgi Ivanov 
Holly Jordan 

Lindsey Schoener 
ramhridgi^ 

Stephan Scott 

Aminata Traore 

Canton 

SarinaSim 

Carver 

JiK^lyn Johnson 

Shawn Petrozziello 

Jolanta Uchanska 

Stephanie Ciccketd 



Jennifer Doyle 
HuiPang 



Katarzyna Augustyn 
JetmifN* Barbosa 
Joel Baudwiin 
JilUan Dohefty 
Itanwattie Gaya 
"DKlesse Geixewolde 
Petrina Jacob 
SttvMec^ 



Kirsten Newell 

Laura O'Brien 

Desislav Orecharski 

Andrzej Tyszka 

Puxbury 

Jennifer Dennehy 

Sandra Mackin 

Sharon Schwanke 

Everett 

Sophia Radouani 

Foxboro 

Cynthia Farley 

Halifax 

John Almy 

Jeremy Hartz 

Hanover 

Dominic Letterio 

Harwichport 

Tanya Atanasova 

ffipgham 

lyier Donovan 

Holbrook 

Colin Mitchel 

Hull 

Tonya Mortensen 

HydgP arl^ 

Radha Baldeo 

Jamaica Plain 

Anthony Olorunsola 

Klosstsii 

Julia Eldridge 
Maiden 
Rajiv Basnet 
Leeza Tuladhar 

Leanna Karoblis 

Marshfi^W 

Mary Dibeneditto 
Paul Gentile 
John Maitell IV 
Mattapan 
Sandra Brown 

MWdlylwrQ 

Colleen Gadles 

Miltsa 

Liopel Dessources, Jr. 
CaitlynFinn 
Christopher Potts 

Na«>«iham 

Lucia Toledo 
North Carver 

Robin Roy 

North Wcymoirth 

Sharon Auger 
Andrea Duffy 
Toni Fisher 

UsssaoA 

Akksey Filatov 

ffwrnhriAg 

Danielle Rousayne 

Hynwrtli 

Constance Ci4>pella 
Benjamin Dater 
AmiKni^ 
Kimberiy Ixnw 



Amanda Lyne 

Sara Phippard 

Kristen Utera 

Laura Wilson 

Michael Woodford 

Randolph 

Gloria Castro 

Christine Donovan 

Barbara Pickering 

Raynham 

Aida Brolo Echeverria 

Revere 

Whitney Crosby 

Rwiaand 

Danielle Coughlin 
Denise Russell 
Roslindale 
Yves- Junior Honore 
Somerville 
Chungta Gurung 
Poojan Rai 
Pravesh Thapa 
South Boston 
Jaclyn McMillan 
South Deerfield 
Jillian Brown 
Stoughton 
George Reed, Jr. 
Taunton 
Luke Hebert 
Karen Marchand 

£^alpal£ 

Iman Duwaji 
Waltham 

Jacqueline Mukwayi- 
Sutton 

Gregg Scott 

Mary White 

Weymouth 

Joanne Amwine 

Christa Chapman 

Reahna Ciampa 

Owen Clements 

Matthew Delorey 

David Flynn 

Milka Fong 

James Edward Kearney 

RiriPatel 

Lamiita Piseru 

(Serfoanescu) 

Sherry TVuner 

Kristen Wiitanen 

Whitmiin 

Kelly Faghan 
E>enise Fillis 

MeUssa Morosas 

Dmitry Makarov 
Students Receiving Cer- 
tificates: 
Middlebore 
LisaHabbottb 
Ply mouth 
Suzanne Stc»e 



X;w\.\UJ^kbkVA «^.^k 



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WKmais^4^> 



Iteinday, January WfF^ ^nm XtmSEtUl^n^uR fW|i!7 



Quincy Center Landmark 

AbigaiFs Crossing Gift Shop 
Plans Closing By March 31 



Ward 3 Democrats 
To Caucus Feb. 2 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Abigail's Crossing, a 
landmark gift shop in Quincy 
Center, will close 
pennanently in early spring, 
according to shop owner 
Joanne Dondero of Quincy. 

"It's not for financial 
reasons; it's a life change," 
Dondero says,"I want to go 
out as a success." 

Dondero said her business 
is thriving, but she's decided 
now it's time for family, her 
oil painting and travel with 
her husband Hank. 

"Quincy needs a gift shop 
and Quincy needs the 
business," Dondero said, but 
added, "It's just that my 
family is more important. If I 
keep putting it off and putting 
it off, these things will never 
be done." 

"I worked very hard to 
maintain a level of pride and 
reputation that I ' m proud of," 
said Dondero in explaining 
why she won't sell the shop, 
its inventory, or its name to a 
new business owner. She 
welcomes newcomers to 
open a similar store and 
suggests they, too, can be a 
success. 

The Quincy Square 
landmark, located across 
from the Church of the 
Presidents, opened Tuesday, 
Nov. 16, 1993 at 1352 
Hancock St. and moved a 
few doors up to its current 



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Registered Democrats in 
Ward 3 will caucus Saturday, 
Feb. 2, at 10 a.m. at the 
Lutheran Church of the 



vided between women and 
men. 

Those who meet the 
qualifications for delegate 



Good Shepherd, 308 West but are not chosen may ap- 



close out the name." 

However, Manning said 
she hopes that another gift , ... 
shop will move in at that Squantum St., to select 10 ply to be "add-ons m the 
location quickly, 'The spot delegates and two alternates categones of youth, minor- 
is great We need the to the state convention. ity and disabled. 

The convention will be Challenges to the del- 
held Saturday, June 7, at the egate selection process can 
Tsongas Arena in Lowell to be filed with the Massachu- 



great... 
business." 

Fifteen years ago, 
Dondero found the location 
during her daily walks with a 
friend. She decided a gift 
shop would be the ideal 
business. Her husband helped 
her pick the unique name that 
identifies the city and the 
shop's location across from 

(Cont'd On Page 28) 



endorse candidates for U. S. 
senator in the 2008 election. 
Candidates for delegate 
and alternate at the Feb. 2 
caucus must consent to the 
nomination in writing and be 
present at the caucus. The 
delegates will be equally di- 



setts Democratic Party, 56 
Roland St., Suite 203, Bos- 
ton 02129 no later that 10 
days after the caucus date. 
For more information, 
contact Ward 3 Chair Mike 
Covais at 617-328-8735. 



ABIGAIL'S CLOSING - Joanne Dondero of Quincy, owner of 
Abigail's Crossing Gift Shop, 1352 Hancock St, plans to close 
the Quincy Center landmarlc gift shop by March 31 to spend 
more time with lier family. 

Quincy Sun Photo/Noreen Pepdjonovic 

location at 1360 Hancock St., said Maralin Manning, 

four years ago. Executive Director of the 

Everything in the store Quincy Business Association 

will be marked down 15% who considers the closing of 

when the closing sale begins Abigail' s Crossing a big loss 

Friday, Feb. 1. Dondero for Quincy Square. 




expects to lock up for the 
final time on March 3 1 . The 
shop will be missed. 

"It's hard to talk about," 



The All New 



"She is a stellar retailer. . ." 
Manning said, "She's built 
such a reputation for quahty . 
I understand her wanting to 



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Thonday, Jamuuy 24, 2tl8 



Bell Says Voters 

Key To Democracy, 

Human Rights 



(Cont'd Fmm Page 2) 
"civil society is shrinking. 
We are becoming a country 
of the corporations, by the 
corporations and for the cor- 
porations." 

"Our democracy, that 
means government by the 
people, is underfunded." said 
Bell who then described out- 
dated voting equipment, 
bridges that fall down, 
schools that fail, bigger pot- 
holes, bigger deficits and 
smaller expectations for 
Americans. 

"Wc need to change that, 
because, without voter turn- 
out and participation in the 
process, special interest 
groups are running the gov- 
ernment and the country. We 
need to organize people and 
build power in the commu- 
nity. ■' 

Hach of Monday's speak- 
ers echoed Bell's message 
and stressed the need for sac- 
rifice and vigilance in the 
eternal search for human 
rights for all. 

Keating warned that a 
younger generation of chil- 
dren-needs immediate atten- 
t..)n as he is witnessing more 
and more human rights of- 
fenses involving younger and 
younger children. 

Keating said that, more 
and more, "the unfortunate 
acts of young people" are 



Keating then quoted King 
as he urged all to "straighten 
our backs and work ever 
harder." 

"Freedom comes at a 
cost," said Rev. Dr. Thomas 
Phang, Canon for Asian 
American Ministry, Episco- 
pal Diocese in his opening 
prayer for the breakfast par- 
ticipants. 

Phang urged his listeners 
to "continue to speak out 
against injustice" so that Dr. 
King's vision "may not be a 
dream, but a reality." 

Mayor Thomas Koch con- 
gratulated the audience for 
braving the sub-freezing tem- 
peratures and bitter wind to 
participate in the event. 

"It is important to come 
together," said Koch adding 
that the actions of evil per- 
sons are not as dangerous "as 
the appalling silence of the 
good people." 

"Quincy will not remain 
silent. . . ." promised Koch. 

Event organizer Ann 
Yeomans, Chairperson of the 
HRC, said that commission 
members "do want to work 
with the schools, talk about 
human rights." 

Yeomans, Keating and 
City Council President Jay 
Davis presented the awards 
for the three recipients. Dr. 
Joseph McDermott and Janet 
and Alden Poole. Modera- 



coming to his attention. The tors were Kumu Gupta, HRC 

offenders are now younger Vice-chairman and Harvey 

and younger, in "late elemen- Solomon, HRC treasurer, 
tary and middle school years. Elizabeth McDermott ac- 

They are younger, I think, cepted the plaque on behalf 

than when I took office." said of her husband who is tem- 

Keating. porarily hospitalized at 

Free Senior Medical Trips 

Medical transportation eluding those to Braintree 

with curb to curb service Hospital, Carney Hospital. 

Mondays through Fridays is Milton Hospital and eight 

provided at no cost to Quincy major hospitals in Boston, 
seniors. To request a trip, call the 

The service requires two Transportation Office at 6 1 7- 

weeks notice for trips, in- 376-1242 



Quincy Medical Center. Dr. 
McDermott, a retired optom- 
etrist, is a long-time activist 
and member of the Human 
Rights Commission. 

Alden Poole reminded the 
audience that King's mes- 
sage was one of non-violence 
and that King rejected war as 
the solution to world prob- 
lems. 

Unfortunately, Poole said 
the United States has not pro- 
gressed toward peace in the 
years since and he noted that 
there are "2 1 different coun- 
tries we have bombed." 

On his chest, Poole wore 
an array of medals earned 
during his years as a combat 
veteran of World War II. He 
said he wears what he called 
the 'fruit salad" of medals 
because they give him "cred- 
ibility when I speak against 
war." He is a member of 
Veterans for Peace and of 
Disabled American Veter- 
ans. 

The audience applauded 
when his wife Janet, in her 
acceptance speech, described 
her recent arrest for protest- 
ing the war in Iraq. 

Both Pooles have spoken 
on non-violence, war myths, 
the depleted uranium cover- 
ups, and the death penalty at 
colleges, high schools and 
parishes. They were, also, 
active in raising awareness 
of the evils of apartheid in 
South Africa. 

Janet Poole chaired the 
English Department at 
Woodward School for 18 
years and was president of 
the Quincy League of 
Women Voters. 

Alden Poole was former 
executive news editor at the 
Boston Herald and taught at 
Simmons College where he 
was also chairman of the 
Department of Communica- 
tions and is emeritus profes- 
sor. 




THE GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATION honoring Quincy is presented at the city's 12tli 
Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Breaiifast Mayor Thwnas Koch (tliird from left) accepts the 
award from Ron Bell, Director, Governor's Office of Civic Engagement With Koch and Bell are 
ofHcers of the Quincy Human Rights Commission, (left to right) Harvey Solomon, Treasurer; 
Kumu Gupta, Vice Chairperson; Bell, Koch and Ann Yeomans, Chairperson. 




HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION members gather at the Martin Luther King Breakfast with 
Mayor Thomas Koch. In the foreground are (left to right) Faye Reed and Kumu Gupta, vice- 
chairman. In the second row, left to right, are Edmund Grogan, Ann Yeomans, chairperson. 
Mayor Koch, and David Ezickson. In the third row, left to right, are Niel Orlando, Norfolk 
District Attorney's office. Rev. David Hefling, Lt Jeffrey Burrell, Thomas Fabrizio, and Harvey 
Solomon. 




YOUNGSTERS from the Germantown Neighborhood Center ei^oyed pancakes, bacon and rc^ 
with their councillors at the Martin Luther King Breakfast From left are Bill Mitchell, Qumcy 
community police offtcer, Robert Hill, 7, Joshua Quinlan, 9, Cyanna Manning, 8, and her mother 
Jennifer Manning, a vdunteer at the center. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 



BATES & RIORDAN, llp 

Attorneys At Law 





Theodore RiordaB, Esq. 

Former deriL, RI Siqxeme Court 



l>eboraii Bates Rioidan, Esq. 

Nurw-Ationiey 



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ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH MENU 



Monday, Ian. 28 

Pepperoni ^zzatas, fie^ 
fruit, fruit juice. 

1besday,J«i.29 

Eaity leleise day - no 
lioichs«ved. 

WcAieoday,Jan.30 

GriBed hot diog OQ a bun, 
Ndced b^ms, frail juke. 
Tbraaday, Jm. 31 

Rottod wift tooiatt) aad 
neat ssoee. vcg^afc4e, jwx. 



ftiAiy,M>.l 

Wtoto wb^paiKiifces, 
applesftsce cup. maple 
syrap, sausi^ link, fruit 



» ■%. k. fc ^ 






SECONDARY 
LUNCH MENU 



Mofl^y, Jan. 28 

Pizza, tossed salad, fresh 
firtiitcH: fruit jui(%. 
Tbes^y, Jan. 29 
Roast turkey, masl^ 
piMatoes and gravy, IkH veg* 
^i^>le,diiaierrda, 
sauce. 

Weita«Kiay,J«i.30 

Steak sad chee^ »ibaia- 
fine sandwkh. ovCT Readh 
&»», fasSL cop, 6v^ juice. 
Tlnn&y,J«i.31 

Crisis chicks teados, 
QMcan^ «^ di^se, gr^ 
p^», fruit juice. 

Grille ^>t cbg on a bait, 
^ed' 




k%« 



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Tlmnday, January 24» 20M Thm Ouinoar ANan Page 11 



Young People Help Make 
King Breakfast Success 



Adults gave most of the 
speeches Monday, but teen- 
agers cooked and served the 
food and kept the music go- 
ing at Monday's Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Breakfast 
Celebration at North Quincy 
High School. 

Seventeen- year- old 
Allegra Fletcher offered a 
solo rendition of "Lift Every 
Voice And Sing," and, then, 
encouraged the audience to 
join the chorus and, later, the 
singing of "We Shall Over- 
come." 

In addition, 1 7 youngsters, 
ages 7 to 11, from 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Center had a major impact 
on the audience. 

Midway through the 
event, the 1 7 youngsters, each 
carrying a portrait of King, 



took the microphone to offer 
short, but powerful, one-sen- 
tence lessons from King and 
their thoughts on Human 
Rights. 

The food was the best 
ever, according to Ann 
Yeomans, chairperson of the 
Quincy Human Rights Com- 
mission, who congratulated 
the Quincy High School Cu- 
Unary Arts Class for their 
superb cooking. 

Six teenagers, members 
of the high schools' Robot- 
ics Club, volunteered their 
holiday morning to serve the 
350 guests at North Quincy 
High School. 

Servers were Bao 
Nguyen, 1 8, and Tim Schow, 
17 of North Quincy High 
School and Vincent Wong, 
1 7, Fan Li, 1 7; Allen Barrett, 



17; and James Keith, 17, all 
of Quincy High School. 

Overseeing the food serv- 
ing were the Robotic Club's 
coordinators, Paul Mouriello 
and Charles Richard, who 
were joined by Ginna 
Scanlan, Director, Dept. of 
Career and Tech Education 
and Donna Betrand, secre- 
tary. 

The youngsters from 
Germantown who spoke at 
the breakfast were Bianca 
Cadet, David Pham, Tien Le, 
Jennifer Luo, Isabella Batres, 
Katherine Dormady, Tanea 
Savage 

Vanessa Ly, Linda Do, 
Cyanna Manning, Joshua 
Quinlan, Nathan Quinlan, 
David MacLathlin, Ja'von 
Moor, Gieovanny Soto, 
Olivia Rothwell and Talya 
Peeples. 



QCAP Offering Free Tax Help 
To Low-Income Taxpayers 



Quincy Conmiunity Ac- 
tion Programs, Inc. (QCAP) 
is providing low-income tax- 
payers of all ages with free 
tax counseling and tax return 
preparation at the Learning 
Links Technology Center, 
1511 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

IRS-certified volunteers 
will help taxpayers prepare 



both federal and state tax re- 
turns (as applicable), and E- 
file the return for faster re- 
funds. 

A special emphasis is 
placed on helping taxpayers 
claim credits for which they 
may be eligible, including 
the Earned Income and Child 
Tax Credits, and the Massa- 
chusetts Circuit Breaker 



Credit for seniors. 

The service is provided by 
appointment only on Thurs- 
day evenings and Saturdays, 
beginning Jan. 26 through 
April 12. 

For more information and 
to schedule an appointment, 
call (617) 479-818 ext. 174. 
Eligibility limits do apply. 



I found ne 



• • tit 




unities 



"/ was looking for a college thai 
would fit my schedule. The 
flexibility and different 
options that Quincy 
College offered were 
great! Because I live far 
away, I could arrange my 
courses so I'd only have to 
be in class 2 days a week. " 

-Miki 




Quincy College offers 

day and night classes, 

online courses, 1 week 

and 5 week semesters 

and more! 




mGH SCHOOL STUDENT volunteers served the 350 breakfasts at Quincy's 12th annual 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration at North Quincy High School. The six teenagers, all 
members of the high school Robotics Club, attend both North Quincy and Quincy High SchooL 

Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 

Travel With Elderhostel Free Program At Library 



Bill Morgan of Canton, 
Elderhostel Ambassador, 
will present a free program 
Travel & Learn with 
Eldeihostel Monday, Jan. 28 
at 7 p.m. at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 40 
Washington St. 

The program especially 
for older adults 55 and older 



will feature subjects such as 
hiking through the Grand 
Canyon, birding in Costa 
Rica, or rebuilding homes on 
the Gulf Coast. 

Elderhostel programs en- 
compass a range of subjects 
and locations in every state 
of the United States, the 
provinces of Canada and 



more than 90 countries 
around the world, and also 
aboard vessels that travel riv- 
ers and seas. 

Morgan has been on more 
than 40 Elderhostel trips, in- 
cluding three 

intergeneradonal programs. 

For more information, 
caU 617-376-1301. 




Even though his scan will 
only take minutes, 

w€ll give Ulm ^11 f Ue H^e Ue y\eeM. 



To patients, there is no such thing 
as a routine scan. When you have 
your radiological imaging done 
at Milton Hospital, you receive 
personalized, one-on-one care with 
dignity, privacy and warnnth in a 
convenient, comfortable, thoroughly 
professional atmosphere. 

With an MRI Center and the latest 
diagnostic equipment (like GE 



Logiq ultrasound machines and a 
1 6 slice CT scanner), our technology 
is as high level as our reputation for 
compassionate care. 

When your doctor's treatment plan 
calls for expert, patient-friendly 
radiological imaging, request a 
referral to Milton Hospital. We'll 
give you all the care — and time — 
you need. 



m 



MILTON 
HOSPITAL 



AN AFFILIATE OF 

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 



The care you want. Close to honne. 
199 Reedsdaie Road, Milton 617-696-4600 wv»^w.miltonhospitai.org 



T«i!WS^,iBa«^!«aE__ 




QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 



OIJINCY PO LICE STATISTICS; Jan. 11 ■ Jan. 18 

Total Calls for Service : 1^5 

Total Arrests: 41 

Total Stolen Motor Vehicles: 4 

FRIDAY.IAN.il 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3 p.m., 151 Hancock St 
Graffiti. 

LARCENY, 3:57 p.m.. New England Comics, 1511 
Hancock St. Comic books. Book returned. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:33 p.m.. Crown 
Colony Dr. Past vandalism. 2006 Lexus. 
SATURDAY. IAN. 12 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 3:35 a.m., 33 
Mullin Ave. Past. Caller indicated basement apartment was 
broken into. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 9:19 a.m., 45 
Brackett St. Since recovered. Lincoln LS, 2001 . color gray. 
Vehicle was located at Lane Beach, submerged in the water. 
Unknown damages. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:54 a.m., Bernazzani 
School, 701 Furnace Brook Parkway. Vehicle. Large rock 
broke driver side rear window. Vehicle is 2000 Ford Escort. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:39 p.m., Neponset 
Landing, 2 Hancock St. Broken window. Window was bro- 
ken while parked here Jan. 4. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 4:43 p.m.. Crown 
Colony Dr. Broadcast. 2(K)3 Ch.vy PT. Cruiser, color black. 

LARCENY, 6: 17 p.m.. Stop & Shop Supermarket, 65 
Newport Ave. Purse. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:14 p.m., 1543 
HanctK'k St., fourth level. Past. 

SUNDA Y. JA N. 13 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:22 a.m., 20 Craig Ave. 

Caller indicated window was smashed in vehicle. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:10 a.m., 200 Falls Blvd. 
Past. Vehicle broken into on the 8th. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:30 a.m.. Common Mar- 
ket, 97 Willard St. Construction equipment. Callico em- 
ployee reports one of its machines vandalized during last 
evening. Windshield damaged. 

LARCENY, 12:26 p.m., 57 Summer St. Of money. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:36 p.m., 16 Holmes 
St. Past. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:27 p.m., 36 Marlboro 
St. To motor vehicle. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 3:48 p.m., 52 
Warren Ave. Dwelling. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:38 p.m., 152 
Fayette St. Motor vehicle. 

MONDAY IAN. 14 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:21 a.m., 122 Dixwell 
Ave. Prt)perty damage. Caller's fence was struck, also re- 
ports neighbor's shrubs also damaged. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:52 a.m., 186 T^ffraU 
Rd. Broken window. Brick thrown through front window. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 11:01 a.m., 259 
Copeland St 2002 Toyota Camry, color gray. Vehicle is Lo- 
Jack equipped, keys were in the vehicle. Getting some hits 
near Citi/ens Bank and 7- 1 1 on Hancock St.. North Quincy. 

LARCENY, 12:19 p.m., 31 FUbert St. Past larceny from 
vehicle. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:30 p.m., 211 West St. 



ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 5:08 p.m., McDonaid*s, 
275 Hancock St. See employee - states female came in spit 
in her face and left in a motor vehicle. 

LARCENY, 5:38 p.m., 365 Granite St Warrant arrest. 
Arrest on warrant, charges also filed for receiving stolen 
property. 

TUESDAY. JAN. 15 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:57 a.m.. Crown 
Colony Dr. Past. Hit a pot hole, Toyota Camry. Right front 
tire front end aligiunent. Happened Jan. 1 1 . 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:02 a.m.. Quirk Ford 
Inc., 540 Southern Artery. Windshield. Driving in front of 
Quirk and something fell and shattered windshield. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 2:05 
pan., 182 Bellevue Rd. Two males. Arrest made. Caller states 
that a male was trying to gain entry to residence and was 
scared off. Male got into a dark pick-up with another male. 
Pickup headed out of Squantum on Causeway. On arrest 
straight warrant Weymouth, straight warrant out of Scituate; 
warrants located. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:23 p.m., 81 
Walker St Dwelling. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:30 p.m., 326 Quarry St 
Tires slashed. 

WEDNESDAY. IAN. 16 

LARCENY, 9:32 a.m., 156 Crabtree Rd. Past larceny. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:50 a.m.. Landmark 
Education, 1545 Hancock St Window smashed. Front win- 
dow smashed overnight, no entrance gained. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:55 p.m., 289 Granite St 
Vandalism. Two tires flat, possible vandalism. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:29 p.m.. Sun Factory, 
470 Southern Artery. Taiming bed. 

LARCENY, 5:46 p.m., 77 Lancaster St Copper wire 
stolen from bed of truck. 

THURSDAY. .IAN. 17 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 9:22 a.m., 102 Fifth Ave. 
In the past. 

LARCENY, 2:40 p.m., Hannaford Brothers, 475 
Hancock St. Pocketbook. Beige pocketbook, $135 cash, li- 
cense registration, personal papers, taken one hour ago. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:31 p.m., 276 
Fayette St. No signs of forced entry. 

LARCENY, 1:40 p.m., 1 Sea St Past. Someone stole 
his checks and used in Quincy. Bank to handle and notified. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 7:41 p.m., 259 
Washington St Vehicle taken from the lot. 1996 Ford Con- 
tour, color black. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 8:10 
p.m., 1 Willet St Pohce disposition: Unfounded. 



If you have information on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quincy Police Detective Bureau at 617-745- 
5764. If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call the 
Drug Hot-Line at 617-328-4527. You will not be required 
to identify yourself, but it could help. If you wish to make 
an appointment to view the Registered Sex Offenders book, 
call Detective Cindy Walsh at 617-745-5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention Officer for 
tips or comments, my direct hne is 617-745-5719. My e- 
mail address is dminton@ci.quincy.ma.us-Lr. Dan Minton 




OFESSIONAL 
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A Job Well Done 

On Jan. 14, at approximately 5: 15 p.m.. Detective Tom 
Cleary assisted Boston Police Officers in the 300 block of 
Granite Street, serving an arrest warrant for Breaking & 
Entering, Malicious Damage of Property Over $250 and 
Possession of Burglarious 
Tools. 

Upon arrival, Quincy 
Police Officers joined Boston 
Officers in surrounding the 
perimeter of the dwelling. 
Detective Cleary and Boston 
Police Sergeant Dalrymple 
approached the front door 
cautiously and confirmed the 
name of the suspect to the 
name on the mailbox. The 
Officers rang the doorbell 

numerous times and knocked on the door numerous 
times. By looking through the front door window. 
Detective Cleary could see a small boy on the couch 
watching TV. 

As the Officers knocked, the small boy would look 
over at the door and then roll back over on the couch, 
appearing to be sleeping. After approximately 1 minutes 
of this same activity and with no response from an adult 
at this home. Detective Cleary called for the area 
supervisor, Sergeant Patrick Faherty, to respond to this 
location over concerns that the little boy might be home 
by himself 

While waiting the arrival of Sgt. Faherty and maintaining 
the perimeter. Detective Cleary continued to ring the 
doorbell and knock on the front door and window. Boston 
Police Officer Joseph ZanoU was watching the north side 
of the home that had views through the hving room and 
kitchen windows, when he saw the kitchen window open 
and a male start to exit the window attempting to flee. 
When the Officer identified himself and ordered the 
suspect out and to the ground, the suspect retreated back 
inside. Based on past booking photos of the suspect, the 
Officer was able to positively identify the suspect climbing 
out of the window as the person the warrant was for. 

A few minutes later, the suspect started to come out of 
the window again. He was ordered to walk out the front 
door with his hands up. Officers watching from the 
perimeter radioed that the suspect was walking toward the 
front door, and then he suddenly stopped and changed 
directions. With the concern of Officer safety as well as 
the safety of the Uttle boy and others possibly in the home 
(other names on the mailbox). Detective Cleary forced 
open the locked front door by kicking it in. 

As soon as the door was breached, the Officers witnessed 
the suspect run towards them. When the suspect failed to 
comply. Officers rushed him and brought him to the floor, 
where he was handcuffed. For Officer safety purposes, a 
protective sweep (a search for others hiding inside the 
apartment) was conducted. 

One female adult came out of a room and into the 
hallway crying hysterically. Another female emerged 
from a room, and then ran toward a front bedroom. Both 
females were apprehended £uid questioned, while the 
little boy was interviewed and determined to be okay. 

Officers inside the apartment needed a search warrant 
to closely examine each room for evidence related to the 
warrant. In this case, in plain view were six laptop 
computers stacked on the floor and as well as two computer 
projectors, two printer-fax-copy machines, a keyboard, 
computer equipment, cables, and power adapters. In the 
living room and kitchen areas were numerous tools, 
power saws, hand tools, tool boxes empty and fiiU, canvas 
tool bags, pry bars, industrial style cable cutters and small 
cable cutters. 

The suspect, a 35-year old Quincy resident was 
transported to the Quincy Police Station and booked, then 
turned over to the Boston Police. 

This case shows just how unpredictable police woiic 
can be. Each case presents its own unique set of 
circumstances. Here, Officers had to ensure the safety of 
the child knowing that die suspect was inside the q)artment 
with him. Decisions often have to be made quickly and 
with limited information and once a plan is constructed, 
it can change at be aborted as a reaction to what the 
su^)ects c«- others fnesent do. 

Nice Work! 

PAST BREAKS: The following streets had break-ins 
during the past wedc: Mullen Avenue, 1500 block of 
Hancock Street, Wairai Aveaoe, Fayettte Street mA 
Walker Street 






"Tf^ 



x|ni?jy.jy!M0'?4,,^w, ia!^» ti>wy.Sm !yf P 



Trogress' On 
Police Problem 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

It began straining the pa- 
tience of the public when it 
was reported that Quincy 
police officers were arresting 
fewer speeders and drunken 
drivers to spite the chief. 

In the period between 
2006 and 2007, civil cita- 
tions for speeding dropped 
from 1,543 to 1,139 and ar- 
rests for speeding went down 
from 5% to 505. 

Public outrage reached a 
crescendo when Tait was 
quoted as saying: 

"It's much easier to sit 
behind a building some- 
where Ustening to sports ra- 
dio, drinking a cup of coffee. 

"In talking to the guys, the 
attitude seems to be, 'Why 
should I stick my neck out? 



We get paid the same regard- 
less of how many cars we 
stop."' 

But Tait said he had noth- 
ing to do with the apparent 
boycott of speeding tickets. 

Even as Crowley moved 
into the chief's office in 
2004, cars of union members 
started sporting 

bumperstickers reading 
"2012: A New Beginning," 
referring to Crowley's man- 
datory retirement year. 

In the past year, the chief 
and the union headed by Tait 
have tangled over: 

• What the union called 
Crowley's "deUberate" order 
to Officer Michael O'Brien 
to drive a cruiser after his li- 
cense had expired so he 
could cite him for it. 



• The chief's suspension 
for five days without pay of 
Officer Joseph McGunigle 
after he refused to stop tick- 
eting his neighbors for vio- 
lation of the dog laws. 

• Crowley's plan to uni- 
laterally narrow the window 
for vacation days so that the 
patrolmen could not take 
single day vacations outside 
the vacation season. 

• The reported failure of 
Crowley's department to 
provide full coverage of the 
13 sectors of the city 24 
hours a day, seven days a 
week, a complaint that 
reached the City Council. 

Crowley told the Council 
that staffing never fell below 
1 1 sector cars on a shift and 
Tait called the chief's com- 
ment "a blatant lie." 



McFarland Named 

To Head Norfolk 

Aggie High School 



John Hancock Plunge Jan. 26 

What happens when 



you're standing there on the 
beach in your bikini and the 
temperature drops into the 
low 20s and the weatherman 
swears it's going to snow? 
Well, for one thing, they 



full Speedo ahead! are very determined." 

"We goofed by listening There is still time to enter 

to the weather reports this the 2008 Plunge as a Full 

week," admitted Chickie Plunger or a Waist Wader or 



Abdallah, the event coordi- 
nator. 

We were very concerned 



won't let you go in the wa- ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^ p^^^j. 

pants in the Plunge having to 

That s what happened to ^^ip ^^ ^^^j^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^ 

those hardy souls who were 'Therefore, in the future, 

ready to take the second an- ^^e annual John Hancock 

nual John Hancock Birthday Birthday Plunge will be held 

Plunge into the waters off ^„ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^j^^^^ ^^ ^^ 



a Knee Higher or a Dunkin' 
Toe Nut. 

For more information, 
contact Chickie Abdallah at 
617-479-2142 or Leo Kelly, 
chair of the Quincy Beaches 
& Coastal Commission, at 
617-773-1534. 



Mound Street Beach last Sat- 
urday. 

TTie Plunge, a fimd-raiser 
for Interfaith Social Services, 
has been rescheduled for Sat- 
urday, Jan. 26 at the same 
time (12 noon) and the same 



birthdate (Jan. 23) no matter 
what die weather turns out to 
be. 

"Congramlations to the 
hardy folks for speaking up. 

"We have listened and 
have learned that, when folks 



place (Mound Street Beach, ^^^ volunteering to raise 

Qmncy Pomt). ^^^^^ ^^^ Interfaith Social 

This time, and in the fu- Services which helps so 

ture, it's damn the icebergs, ^^^ ^^^^^^ -^^ „^ ^^ 



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Computer & Medical Skills Training 

Quincy College offers popular Certificate Programs 
OTTTVrY ^^^^^S °^ January 28th and continuing throughout the 
c o m c E spring semester at our Quincy & Plymouth Campuses. 

• Self-paced Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, 
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flexible course design & class schedules. 

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We offer the best price/value proposition in the Boston area 
with selected tuitions starting as low as $295. 

For more detailed infonnation call 617-984-1662 

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Quincy College, 24 Saville Avenue, Qumcy, Ma 02169 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

term in November. 

"After all, I'm just mov- 
ing across the hall," he said. 
"I'm looking forward to it. 
And I'm looking forward to 
remaining on the Council 
and working with the mayor 
for the next term." 

The superintendent-di- 
rector is charged with super- 
vision of the 300-acre facil- 
ity in the town of Walpole 

Stress Mangement 

The Quincy Council on 
Aging and Dr. David Smith 
will present a program 
entitled, "Stress Management 
In A Changing World," from 
1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday, 



that serves the 28 communi- 
ties in Norfolk County. 

Its curriculum is similar 
to a vocational-technical 
school with its emphasis on 
farming and related subjects. 

"This is an exciting time 
for Norfolk Aggie and under 
his leadership and vision, our 
school will maintain its sta- 
tus as an excellent agricul- 
tural school," said Angela L. 
Avery, who is retiring as su- 

COA Topic Feb. 5 

Feb. 5 at Koch Park and 
Recreation complex. One 
Merrymount Pkwy. 

For reservations or more 
information, call 617-376- 
1506. 



perintendent-director July 1 
after 10 years on the job. 



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St Aim School in Wollaston invites 

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St, Aim School in Woilaston is a primary and middle school 
for grades Kl (4 year old children) through grade 8. 



St. Ann's offers: 

• Small Class Sizes 

• Full-Day Academic Kindergarten 

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1st choice of Private High Schools. 



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CsM St Ann's today to find out more at 617-471*9071 



Page 14 Tli« Qvaiiiojr 8tta nmnday, laaury 24, 20M 






Triple Header For Paglierani Family 

Quincy Artist Wins 

White House Honors, 

Sons Navy Acclaim 

By LAURA GRIFFIN 

One might say that 
Wollaston's Paglierani fam- 
ily won a triple-header or the 
Triple Crown over the recent 
holidays. 

Anet Paglierani, the 
mother, was honored at the 
White House and two Navy 
admirals cited two of her sons 
for their accomplishments. 

All three ceremonies were 
held within three days in 
Wa.shington, DC, and Vir- 
ginia. 

On Nov. 28. First Lady 
Laura Bush personally wel- 
comed Anet to the White 
House where she congratu- 
lated the Quincy artist for her 
hand-painted Christmas or- 
nament decorating the White 
House tree. 

Anet's ornament depicts 
the Adams mansion, birth- 
places, and the Mendes bible. 
Her ornament was chosen 
through a contest by the Na- 
tional Park Service to repre- 
sent Adams National Historic 
Park. 

"Thank you for helping 
us celebrate America's natu- 
ral and historical trea- 
sures..." wrote Bush in her 
letter congratulating Anet. 

On that same day. Navy 
Admiral David Venlet cited 
her son, Joseph Paglierani. 
for his achievement as senior 
executive and Deputy Pro- 
gram manager at the AV-BB 
Harriet Joint Program office. 
Two days later. Admiral 
William Landay, ONR. 
awarded the Naval 
Research' s 2006 Cheapskate 
Prize to her son, Michael 
Paglierani, and a second ci- 
vilian, Robert Roush. 
"She was so excited about 




THE ADAMS MANSION is depicted in this hand-painted 
ornament by Wollaston's Anet Paglierani. The ornament was 
hung on the White House Christmas tree. 




ANET PAGLIERANFS ORNAMENT showing the birthplaces 
of John Adams and John Quincy Adams won special praise 
from First Lady Laura Bush. Paglierani, a W(rilaston resident, 
was one of the founders of the Quincy Art Association. 



"I sold my home for a nice 
price and liad more tlian 
enough to move to Linden 
Ponds." 




—GUnCroweU, 
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free Information Kit 



I4NDEN PONDS' 






SPECIAL HONORS were awarded to three members of Wollaston's Paglierani family over the 
recent holidays. First Lady Laura Bush saluted Anet Paglierani for her hand-painted Christmas 
ornament whUe two Navy admirals commended her sons, Joseph (left) and Michael (right) for 
their achievements. 



it; we almost had to give her 
smelling salts," said Julie 
Molloy, Publicity Director of 
the Quincy Art Association, 
as she recalled her friend's 
response to all the accolades. 

"She not only got to go to 
Washington to see her orna- 
ment on the tree," said 
Molloy, "but all three cer- 
emonies were in Washing- 
ton at the same time." The 
family members then cel- 
ebrated together. 

"She was one of the origi- 
nal founders of the Quincy 
Art Association," said 
Molloy of the South Shore 
art group which now num- 
bers some 500 members and 
is housed in the Little Build- 
ing, the original Quincy High 
School on High School Av- 
enue. 

Anet's daughter, Elena 
McClanahan of Foxboro, 
accompanied her to the White 
House and other ceremonies. 
Their father, Albert, was un- 
able to attend due to illness. 

A third son, Steven of 
Marston Mills, was oversee- 
ing an inspection by the Coast 
Guard at the Steamship Au- 
thority on Cape Cod where 
he works as an engineer. 

All three sons are follow- 
ing in their father footsteps 
as engineers, according to 
Anet who added that Michael 
also inherited her artistic abil- 
ity. 

"We are so proud of her," 
said Joseph whose work en- 
tails managing trade relation- 
ships on specific projects 
between the United States, 
the United Kingdom, Spain 
and Italy. 

His expertise involves 
identifying cooperative 



projects in which the four 
international partners can 
share costs and solutions. He 
is also responsible for insur- 
ing that United States defense 
security requirements are 
met. 

Joseph and his family of 
Valley Lee, MD arranged a 
special visit to the WTiite 
House to see his mother's 
ornament on the Christmas 
Tree. 

The United State Navy's 
Cheapskate Prize is a highly 
coveted honor for individu- 
als and teams who have 
"clearly demonstrated initia- 
tive, creativity and the suc- 
cessful accomplishment of a 
project that saves costs 
through Science and Tech- 
nology ( S&T)." 

Michael's award was a 
major honor but its name ac- 
tually brought tears of laugh- 
ter from his mother when she 
first heard the news. She 
thought that he was kidding. 

"You're pulling my leg," 
Anet told her son, "You must 
be kidding. 

"We dubbed him 'cheap- 
skate' a long time ago be- 
cause he collects things. Isn't 
that funny? It's an actual 
award.... Of all the funny 
names." 

In addition to his engi- 
neering work, Michael is an 
astute antiques collector, 
refinisher and dealer whose 
many finds fill his home. One 
of his home additions fea- 
tures stained glass windows 
that he found and installed 
himself, according to Anet. 

Once, as a boy, Michael 
collected driftwood and at- 
tached three-dimensional 



shapes, such as shells and 
lobster traps on them. He then 
took them to a crafts sale in 
Squantum for his mother's 
table. That day, Michael sold 
more items than his mother. 

Michael's always col- 
lected things, said Anet, add- 
ing that he has her artistic 
abihty and his father's engi- 
neering skills. 

"I'm not crazy 
about the name of the award," 
said Michael who now lives 
in Portsmouth, RI. However, 
he chuckled and said he takes 
the family teasing in stride. 

"We're more proud of our 
mother," said Michael, de- 
scribing her talent and dedi- 
cation. "We're just working 
people." 

As for her visit to the 
White House, Anet said, "I 
was awestruck," and added 
that she'd just finished read- 
ing a book on John and 
Abigail Adams and thought 
to herself, "I'm bringing 
Quincy back to the White 
House." 

Anet loves Quincy and 
said artists here "don't have 
to go far to look for a subject 
to paint," She described the 
beaches in all seasons, the 
marshes, and the yachts clubs 
at sunset "plus all the histori- 
cal subjects.' 

As a younger woman, 
Anet designed greeting cards 
for Rustcraft. She has sold 
many of her oil paintings to 
corporations and several 
worics hang in the city's mu- 
nicipal buildings. 

She and her husband have 
nine grandchildren. They 
raised their children in the 
WoUaston home where 
they've lived for 55 years. 



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Tharsday, January 24, 2008 Tli« Quince Sun Page 15 



St. Mary School Celebrates Multicultural Week 




ST. MAKY SCHOOL of West Quincy recently celebrated its nflh annual Multicultural Week. 
The international fair included displays from every class. Paola Torres, a sixth grade student, 
shows her exhibit on Spain. 



KATE MCGAHEY, a third grader at St Mary School in West Quincy, displays her exhibit on 
Mexico during the school's recent international fair. Students explored numy cultures and shared 
information and delicious native food with parents and friends during the celebration. 




MARTIN MILLER, a fourth grader at St Mary School in Qumcy, with his exhibit on Russia at ST. MARY SCHOOL fifth graders Shayna Boyle and Tiffany Pham show their exhibit on Italy 
the school's recent international fair. at the school's mtemational fair which was part of its Multicultural Week celebration. 



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Remarkable views. Spacious floor plans. Qracious living. 

This is Stella Maris - the unique new retirement 
destination, nestled in the green heart of Boston's 
South Shore. 156 thoughtfully designed apartments 
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Join Us for a Complimentary 

Luncheon and Lock-in the 

Lx)WEST Entrance 

Fees Now! 



Thursday, January 31'^ 

11:30 a.m. ' 2:30 p.m. 

The Cape Codder - VJ's Grille Room 

1225 lyanough Road 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

Seating is limited. Reservations required. 
Please R.S.V.P. by calling (617) 701-1414. 



Thursday, February 7™ 
11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 

Granite Links Golf Club 

100 Quarry Hills Drive 

Quincy, MA 02169 

STELLA maris) 






www.stellamaris.org 



StelhkMmU a sponsored by The Carmelite Sisters of Marian Manor in South Boston. 



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Neighborhood 

Housing Homebuyer 

Workshop Jan. 28, Feb. 2 



Protecting Your New 
Home And Family 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of the South Shore, 
in conjunction with South 
Shore Savings Bank, will 
host a first-time homebuyer 
workshop Monday, Jan. 28 
from 6 to 8 p.m. and Satur- 
day, Feb. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

The workshop, open to all 
Massachusetts residents re- 
gardless of income, will be 
held at South Shore Savings 
Bank, 1584 Main St., 
Weymouth. 

Attendance at both ses- 
sions is neces.sary to receive 
a homebuying certificate. 

Ail potential first-time 
hoinebuyers are encouraged 



to attend the educational 
workshop. At the workshop, 
participants will have the 
opportunity to speak with a 
lender. 

Topics covered include 
mortgage options, legal as- 
pects of the home buying 
process, how a home inspec- 
tion works, and other presen- 
tations from related profes- 
sionals. 

Participants must com- 
plete the workshop to qualify 
for grant programs. 

There is a $ 1 5 fee per per- 
son. 

To register, or for more 
information, call (617) 770- 
2227 ext. 29. 



171 AVIMIXIL/\JL/1 1 



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Complete Real Estate Service Since 1925 



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FREE OPINION OF VALUE 



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Servicing the South Shore 

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Quincy / Norwell / Marshfield / Duxbury 
Quincy Office: 617-471-7575 



VniMION HOMIOWMRSI! 

lo Dispute I'ropcrt) laxes, 

Al);itomont Applic;iti()ns Must be 

Post NLtrkid l» I eh. Lst. 



For Application Stop By or 

Call The City Assessors Office 

Quincy City Hall 617-376-1171 

http://ci.qiiincy.ma 

This Notification Brought To You By 




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CeU: (617) 347-2861 
Office: (617) 296-3000 
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For all your Real 



(NAPS)-Congratulations 
on owning your new home. 
You've saved diligently to 
afford your dream house 
where you can raise a family 
and create memories to last a 
lifetime. After all your hard 
work, it' s important to protect 
your ability to pay for your 
new home if you die 
prematurely. Many experts 
recommend that you consider 
using life insurance to help 
safeguard your assets and 
protect your family's 
fmancial future. 

In this situation, many 
homeowners think about 



purchasing permanent or 
term life insurance as a 
mortgage protector. If an 
adequate amount of life 
insurance is purchased, the 
death benefit can be used to 
pay the rest of the mortgage 
payments. The death benefit 
can also cover other 
expenses, such as educational 
costs, personal bills and credit 
card debt. Life insurance can 
also serve as an income 
replacement so your family 
can avoid financial 
difficulties and maintain the 
same standard of living 



without you. 

Holiday Food Drive Success 



Register of Deeds William 
P. O'Donnell announces the 
successful conclusion of the 
Annual Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds Holiday 
Food Drive. 

"1 am very grateful to the 
entire Norfolk County com- 
munity, our many Registry 
employees, visitors, title ex- 
aminers and attorneys for 
their generosity in contribut- 
ing to this year's drive," 
O'Donnell said. 

Director Mary Bradley of 
the Quincy Conmiunity Ac- 



tion Program was on hand at 
the Southwest Community 
Center to accept the dona- 
tions from Register 
O'Donnell. 

The Registry of Deeds, lo- 
cated at 649 High Street, 
Dedham, is the principal of- 
fice for real property in Nor- 
folk County. 

Donations are accepted at 
the local pantries throughout 
the year. To make a donation 
visit www.norfolkdeeds.org 
posting of pantry addresses 
or call 78 1-461 -61 04 



QUINCY 



P^F^ SfWM 



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VVhv5()'^i^ Of Homes 

Listed For Sale Doirt Sell 

i he First Time And What 

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C^iincy - If your home has just come off the market and 
hasn't sold, don't get discouraged. The reason your home 
did not sell may have nothing to do with your home or the 
maricet. In reality, your home may have been one of the 
more desirable properties for sale. 

So Wby Didn't Your Home ScU? 

Last year almost half of the homes listed for sale i^ver 
sold at all, and many sellers found that there was a tremen- 
dous amount a homeowi^r needed to be educated on to sell 
their home fiM^ top dollar in the shortest time period. 

Dcm't risk making the wrong choices and losing b(^ time 
and mooey on your investment Before you hire a realtor, 
know the right questions to ask to save you time and money. 

Industry experts have prq>ared a firee special report called 
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THIS 
ISA 





By Samantha Mazzotta 



Disposer Deposes 
Dishwasher 

Q. Ever since a handy- 
• man installed a new 
disposer, I have been 
unable to use my dish- 
washer. The first time I 
turned on the dishwasher 
after the installation, 
water gushed everywhere. 
It looks like a hose wasn't 
attached. I can't get the 
handyman to return my 
calls. Can I fix this myself? 
— Joyce P., Palm Bay, Flo. 

A. It sounds like the 
• handyman didn't fin- 
ish the job, all right. It is pos- 
sible to attach the hose your- 
self, although you might 
want a strong helper to han- 
dle this task as it will require 
levering a few things in and 
out of place while working 
underneath the sink cabinet. 

Disposers have an area to 
connect the dishwasher's 
drain hose, called the dish- 
washer nipple. The sink is 
draining just fine, which 
means the plug is in place. 
Locate this nipple, but don't 
do anything yet. 

First, locate the dishwash- 
er drain hose. Make sure it 
will reach the nipple on the 
disposer. If it is too short, 
you'll need to replace the 
hose — measure the dis- 
tance between the hose con- 
nection on the dishwasher 
and the nipple, head for the 
home-improvement store, 
and pick up a hose that is a 
couple inches longer than 
that. If it is too long, the 



drain hose can be cut to the 
proper length using a hack- 
saw or tubing cutter. 

Next, make sure the dish- 
washer drain hose can be 
properly secured — it 
should have a metal hose 
clamp on the end that will go 
over the nipple; if not, the 
home improvement store 
will have one. 

Now, you're ready. Tiun 
off power to the circuit con- 
trolling the dis]X)ser. 
Remove the plug in the nip- 
ple, using a screwdriver to 
pry it out. Slide the dish- 
washer drain hose complete- 
ly over the nipple so that the 
end of the hose touches the 
disposer body. Tighten the 
metal hose clamp (use a 
Phillips head screwdriver 
and a pair of pliers to do 
this). 

Tum the circuit back on. 
Run the dishwasher, keeping 
an eye on the drain hose. If 
you're really unsure, place a 
bucket underneath the dis- 
poser to catch any leaking 
water. You may have to read- 
just the hose's position or 
tighten the clamp, but as 
long as the plug isn't still in 
the nipple you shouldn't 
have any more problems. 
And you'll have your dish- 
washer back. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homegu- 
ru2000@hotmail.com, or 
write This Is a Hammer, do 
King Features Weekly Ser- 
vice. P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando. FL 32853-6475. 

e 2008 King Featuret Synd., Inc. 



Quincy Community Action 
Homebuyer Workshop 



Quincy Community Ac- 
tion Programs, Inc. ((JCAP) 
will hold a free first-time 
homebuyer workshop at the 
Tufts Library, located at 46 
Broad St., Weymouth in Feb- 
ruary. 



Annex Realty^ Inc. 




Theresa RepofF 
617-821-5298 

rheresaRepofif@aol.com 

Your Personal Realtor 
for Buying or Selling 

/ Can TeU You 

What Your Home 

is Worth 



Workshop dates are: 

Saturday, Feb. 2 from 9 
a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday, 
Feb. 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Participants must attend 
both sessions in order to re- 
ceive a certificate of atten- 
dance. 

The sessions are open to 
everyone regardless of in- 
come, credit ratings, or 
downpayment availability. 

Workshop speakers are 
professionals representing 
different real estate fields. 

Participants wiU receive a 
workbook, which contains 
references that pertain to 
home buying. 

Participants who con^lete 
the course wiU receive a cer- 
tificate which is a (nre-requi- 
site for downpayment clos- 
ing cost assistance, favorable 
soft second and Mass Hous- 
ing mortgages. 

Registration is required. 

For more information on 
this workshop or future 
workshops, contact Ann 
Marie Casey at 617-479- 
8181 ext 119. 



mM^!m&^!^eM fHS9tSti^§eE Mml 




1^ 




E 





Hints For Homeowners 



Is Geothermal Heating Right For You? 



(NAPS) - Keeping your 
home warm in the winter has 
never been easier-or more 
environmentally friendly. 

Geothermal heating and 
cooUng systems offers the 
finest in home-comfort 
conditioning. By utilizing the 
free, renewable solar energy 
stored in the ground, 
geothermal systems are a 
clean and environmentally 
friendly source of energy. 

So if it is decreased energy 
costs, enhanced comfort, 
safety and reliabiUty that you 
want out of your heating 
system, a geothermal unit 
could be the right fit for you. 

The experts at 
WaterFumace recommend 
geothermal systems, such as 
the Envision series from 
WaterFumace, which can be 
easily installed in a wide 
variety of installations-new 
or old homes, large or small. 
Although most systems are 
simply single units in a 
forced-air appUcation, they 
can also be used for other 
types of installations. 

• Geothermal units can 
provide hot water for radiant 
floor applications by 
circulating warm water 
through tubing encased in die 
floor. Floors covered in tile, 
wood, linoleum or stone are 
kept toasty warm, even on 
the coldest days. Since the 
entire floor acts as a giant 
radiator, you'll experience a 
comfortably conditioned 
room with head-to-toe 
consistent comfort. 

• Homes with large 
demands for domestic or 
potable water heating will 

Save Gas and Money 
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benefit from the exceptional 
efficiency of a Water- 
Fumace Synergy geothermal 
system. This unit provides 
dedicated hot water for 
heating and domestic use and 
both heating and cooling 
furnished through a 
conventional duct system to 
condition the air inside the 
home. The complete system 
provides the ultimate in 
savings and comfort with 
safe, reliable, quiet 
performance. 

• Units can also be utilized 
to heat water for pools and 
spas. You'll find that a 
geothermal unit will heat 



your pool or spa for much 
less than an ordinary pool 
heater. And compared to 
fossil fuel-burning heaters, 
it's much safer, too, without 
concerns associated with 
carbon monoxide poisoning. 

• A geothermal unit can 
keep your sidewalks or 
driveway free of ice and snow 
during the cold winter 
months. It eliminates the 
hazards of walking on ice- 
covered sidewalks, and helps 
you forget the backbreaking 
effort off shoveUng snow. 

• Geothermal systems 
operate more efficiently than 
ordinary heating and air- 



conditioning systems 
because they deliver four 
units of energy for every one 
unit of electrical energy used. 
By combing stored Earth 
energy with safe electric 
power, homeowners may 
realize savings of up to 70 
percent on heating, coohng 
and hot water costs when they 
install a geothermal unit. 

Visit 
www.waterfumace.com or 
call 1-800-GEO-SAVE for 
more information on 
installing an energy-efficient 
heating and coohng system 
Uke the Envision series by 
WaterFumace. 



Dollars 
and $en$e 

by David UEBngton 



Homebuyer Seminars Jan. 31, Feb. 2 



Mount Vemon Mortgage 
Corporation announces it is 
sponsoring two free educa- 
tional homebuyer seminars 
for South Shore residents. 

Dates and locations are: 

• Thursday, Jan. 31 from 
6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Tufts Li- 
brary main branch in 
Weymouth, 46 Broad St. 

• Saturday, Feb. 2 from 10 



a.m. to 2 p.m. at 500 Victory 
Rd., Marina Bay, North 
Quincy. 

Pre-registration is re- 
quired. To register, call 781- 
337-2432 ext. 16. 

First-time homebuyers or 
current homeowners will 
leam about working with a 
buyer's broker, understand- 



ing the mortgage process in- 
cluding the importance of a 
pre-approval and what's in a 
credit score, what a home 
inspection is, what role an 
attomey can play at various 
points in the process, and 
more. 

All participants will re- 
ceive a homebuyer kit. 



Pat Santorelli Joins Century 21 Network 



Century 21 Network/ 
Richmond Associates an- 
nounces Pat Santorelli has 
joined the real estate firm as 
a sales associate. 

Santorelli, formerly of 
Success Real Estate, will 
specialize in residential sales 



in Quincy and surrounding 
towns. 

"We are thrilled to have 
Pat join our 'A' team," said 
owner Stephen Richmond. 
"We believe training sup- 
ports growth and profes- 
sional excellence in the real 



estate industry. 

"Performance-based 
training is necessary to as- 
sure that Century 21 associ- 
ates maintain their competi- 
tive edge and offer the best 
service possible to their cli- 
ents," he added. 



Help for Home 
Heating Bills 

A December poll by Cred- 
itCards.com revealed what 
many arc thinking: It's get- 
ting tougher to pay heat 
bills. According to the poll, 
27 million Americans expect 
to have to borrow money to 
pay for heating fuel or utili- 
ties before the winter is over. 
Twenty million of those 
expect that they'll need to 
use credit cards. 

If you're having trouble 
paying your heat bill, there 
are places you can go for 
assistance. 

• Ask your utility company 
for a reduced payment plan. 
You can catch up in the sum- 
mer when your regular bills 
are lower. Some states have 
laws against turning off 
electricity in the winter, 
even if a customer is behind 
on payments. Different 
states have difTerent require- 
ments, such as paying a 
small portion of your 
income, or banning a dis- 
connect if there are medical 
concerns, low temperatures 
or elderly occupants of the 
house. 

• Charities know that peo- 
ple are struggling, and many 
of them have funds set aside 
to help those who can't pay 
their tliel bills. 

• If you must borrow, look 
for a credit union where 
loans will generally have a 
lower interest rate. 

• The Low Income Home 
Energy Assistance Program 
is funded by Congress with 
money sent to states to 
divide among community 



agencies. LIHEAP got a 
boost last month when $409 
million was added to the 
budget. 

In general, a LIHEAP 
applicant who receives 
assistance has an income of 
$20,650 for a family of four. 
However, even if your 
income is over that amount, 
don't let it stop you from 
applying. If you can't find a 
LIHEAP program in your 
area, call die National Cler- 
gy Assistance Referral pro- 
ject at 1-866-674-6327 for 
information on where to 
apply. (Let it ring a very long 
time.) Or send email to ener- 
gyassistance@ncat.org and 
give your state, county and 
city. Leave an e-mail or 
home address for them to 
send you information. 

Don't take the easiest way 
out if you're having trouble 
paying utility bills or buying 
fuel. Taking a cash advance 
or paying by credit card 
shouldn't be yoxir first step. 
Avoid payday loans, too, 
because of the fees and 
interest. Don't use the credit 
card convenience checks 
you were sent over the holi- 
days. Look for the cash any- 
where else fu-st. 

David Uffington regrets 
that he cannot personally 
answer reader questions, 
but will incorporate them 
into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in 
care of King Features Week- 
ly Service, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475, 
or send e-mail to column 
reply@gmail. com. 

© 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Home Of The Week 




^u^nq, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 

61 7-328-3200 






\«««»-'>'--^ 



^ 


in 












ss;?k;- 








*s»«<*^ 


■ .. . 


1 


ivJi, 


fi|:|| 



QUINCY - Completely updated 2b/2ba condo, new 
heating system with an incredible view of the Boston 
skyline and the marina. Priced to sell @ $249,000 

Conway 

^ REALTOR* ' 



JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC.™ 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 

617-479-1500 

www.JackConway.com 

The Largest Independently Owned 

Real Estate Company in Massachusetts 

MA. ML 01943 MA. M.B. 011 74 



CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
617-472-4330 

Across from CVS & WoUaston MBTA Station 



III III 



QUINCY - Beechwood Knoll School District - Buy now and be in 
time for those early evening walks along the beach in the Spring. 
Well maint'd 5rm Bungalow abounding w/charm. Lg vaulted f ireplaced 
living rm w/many designer windows, French doors leading to dining 
room. Built-in china cabinets, updated kitch and bath. Hrdwd firs 
throughout, including kitchen and very desirable 1st fir laundry. Very 
large deck and fenced-in yard. Move-in condition. $299,900 



Qari^ 



Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

a When you're #1 you can 

do things others can't 



See all our listings at: www.c21annex.com 



/ • . f 





by Andret Wyitt 
M^.S^ C.S.C^. 

Sports-Specific 

Training Isn't Just 

for Pros 

If you're getting bored 
with your current workout, 
you might want to consider 
sports-specific training. 
Sports-specific training 
simply means that you 
apply "specific" training 
techniques that mimic a par- 
ticular sport or activity to 
improve your performance. 

Whether you are a week- 
end warrior, belong to a 
recreational basketball 

league or just want to keep 
up with the kids, sports-spe- 
cific training has benefits 
for everyone — not just the 
professional athlete. 

For instance, if you plan to 
go skiing this winter, incor- 
porating ski-specific exer- 
cises into your fitness rou- 
tines could possibly prevent 
common ski injuries to your 
knees and back. Your trips 
down the slopes will 
become a lot more fun as 
you enjoy the added bene- 
fits of increased endurance, 
muscle strength and agility. 

Preparing your body for 
activities that require bal- 
ance, agility and overall 
strength and conditioning is 
extremely important. For 
example, playing in a week- 
ly basketball league could 
slowly begin to stress the 
body, and over time cause 
injuries to the knees, back 
and aiddes. Training your 
body with exercises that 
mimic movements that will 
occur during a basketball 
game will stabilize your 
joints, strengthen your mus- 
cles and improve agility. 

Medicine-ball twists are a 



sports-specific exercise you 
can incorporate into your 
current fimess routine. The 
exercise benefits many 
sports that demand great 
abdominal and back sup- 
port. Here's what to do: 

Take a lightweight medi- 
cine ball or basketball in 
your hands, stand straight 
with your knees bent, 
abdominals and back sup- 
ported, and arms straight 
out in front of you at a 90 
degree angle. Twist your 
shoulders in a slow and con- 
trolled movement to your 
right (keeping your abdomi- 
nals contracted and holding 
the ball straight out), then 
rwist the left. Repeat this 
rotation, slowly and con- 
trolled, for 10 turns. Repeat 
if no pain occurs to your 
back. 

Sports-specific training 
may be just what is needed 
to help motivate you to 
reach your fitness goals. 
Imagine playing a game of 
tag with your children with- 
out restraint, or taking part 
in a spontaneous tennis 
match and feeling fit and 
strong, and you'll become a 
convert to this sort of train- 
ing. 

Andrea Rente Wyatt, 
M.S.S., C.S.C.S., is a per- 
sonal trainer with an exten- 
sive background in strength 
and conditioning as well as 
therapeutic recreation. If 
you have a fitness or train- 
ing question, write her in 
care of King Features Week- 
ly Service, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 
Always consult a physician 
before beginning an exer- 
cise program. 

C 2006 King Funuti Synd. Inc. 




by Steven A Amsf/a D. 

BRUSHING UP 

Dentists advise their pa- What matters most is that 

people use their toothbrushes, 
[MTcferably fw up to three min- 
utes per bmshing session. 

We take great pride in the 
work we perform. We'll be 



tients to replace their tooth- 
brushes at least every three 
to four months to ensure their 
efficient cleansing action. 
Toothbrushes should be re- 



placed even sooner when ill- sure to review your oral and 
ness strikes, because a brush general health history and 



can harbor bacteria that may 
be reintroduced into the 
mouth to prolong sickness. 
What type of toothbrush 
should patients reach for 
when the bristles on their 
older brushes become 
frayed? Patients with im- 
paired manual dexterity may 
be best served by electric 
toothbrushes. As for tradi- 
tional manual toothbrushes 
with tbtit many head shapes 
and handle-angled options, 
the Academy of General 



give you all the options avail- 
able to you. Your dental 
health is our number one pti- 
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6220 to schedule an appoint- 
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Cancer Prevention Tips For 2008 



Experts at Dana-Farber 
Cancer Institute suggest a 
few simple steps that could 
help reduce the risk of devel- 
oping cancer. 

Here are eight to try in 
2008. 

One: Get up and go 

Research shows that 
moderate to intensive aero- 
bic exercise can reduce the 
risk of several cancers, in- 
cluding colon and breast. 
With their doctor's permis- 
sion, someone could: 

• Use stairs rather than an 
elevator. 

• When possible, walk or 
ride a bike rather than drive. 

• Take an exercise break 
at work to stretch or take a 
quick walk. 

• Play a team sport 

• Use a stationary bicycle 
or treadmill while watching 
TV. 

Two: Kick the habit 
According to the Ameri- 
can Cancer Society, smoking 
is the most preventable cause 



of death in the United States, 
accounting for nearly one of 
every five deaths each year. 
It causes more than 80 per- 
cent of all lung cancer cases 
and increases the risk of oral, 
throat, pancreatic, uterine, 
bladder, and kidney cancers. 
Here are some tips to 
help: 

Plan the quit day 

• Choose method of quit- 
ting: 

• Recruit the help, support 
and encouragement of fam- 
ily and friends. 

• Remember why reason 
for quitting: Family, chil- 
dren, and personal health. 

Following through: 
The Four **Dy' 

• Deep breaths. 

• Driiik lots of water. 

• Do something to avoid 
focusing on cigarette 
cravings. 

• Delay reaching for a 
cigarette - the urge will pass. 

Avoid triggers 

• Get rid of cigarettes. 



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lighters, matches and ash- 
trays. 

• Avoid being around 
people who are smoking. 

Three: Sun safety 
matters year-round 
Sunscreen shouldn't be 
packed away just because it's 
winter — the sun's harmful 
rays are present all year long. 
In fact, some experts say 
winter sports enthusiasts can 
face just as much risk of get- 
ting sunburn as summer sun- 
bathers. The snow can reflect 
the ultraviolet (UV) radiation 
that causes sunburn. Sunburn 
in turn increases the risk of 
developing skin cancer. 

• Wear simscreen with an 
SPF of 15 or higher. Apply 
it often and don't forget your 
neck, ears, and hands. 

• Apply lip balm with sun- 
screen 

• Use eye protection es- 
pecially for skiing. Look for 
wrap-aroimd sun glasses and 
ski goggles with UV protec- 
tion. 

• Avoid excessive expo- 
sure to the sun, especially 
during peak hours between 
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the 
sun is at its strongest. 

Four: Cervical cancer 
screening: 

The American Cancer 
Society recommends a 
yearly pap test for all women 
who are sexually active. Be- 
ginning at age 30, women 
who have had three normal 
Pap tests in a row may get 
tested every 2 to 3 years. 

Five: Prostate cancer 
screening: 

Begiiming at age 50, men 
who do not have any major 



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medical problems should 
have a yearly PSA blood test, 
according to the American 
Cancer Society. Men at high 
risk should begin at age 45. 
This includes African Ameri- 
can men and men who have 
a close relative (father, 
brother, or son) who had 
prostate cancer before age 
65. Men with several rela- 
tives with prostate cancer 
should get yearly PSA tests 
starting at age 40. 

Six: Colorectal cancer 
screening: 

Experts reconmiend that 
beginning at age 50, both 
men and women at average 
risk for colorectal cancer 
should have either a 
colonoscopy or flexible sig- 
moidoscopy. People with 
certain risk factors should 
begin screening earlier and 
talk to their doctor about how 
often. 

Seven: Don't forget the 
dentist 

Visiting the dentist is not 
just about clean and healthy 
teeth. Dentists are often on 
the front lines of detecting 
cancer in the mouth, espe- 
cially in smokers and users 
of smokeless tobacco. Re- 
search shows more than half 
of all smokeless tobacco us- 
ers have non-cancerous or 
pre-cancerous lesions in their 
mouth. Their chance of get- 
ting oral cancer is 400 per- 
cent greater than those who 
don't use tobacco. In addi- 
tion to the increased risk of 
cancer, smoking and chew- 
ing tobacco erode teeth and 
gums. 

Eight: Eat an apple a 
day 

One of the easiest ways to 
reduce the risk of cancer is 
to eat a daily diet that is 
loaded with antioxidants. 

Smdies show people who 
eat one or more apples a day 
may reduce their risk of 
breast, mouth and colorectal 
cancer. Apple skin contains 
the cancer-fighting antioxi- 
dant quercitin. The best way 
to get that nutrient is to eat 
apples uncooked and 
unpeeled. 

Pumpkin and other or- 
ange fruits and vegetables, 
including sweet potato, 
squash (buttemut and acorn), 
and carrots, contain cancer 
fighting nutrients called 
carotenoids, which have 
been shown to prevent of 
colon, prostate, lung, and 
breast cancer. 

The bottom line, accord- 
ing to the Dana-Farber ex- 
perts: eating a balanced diet 
rich in vegetables and fruits, 
getting moderate exercise, 
stopping or avoiding smok- 
ing, having an aimual dental 
exam, undergoing tt^ £^ro- 
priate cancer screening tests, 
and using sun screen year- 
round may help reduce a 
person's risk of developing 
a numbo^ of cancers. 



J-.. * ^s ttmo 



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oArtr » r 



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Thursday, January 24, 2008 T^m Quiney ghm Page 19 



Sl^OCTS 



Celebrating Patriots AFC Championship 



Quincy-North Quincy 
In Basketball, Hockey 
Action This Weekend 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

The battle for city 
bragging rights is up for grabs 
this weekend. 

Quincy and North Quincy 
High Schools will meet on 
the basketball court and on 
the ice, starting Friday night, 
in the first of two scheduled 
home-and-away games for 
the basketball and hockey 
programs this winter. 

The varsity girls' 
basketball teams get the 
weekend started with a 5 p.m. 
tip-off at Quincy High 
School's East Gynmasium. 

The Presidents (5-6, 3-4 
in the ACL North Division) 
are coming off a tough 49-45 
loss to Falmouth High School 
on Jan. 18, while the Red 
Raiders (8-5, 7- 1 in the ACL 
North Division) come into 
the tilt against their city rival 
on pace to recapture the ACL 
North crown for the second 
straight year. 

The Raiders currently 
hold a one game advantage 
over last year's co- 
champions. Whitman- 
Hanson HS (10-2, 6-1), in 
the race for the North division 
title. 

Quincy senior Meagan 
Tobin (16.5 points per game)) 
and North Quincy senior 



Rebecca Goreham (14.7 
points per game) are both 
among the leading scorers in 
the Atlantic Coast League's 
North Division. 

The boys' teams are 
scheduled to play 
immediately after the girls' 
game is finished. Tip-off is 
set for 7 p.m. 

Quincy and North Quincy 
are both fighting atop the 
Atlantic Coast League North 
Division standings with 
Plymouth North HS for first 
place. 

The Presidents (8-3 
overall, 5-2 in ACL play) 
defeated Falmouth HS 44- 
41 on a last second Doug 
Scott jumper last Friday (Jan. 
18). Quincy played a league 
game against Marshfield HS 
on Monday (Jan. 21). 

The Red Raiders (7-5, 5-3 
in the ACL) are coming off a 
56-33 league win over 
Dennis- Yarmouth HS on Jan. 
1 8. Senior forward Marcellus 
Lee continued his monster 
season with 28 points and 1 2 
rebounds in the victory. 

Scott (22.7 points per 
game) and Lee (19.4 points 
per game) are both among 
the leading scorers in the 
Atlantic Coast League's 
North Division. 



Both the girls and boys 
basketball teams will meet 
again, this time at the NQHS 
Gym, on Feb. 15. 

The hockey teams will 
face-off for the first time this 
season on Sat., Jan. 26 at the 
Quincy Youth Arena. The 
puck drops at 6:40 p.m. 

North Quincy (5-3-3 
overall, 4-1-2 in the ACL) is 
led by forwards Brandon 
Gilmore (20 goals, 10 assists, 
30 points) and Scott 
Richardson (8-11-19), while 
goaltender Matt Brundige 
(six games, 1.59 GAA) is 
among the top goaltenders in 
the league. 

Quincy (7-4 overall, 5-2 
in the ACL) is powered by 
senior Ted Walsh (10-10-20) 
and goalie Jeff Giordani (1 1 
games, 2.54 GAA). 

When the two teams meet 
on Saturday it will mark the 
first time the two city high 
schools have meet since last 
year's historic Division II 
South Sectional first round 
game. A game that saw the 
Red Raiders advance to the 
second round with a thriUing 
2-1 win in overtime. 

The teams will meet again 
for a second time on Feb. 1 3 
at the Quincy Youth Arena 
(6:50 p.m.). 




CRONIN'S PUBLnCK HOUSE bartender Ashley Connor and patrons Lee TIrrell and Stephen 
Knowles give each other celebratory high-flves after the New England Patriots advanced to 
play in Super Bowl XLII with a 21-12 win over the San Diego Chargers in the AFC Championship 
game. 




FANS OF THE Patriots enjoyed food and drinks durhig the AFC Championship game last 
Sunday at Cronin's Publick House. From left to right, Alissa Mermet, Jason Keenan, Rick 
Mooney, Jason White and Diana Millett celebrate after Wes Welker's nine-yard touchdown 
catch put New England up 21-12 late in the fourth quarter. Cronin's, located at 23 DesMomes 
Rd. in Quincy Point, will host its annual Super Bowl party on Feb. 3 with their special $.25 



wugs. 



Trish Bossart Photos 



Seniors Leading North Quincy Success This Season 



What a difference a year 
makes. 

The North Quincy Red 
Raiders, coming off a 
disappointing 5- 1 3 campaign 
in 2006-2007, have exploded 
back onto the local schoolboy 
basketball scene this winter. 
The Raiders enter Friday 
night's showdown against 
city rival Quincy High School 
with a 7-5 overall record and 
an impressive 5-3 record in 
the competitive Atlantic 
Coast League. 

And the difference this 
season, according to head 
coach Kevin Barrett, has been 
the senior leadership on the 
court and the experience his 
team gained during its up- 
and-down season a year ago. 

"The season has been full 
of positives," Barrett said 
earUer this week. "This year 
we have a senior laden team 
with tons of game experience 
that has been gained since 
last year. We have had a 
bunch of close games so far 
this year (no loss has been 
greater than seven points), 
and unlike last season when 
we would have folded in 
those pressure situations, we 
have thrived. 



"I think playing in so 
many close games last season 
has really started to pay off 
for us now. We have won 
two overtime games, and 
have a number of single digit 
wins. Even the games we 
have lost have been close and 
that is a good sign heading 
towards the postseason. It is 
a credit to the seniors." 

One of those seniors who 
have been excelling in all 
aspects of his game this year 
is forward Marcellus Lee. 

Lee, who is coming off a 
huge game against Dennis- 
Yarmouth High School (28 
points, 12 rebounds in the 
56-33 win) has been a 
certified monster on both 
ends of the court. His play 
with his back to the basket 
down low and his presence 
in the paint has allowed 
Barrett's team to spread the 
floor on offense and lock 
down on defense, and that is 
a credit to Lee. 

"Marcellus has been so 
much better this year for one 
reason, he has been so 
consistent," Barrett said. "He 
has been applying himself 
everyday in practice, 
showing up eariy and doing 



BOYS' BASKETBALL 



what needs to be done to be 
prepared for game situations . 
And we are seeing the results. 

"Most of his points are 
scored in the paint, but it is 
his offensive and defensive 
rebounding that has allowed 
for a better flow on offense 
and defense." 

Lee, who is among the 
leading scorers in the ACL's 
North Division with a 19.4 
points per game average, has 
also worked hard to improve 
his free throw shooting, a 
must for a big-man in 
basketball. 

"Marcellus' biggest 
adjustment has been his 
improvement at the free 
throw hne," added Barrett. 
"In the Dennis- Yarmouth 
game he was eight-for-nine 
from the line, and he has a 
number of games where he 
was almost perfect there. 

"He has woiked hard in 
practice, as has the whole 
team, at improving his game 
and what we have worked on 
is showing in games." 

Another senior who has 
made the jump this winter is- 



point guard Phuoc Nguyen. 
Nguyen went for ten points 
and seven assists in the 
Dennis- Yarmouth game, and 
it has been his aggressive yet, 
in control play at the point 
position that has opened up 
lanes for Lee and others. 

Nguyen has also cut down 
considerably on his 
tumovers, and his relentless 
pursuit on the defensive side 
of the court has improved 
also. 

"Phuoc, as our point 
guard, has played smart 
basketball, and that is what 
you want from that position," 
Barrett said. "His mmovers 
are down, assist are up and 
he has been making sound 
decisions distributing the 
basketball. As he goes so goes 
our team flow. 



'But 



ill i> 



biggest 



contributions usually come 
on the defensive end. He can 
be a pest to the other teams 
guards and his defense 
translates into easy baskets.' 
The Raiders picked up 
their second straight league 
"wintestPridaydan; !8)-with 



the aforementioned 56-33 
win over Dennis- Yarmouth 
(1-9 overall, 1-7 in ACL). 
The team's fifth league win 
puts them in a dogfight for 
first place with Quincy (8-3, 
5-2) and Plymouth North (9- 
2, 5-2) High Schools atop the 
ACL North Division. 

Lee (28 points, 12 
rebounds) and Nguyen (10 
points, 7 assists) powered the 
offense against the Dolphins, 
but it was the defense that 
took over the game. 

"Good win heading into 
the Quincy game," said 
Barrett. "Lee dominated like 
he has, and the team played 
solid 'D'." 

North Quincy knocked off 
Plymouth South (1-10, 1-7) 
for their sixth win on Jan. 15, 
59-50 to top last year's win 
total of five games. 

Forward Matt O'Neill led 
all North scores with 13 
points. He also finished the 
game with eight rebounds. 
Lee ended the game with ten 
points. 

Other players contributing 
included Jordan Thomson 
and Dennis Martin (first 
game back from an injury). 
" "We -played -weH -and 



spread the ball around," said 
Barrett. "It was good to get 
Dennis back. He got his feet 
wet at practice and came back 
against Plymouth South and 
played well. It was good to 
see." 

Next up for the Raiders is 
the first of two showdowns 
with the high-flying 
Presidents (Friday, 7 p.m., 
QHS' East Gym). 

Barrett knows that Quincy 
will be jacked-up and he 
expects his team to be the 
same. 

"High school basketball 
doesn't get much more 
exciting than this. That gym 
will be packed ( 1 ,500 people 
should not be a surprise), and 
it should be a great 
atmosphere." 

North will have to deal 
with Quincy guard Doug 
Scott (22.7 ppg) first and 
foremost, but Quincy can 
come at you from all sides. 

"Scott is one of the best 
players in Eastern 
Massachesutts. He can take 
over any game, but the rest of 
their roster is great, too. It 
should be fun." 

. . .By SEAN BRENNAN . . 




Pagc20 



■"** «* »»^ *t * i M^i|M|iM||tit t i|t| i tiiMMrf'ftftftf)Wtfr - 



Quincy Recreation Department Holds Elks ^Hoop Shot' Contest 




SIX LOCAL YOUNGSTERS were recently crowned "Hoop Shot" Free Throw Contest 
champioas. They are: front row from left, Kayleen Lenihan, Kyle Richardson and Kyle Murphy. 
Back row from left, Joanne Ruan, Jazsala Laracvente and Colin Evans. The contest is sponsored 
locally by the Quincy Lodge of Elks 943 with supervision from the Quincy Recreation Department 

R 





"HOOP SHOT" SECOND PLACE FINISHERS - Front row from left, Nathan Bock and 
(iabriela Jerahian. Back row form left, Tim Keenan, Sean HoUeran, Jillian Norrts and Breanne 
Norris. 



Over the Christmas school 
vacation week, six Quincy 
boys and girls, not only 
finished in first place in the 
City of Quincy Elks "Hoop 
Shot" Free Throw Contest, 
but all of them are also now 
one step closer to becoming 
national champions. 

The "Hoop Shot" 
competition, sponsored by 
the Quincy Lodge of Elks 
943, along with supervision 
from the Quincy Recreation 
Department, crowned 
champions from three 
different age categories. 

Some of the talented 
champions are also past 
winners in previous Quincy 
"Hoop Shot" finals. Colin 
Evans is making his fourth 
trip to the district 
championship, while 
Kayleen Lenihan and Joanne 
Ruan are making their second 
trip to the finals. Other 
champions for the 2007-2008 
event include Kyle Murphy 
in the 8-9 age group, and 
Jazsala Laracuente and Kyle 
Richardson in the 12-13 age 
group. 

All six of these City 
Champions competed in the 
Circle District Event on 
Saturday (Jan. 12) at the 
Marshfield High School 
Gymnasium. 

In this nationwide 
competition, over three 
million boys and girls are 
involved in the first level of 
shooting. This first level 



includes shooting twenty- 
five free throws, with the best 
shooters moving onto the 
next round. 

Former Mayor WiUiam 
Phelan, along with Joe 
McRichie of the QRD staff, 
presented trophies to all the 
champions and finalists at the 
City Championship. 

The QRD directed this 
event in partnership with the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks 943 
under their Exhaulted Ruler, 
Paul Treacy, and according 
to Barry J. Welch, director of 
recreation, "The free throw 
contest is just one example 
of the membership of the 
Quincy Elks reaching into 
the community to contribute 
to the quality of life of youth 
growing up in Quincy. We 
are always thankful of their 
generosity." 

The runner-ups in each 
age category who were 
awarded second-place 
trophies were Gabriela 
Jarahian and Nathan Bock in 
the 8-9 age group; Breanne 
Norris and Sean HoUeran in 
the 10-11 age group; and Jill 
Norris and Tim Keenan in 
the 12-13 age group. 

Third-place trophies were 
awarded to Bridget Durgin 
and Quinlin Evans in the 8-9 
age group; Lily Keener and 
Joao Barbosa in the 10-11 
age group; and Anna Dow 
and Matt Deagle in the 1 2- 1 3 
age group. 

Other girls and boys who 



won their local gym contests 
were Abbey Ryan, Nina 
McDonald, Kate 

McCormack and Erin Turner 
in the girls age 8-9 category; 
Devyn Lenson-Coy, Michael 
McNelley, Steven 

McCormack, Conor Porter, 
Chris Mann, WiUiam Phelan, 
Anthony Debello and Frank 
Wahlberg in the boys age 8- 
9 category; Hannah 
Donovan, Rachel Lunny, 
Kerry Phelan, Mary Duggan 
and Tristine Thong in the girls 
age 10-11 category; Abhay 
Shukla, Matt Wong, James 
Lam, Mike Saccoach, Aaron 
Broder, Joe Cochrane, Eddie 
Riley, Dashawn Pires and 
Tom Wahlberg in the boys 
age 10-11 category; Taylor 
McKay, Haley McKay, 
Alexis McKay, Jonlyn 
Lydon, KeUy Youino, Samah 
Marhamo and Rachel 
DeMehn in the girls age 12- 
13 category and Gerson Lai, 
David Lawlor, Alex Bottari, 
Zack McLaren, Sasha 
Cunningham, Steve Beaton, 
Steven Quinn and Alex Ngan 
in the boys age 12-13 
category. 

Welch praised his 
Recreation Leaders who 
supervised the event at each 
of the Center Championships 
at the thirteen different school 
locations, along with the 
finalists and he thanked, Ed 
Miller of the Elks Lodge, who 
served as "Hoop Shot" 
chairman. 



gUINCY 




Quincy/North Quincy Track 
Has Success At State Relays 



"HOOP SHOT" THIRD PLACE FINISHERS - Front row fktMn left, Bridget Durgiii, Joao 
Carlos BartNna and Qninlan Evans. Back row fonn Ml, Matthew Deagle, Lily Keener and 
Annie Dow. 

Soccer SkiUs Program Starts Jan. 28 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department announces that 
it will hold an eight-week 
Soccer Skills program for 
girls as part of the 
department's evening 
recreation gyro program. 

This program will feature 
activities and instruction to 
improve the fundamental 
soccer skills of each 
youngster, according to 
Barry J. Wckh, Director of 
Recreation. The participants 
will also take part in miai- 
ganies. 

The Soccer Skills 
program b^ins Monday. Jm. 
28 and will continue for tbe 



next seven Mondays and the 
skiU sessions will have two 
separate periods of 
programming. From 5:30-7 
p.m. the program is for girls 
in Gra(tes S-7, and from 7- 
8:30 p.m. the program wiU 
be for girls in Grades 8-11. 
Both programs will be t^ld 
at the Broad Meadows 
Middle School Gymnasium. 
50 Calvin Rd. 

Don Martin, bead coach 
of girls' soccer at Quincy 
High School will direct the 
jHDgrams. Members of ttie 
Recreation staff will as»st 
Coach Martin. 



Registration wiU be taken 
on the first night of the 
program and will be limited. 
After the registration period 
there wiU be a fuU program 
of soccer skills. 

The eight-week sessions 
wiU conclude on March 24, 
2008, and there wiU be do 
programs held on 
Presidents' Day, Feb. 18, 
2008. 

Participants are reqiwsted 
to wear sneakers and 
appropriate gym attire. 
AdditicMud information can 
be (^)tained by calling ttie 
QRD at 617-376-1394. 



The Quincy/North 
Quincy co-ed winter track 
team competed in the 
Division 1 State Relays last 
Saturday, Jan. 1, and the team 
had a number of impressive 
individual performances. 

The 4 X 800-meter relay 
team of Mary Schwartz, Erica 
Brady, CaitUn McCarthy and 
Alyssa Mullen finished in 
thirteenth place with a time 
of 10:24. 

Schwartz ran the fastest 
leg with a time of 2:30.1. 

In the distance medley, 
Quincy/North Quincy 
finished in eleventh place, 
with MuUen running a time 
of 3:58 for the 1200-meter 
leg, McCarthy a 70 seconds 
for the 400, Schwartz a time 
of 2:31 for the 800-meter, 
and Brady a time of 5:32 for 
the mile portion of the 
nwdley. 

According to Q/NQ head 
coach, Geoff Hennessy, this 
team of runners is trying to 
reach the Nationals' 
qualifying staiMlard of 12:45 
by the end of February. 

Schwartz, Brady and 
MuUen wiU soon team up 
witii teanunate Jess Davis to 
cooop^e in the 4 X %)0-meters 
and possibly die Distance 
Medley at the Bob Mclntyre 
Elite Relays on Jan. 27 at the 
Reggie Lewis Trade Cemta 
inBostouL 



The Quincy/North 
Quincy freshmen and 
sophomores took part in the 
Paul Davey Invitational at 
Franklin High School on 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 
last Monday, and, once again, 
Schwartz was an individual 
standout. 

Schwartz finished first in 
the girls' 1000-meterrunwith 
apersonal best timeof 3:18.1. 

Freshmen Nick Gillespie 
broke the six-minute barrier 
in the one-mile for the first 
time, clocking in at 5:58.7 
and Neny Francois threw a 
personal best in the girls' shot 
put with a distance of 23'04" 
feet. 

Quincy/North Quincy vs. 
Whitman-Hanson H.S. 

The Quincy/North 
Quincy girls' winter indoor 
track team may have lost to 
Whitman-Hanson High 
School, one of the premier 
track programs in the state, 
82- 1 8 on Jan. 1 6 at the Reggie 
Lewis Track Center in 
Boston, but the final score 
was not reflective of the 
team's overaU performance, 
according to head coach 
Geoff Hennessy. 

Quincy/Noitii Quincy had 
a number of ranners who 
himed in outstanding races. 
In die one-mile event, Alyssa 
Mullen, con]^ting in the 



mile for the first time, placed 
first with a time of 5:29.9. 

Erica Brady finished in 
second place in the 1000- 
meters with a finishing time 
of 3:16, while teammate 
Mary Schwartz took second 
place in the 600-meters with 
a time of 1 :47, well under the 
state-quaUfying standard. 

Others runners standing 
out against Whitman-Hanson 
included Mabel Setow, Jenn 
Nahn and Erin Collins. 

Setow ran her fastest time 
ever in the 300-meters, 
finishing in a time of 50.6 
seconds, but did not place. 
Nhan clocked in at 10.49 
seconds in the 100-meter 
hurdles, finishing in third 
place, and Collins continued 
her undefeated season in the 
shot put event, finishing first 
with a throw of 27'7" feet. 

The boys' team lost to 
Whitman-Hanson 76-24. 

Jeff Pereira won the 55- 
meter hurdles with a time of 
eight seconds flat, and Paul 
Reamer finished first in the 
long jump with a distance of 
18-2 feet. 

Next up for Quincy/North 
Quincy coed team is the 
Mclntyre Ehte Relays on Jan. 
27, followed by a duel meet 
against NorweU Hi^ School 
(» Jan. 31 at die Reggie Lewis 
Center. 



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21 Bullring cry 


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23 Kyoto 


covers 


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6 Old man in 


50 


Chopping 


24 Grooved on 


the family 




tool 


25 Indivisible 


12 Charm 


52 Vent 


26 Genius 


13 Start the 


54 Contribute 


personified 


computer 


55 


Pact 


28 Home of the 


again 


56 True 


Ringling 


14 Eye part 


57 Watts or 


Circus 


15 Amass 




Previn 


Museum 


16 Rams fans? 






30 Cartoonist's 


17 PoetAngelou 


DOWN 


supply 


19 Prior to 


1 


Variety of 


31 Omega 


20 Lids 




duck 


preceder 


22 D.C. figure 


2 


Just adorable 


33 Afternoon 


24 Fawn's 


3 


Definite 


affair 


mama 




invitees 


34 X rating? 


27 Mainlanders' 


4 


Stein or 


39 Long skirts 


mementos 




Stiller 


41 Put on a 


29 Radar dot 


5 


Wild onrush 


show 


32 NYC-based 


6 


Anatomy 


42 Opulent 


organization 




man 


43 Dos cubed 


35 Hereditary bit 


7 


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45 Refined chap 


36 Green land 


8 


Where "Lost" 


47 Winged 


37 Tackle 




is found 


48 Sampras or 


moguls 


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38 'X^asablanca" 


10 


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49 Messy 


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buckets 


environment 


40 Singer 


11 


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51 Mimic 


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12 


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53 Grecian 


42 Deteriorate 


18 


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C 2008 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOFF 




Find at least six differences in detals between panels, s 




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Sir Albert Howard (1873-1947), 

a British botanist, is often referred 

to as the father of modem organic 

F^Wfl agriculture. He went to India to 

\(*j /C/ teach Western agricultural techniques, 

but instead adopted their culture's 

nature-based approaches to 

fanning (such as composting). 

His work and writings 

influenced many to further 

develop organic methods. 




e 2006 by King FMturM SyndlcaM, inc. Wortd right* raM>v«d. 

EMMY FOR LEAD 

MAGIC MAZE # actor - comedy 

SERIES 

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Adams Danson Hirsch 

AkJa Durante Klugman 

Benny Gervais Lithgow 

Caesar Grammar Mulligan 

02006 King Feature* Syndicate, Inc. 



Rittar 

Romano 

Shalhoub 




Trivid 




1 . FOOD & DRINK: What 
kind of food is a morel? 

2. LANGUAGE: What 
does the acronym "sonar" 
stand for? 

3. HISTORY: Who were 
the two heavyweight fight- 
ers who participated in the 
1975 "Thrilla in Manila" 
championship? 

4. ANATOMY: What is the 
more common name for the 
tibia? 

5. COMICS: What was the 
name of Bazooka Joe's girl- 
friend? 

6. MOVIES: What was the 
name of the moon inhabited 
by the Ewoks in "Return of 
theJedi"? 

7. MUSIC: What are the 
names of the Gibbs brothers 
who made up The Bee 
Gees? 

Klno-Crossvvord 

Answers — — ^— 



8. GEOGRAPHY: What is 
the capital of the Cayman 
Islands? 

9. GENERAL KNOWL- 
EDGE: Who works at 10 
Downing Street in London? 

10. MEDICINE: What dis- 
ease does the drug quinine 
treat? 

Answers 

1. Mushroom 

2. Sound navigation and 
ranging 

3. Muhanmied All and Joe 
Frazicr 

4.Shinbone 

S.Zena 

6.Endor 

7. Maurice, Robin and 
Bany 

8. George Town 

9. British prime minister 

10. Malaria 

e 2008 King Feaniru Synd., Inc. 



Magic Maze 
"~ Answers~~ 



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Quincy Typewriter Service 




Bob Barker Gerry Barker 

WINTER SPECIAL 

IBM Selectrics Reconditioned 

Starting at $229^ and up while they last! 

5 Maple Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 617-472-3656 



SUirs 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) Guess what. Lamb? 
You're about to experience a 
new perspective on a situa- 
tion you long regarded quite 
differently. What you leara 
could open more opportuni- 
ties later. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) The Bold Bovine is 
tempted to charge into a new 
venture. But it might be best 
to take things one step at a 
time, so that you know just 
where you are at any given 
point. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) It's a good time to go on 
that fim getaway you've been 
planning. You'll return 
refreshed, ready and, yes, 
even eager to tackle the new 
challenge that awaits you. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) The Moon Child loves to 
fantasize about magical hap- 
penings in the early part of 
the week. But the sensible 
Crab gets down to serious 
business by week's end. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
What goes around comes 
around for those lucky Leos 
and Leonas whose acts of 
generosity could be repaid 
with opportunities to expand 
into new and exciting areas of 
interest. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) Your concern 
about your job responsibili- 
ties is commendable. But you 
need to take some quiet time 
to share with someone who 
has really missed being with 
you. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 



October 22) Aspects favor 
getting out and meeting new 
people. And as a bonus, you 
might find that some of your 
newly made friends could 
offer important business con- 
tacts. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) You might 
take pride in wanting to do 
everything yourself. But 
now's a good time to ask 
family members to help with 
a demanding personal situa- 
tion. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem- 
ber 22 to December 21) Pay 
more attention to the possi- 
bilities in that workplace 
change. It could show the 
way to make that long-sought 
turn on your career path. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 19) Your need 
to succeed might overwhelm 
obligations to your loved 
ones. Ease up on that work- 
load and into some well- 
deserved time with family 
and friends. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Love rules for 
amorous Aquarians who can 
make good use of their ability 
to communicate feelings. 
Don't be surprised if they're 
reciprocated in kind. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Fishing for com- 
pliments? No doubt, you 
probably earned them. But 
it's best to let others believe 
they were the ones who 
uncovered the treasure you 
really arc. 

BORN THIS WEEK: 
Your good works flow from 
an open, generous heart. 
Nothing makes you happier 
than to see others happy as 
weU. 

O 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Wishing $ Well® 



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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that wiH give you a 
message every day. it's a numerical puzzle designed to speN 
out your fortune. Count the letters In your first name. If the 
numl)er of letters is 6 or more, sutitract 4. If the numtwr is less 
than 6, add 3. The result is your key numt>ef . Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer arnJ check or>e of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

O2008 King F«rtur«t Syndicalt. Inc 



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Cl^lTtJAI^IES 



Ann I. Plant, 66 

Administrative Assistant 



A funeral Mass for Ann I. 
(Paluzzi) Plant. 66, of East 
Bridgewater, formerly of 
West Quincy, an administra- 
tive assistant, was celebrated 
Monday in Saint Mary's 
Church, 95 Crescent St., 
West Quincy. 

Mrs. Plant died Jan. 16 at 
home after a long illness. 

Bom in Quincy, she was 
raised in West Quincy and 
attended West Quincy 
schools. She was a I960 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

Mrs. Plant had lived in 
West Quincy for most of her 
life before moving to Ea.st 
Bridgewater nine years ago. 
She was employed as an 
administrative assistant for 
Tufts Healthcare for several 
years. She had also worked 
for American Automobile 
Association and had been 
retired for five years. 

She loved and enjoyed her 
family, especially her grand- 
children and great-grandchil- 
dren. 

She was the beloved wife 
for 45 years of William E. 
Plant St. and the devoted 
mother of William Plant, Jr., 
Quincy Police Department, 
and his wife Linda of 
Quincy; Christopher Plant 
and his wife Carol of 
Holbrook, Patrick Plant and 
his wife Deborah of East 
Bridgewater, Sherri Andrews 
and her husband Mark of 
Raynham, Neal Plant and his 
wife Laura of Weynaouth, 
Nicole Plant of Abington, 





ANN I. PLANT 

Denise Collins and her hus- 
band Keith of Raynham and 
Dennis Plant and his wife 
Christine of Plymouth. 

She is also survived by 
five brothers, Joseph Paluzzi 
of Braintree, Daniel Paluzzi 
of Stoughton, George 
Paluzzi of Brockton, Albert 
Paluzzi of Marshfield and 
Anthony Paluzzi of Ply- 
mouth; two sisters, PhyUis 
Bagen of Quincy and Cecelia 
Blair of Marshfield; and 19 
grandchildren, two great- 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

She was also the daughter 
of the late Albert and Eleanor 
(CeUini) Paluzzi. 

Interment was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy Center. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Dana Farber 
Cancer Institute, 10 
Brookline Place West. 6th 
Floor, Brookline, MA 
02445-7226. 



Helen T. Thibaut 

Manager For New England Telephone 

A funeral Mass for Helen 
T. (Connolly) Thibaut of 
Wollaston, a retired manager 
for New England Telephone 
Co., was celebrated Jan. 16 
at St. Agatha Church in 
Milton. 

" Mrs. Thibaut died at home 
Jan. 13. 

She grew up in Dorchester 
and had been a Wollaston 
resident for many years. 

A graduate of Burdett Col- 
lege, Boston, she retired in 
1985 from her position as 
manager for New England 
Telephone and Telegraph, 
Boston. 

Mrs. Thibaut was a past 
president and active member 
of the Telephone Pioneers of 
America. 

She was also a former 
member of the Quincy 
Neighborhood Club. 

The beloved wife of 58 
years of Joseph J. Thibaut of 
Wollaston, she is also sur- 
vived by her sister, Katherine 
C. McKeon of Quincy and 



Gregory J. Cannon, 50 

Consultant 



HELEN T. THIBAUT 

many nieces and nephews. 

She was the sister of the 
late Ann Connolly and the 
late Margaret M. Manning. 

Interment was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred D. 
Thomas Funeral Home, 326 
Granite Ave., Milton. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to St. Agatha 
Church Renovation Fund, 
432 Adams St., Milton, MA 
02186 or Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay State 
Dr., Braintree, MA 02 185. 



Allan J. MacKay, 76 

Retired MBTA Electrician 



A memorial visitation for 
Gregory J. Cannon, 50, of 
Quincy, a consultant, was 
held Jan. 16 i^t the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 
St., Wollaston. 

Mr. Cannon died Jan. 12 
at Beth Israel Deaconess 
Medical Center in Boston. 

In his youth, he played 
many years with the Natick 
Comets. He was the captain 
of hockey and lacrosse teams 
in Nicholas College. He 
holds the dual county league 
record for the two fastest 
hockey goals. 

Mr. Cannon enjoyed golf- 
ing, fishing and NASCAR. 
He also enjoyed entertaining 
and was a most generous 
host. 

He was the beloved hus- 
band of 25 years of Carol 
Beers Cannon of Quincy and 
the son of Earl and Elaine 
Cannon of Plymouth. 

He was the brother of 
Dennis and Jean Cannon of 
Merrimac, N.H., Richard 
and Betty Cannon of 
Bridgewater and Christine 
and Ed Dixson of Scituate 
and the brother-in-law of 




GREGORY J. CANNON 

Eric and Jennifer Beers of 
Quincy and Lisa Beers of 
Florida. 

He was also the son-in- 
law of Richard Beers of 
Florida and the late Mary 
Beers. 

He is also survived by 
many nieces, nephews and 
godchildren. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Mutual Funds 
Against Cancer. All dona- 
tions benefit the Center for 
AppUed Cancer Sciences at 
Dana-Farber Cancer Insti- 
tute. Their program empha- 
sizes research for six major 
cancer types, one of which is 
pancreatic cancer. 



ATkot/etfT 



SCOTT DEWARE 



^^^|l^ A^ A wise person once said, ''Nothing 
^^^fr^^^^ more is needed to make a man un- 
^^^Hj^^^^H happy tlian to bdieve he is." . . . 
^^^Bjj^^^^H Through tlie years, we all liaye 
m^Bj^^^^l made mistakes. We all have had cer- 
tain liabits, moods, fears and feelings 
of guilt wliich liave kept us restless 
and unliappy at certain times. Yet it 
is possible to turn from the inadequate and unhappy things 
of life and begin living a new Itfe. This can be done by 
deciding we are through with unhappiness. . . we are going 
to cast unhappiness behind us. . . 

TRUE . . . there is some unhappiness that can never be 
cast aside, but some of it can . . . TRUE ... we need constantly 
to remind ourselves that we can be about as happy as we 
make up our mhids to be . . . TRUE . . . circumstances play 
a part in our U vcs - but isn ' t it also true that will power and 
faith play an fanportant part? ... TRUE ... it is never too late 
to change. Hiis has become a truth so (rflen repeated that it 
batmiBm. 

CooMbU It be saM that happtaicas caa be omv iHicn we 
arc supported by this hope and corfidence? . . . 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
WoUaston Chapel 
576 Hanccx:k Street 
Quincy. MA 02170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability nus Service 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 

A Service Famly AffiUate cf AFFS mtd Service Corp. bit. 

^92 Rock Street •FaU River. HA 02720 •(508) 676-2454 



Private funeral services 
were held for Allan J. 
MacKay, 76, of Quincy, a 
retired electrician, who died 
Jan. 15 at home after a brief 
illness. 

Bom and raised in Quincy, 
he was educated in Quincy 
schools and was a graduate 
of Quincy Trade School. He 
was a hfelong Quincy resi- 
dent. 

Mr. MacKay was em- 
ployed as an electrician for 
the MBTA for 30 years. He 
worked in the Signal Divi- 
sion in Boston and retired in 
1994. 

He was a member of Lo- 
cal 103 IBEW. 

Mr. MacKay was a life 



member of the Quincy Yacht 
Club and enjoyed sailing. 

He is survived by his wife 
of 48 years, Joan L. (Clarke) 
MacKay; his son James A. 
D. MacKay and his wife 
Sandra of Fall River; a sis- 
ter, Shirley M. Hall of 
Braintree; one grandchild 
and many nieces and neph- 
ews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funerals, 
1 Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Hospice of 
Boston and Greater 
Brockton, 500 Belmont St., 
Brockton, MA 02301. 



Patricia A. Timmons, 37 

Homemaker 




Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



Private funeral services 
were held for Patricia A. 
(Jacobs) Timmons, 37, of 
Houghs Neck, a homemaker, 
at the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave., Quincy. 

Mrs. Tijimions died sud- 
denly Jan. 14 at the Thomas 
Jefferson Hospital in Phila- 
delphia, PA. 

Bom in Houghs Neck, she 
was raised in Quincy and at- 
tended Quincy schools. She 
had Uved in Quincy for most 
of her Ufe. 

Mrs. Tinmions loved mu- 
sic, as an avid reader and was 
devoted to her children and 
home schooUng. 

She was a member of the 



Houghs Neck American Le- 
gion Post #380 AuxiUary. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Mark D. 
Timmons,; three children, 
Mark David, Abigail and Jo- 
seph Timmons; her parents, 
Cathy A. (Brown) Benson of 
Beaufort, S.C. and )^Uiam 
J. Jacobs, Quincy Fire De- 
partment, retired, of C^uincy ; 
one grandchildren, several 
aunts and uncles and a dear 
friend, David Ebner. 

Interment was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to a charity of 
choice. 



Betty C. Dow 

Retired Secretary 



A memorial service for 
Betty C. Dow of Quincy, a 
retired secretary, will be held 
today (Thursday) at 1 1 a.m. 




J)igEit,y" 



Funerals • Cremations • Prearrangements 




DENNIS SWEENEY FUNERAL HOME 

Quincy *s First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney 

Funeral Director 
74 Elm Street, Quincy Massachusetts 02169 • 617-773-2728 

www.dennissweeDeyfuneraUiome.com 



in the Pyne Keohane Funeral 
Home, 21 Emerald St., 
Hingham. 

Miss Dow died Jan. 12. 

She was a hfelong Quincy 
resident. 

She served in the U.S. 
Navy during World War n. 

She retired after 30 years 
of service as a secretary for 
the U.S. Government 

She was the daughter of 
the late Kenneth R. and Jane 
E. (Appleyard) Dow, the sis- 
ter of Kenneth H. Dow and 
his wife Baifoara of Hingham 
and the aunt of Stacy Dow 
of Hingham. 

Burial will be private. 

Dtmatiofis may be made to 
a charity of chcnce. 



RobertA.Arey,Sr.,89 

Federal Contract Inspector 



Patricia M. Jacobs, 96 

Inspector At Gillette Co. 



A funeral Mass for Rob- 
ert A. Arey, Sr., 89, of 
Quincy, a retired contract in- 
spector for the federal gov- 
ernment, was celebrated Jan. 
19 in St. Mary's Church, 
West Quincy. 

Mr. Arey died Jan. 15 at 
the Quincy Rehabilitation 
and Nursing Center. 

Bom, raised and educated 
in Somerville, he graduated 
from Somerville High 
School and attended Lxjwell 
Institute at MIT. 

A veteran, he served in the 
Army during World War 11 in 
the Pacific Theater. 

Mr. Arey worked as a tool 
and die maker, then a con- 




ROBERT A. AREY, SR. 

of Berwick, ME; Dr. Anne 
Marie Arey of Lee's Summit, 
MO; Vu-ginia Hueras and her 
husband Jon of Chelmsford; 



tract inspector for the federal Karen Arey-MacKay and her 



government for 35 years be- 
fore retiring. 

He was a member of the 
VFW Carter Post, Needham, 
NARFE Chapter 430, Mt. 
Pleasant Knights of Colum 



husband Richard of Pem- 
broke; Brenda Grane of 
Trabuco Canyon, CA and 
Robert A. Arey, Jr. and his 
wife Deborah of Tcwksbury. 
He is also survived by his 



A funeral Mass for 
Patricia M. (Michalkewicz) 
Jacobs, 96, of Quincy, a re- 
tired inspector of blades for 
the Gillette Co. in Boston, 
was celebrated Wednesday 
in Saint Ann's Church, 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Jacobs died Jan. 19 
at the William B. Rice Even- 
tide Nursing Home in 
Quincy. 

She had lived in Cam- 
bridge before moving to 
Quincy 31 years ago. 

Mrs. Jacobs worked as an 
inspector for Gillette for 35 
years. She retired in 1968. 

Wife of the late James 
Jacobs, she is survived by her 
daughter Patricia and her 
husband Anthony Pettinelli 
of Braintree; her daughter 
Janice Jacobs and her hus- 
band Mark Dolansky of 
Newport Beach; two grand- 




PATRICIA M. JACOBS 

children and four great- 
grandchildren. 

She was also the brother 
of the late Walter Michaels. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock 



Robert A. Campbell, 67 

Litigation Support Photographer 

A funeral Mass for Rob- 
ert A. Campbell, 67, of 
Quincy, a litigation support 
photographer, was cel- 
ebrated Tuesday in Saint 
Mary's Church, West 
Quincy. 

Mr. Campbell died Jan. 17 
at Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

Bom, raised and educated 
in Boston, he was a 1959 
graduate of Maiden Cathohc 
High School. 

He had lived in Quincy for 
38 years. 

Mr. Campbell was a liti- 
gation support photographer 
for Conunercial Wharf Asso- 
ciates in Boston which he 
founded in 1983 and where 




St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may he worked for 24 years 
be made to the Marge 
Crispin Center Daycare, 74 
Pond St., Braintree, MA 
02184. 



ROBERT A. CAMPBELL 

Norwell, his daughter Lisa 
A. Galluzzo and her husband 
Angelo of Braintree and six 
grandchildren. 

He is also the beloved 
brother of William Campbell 
of FL, Richard CanQ4>bell of 



A golf enthusiast, he was Cohassct, John Campbell of 

a member of South Shore Mansfield, James Campbell 

Country Club in Hingham of North Andover and the 

and had been its recent past late Joseph Campbell and 



bus, St. Mary's Senior Citi- brother. Paul Arey of NJ, his 

zens. where he served as sisters, Doris McDougall and 

treasurer for 13 years and Clara Stupackawicz, both of 

was a past president of the ME; and 14 grandchildren 

St. Mary's Holy Name Soci- 2"^ one great-grandchild. 
^p. Burial was in St. Mary's 

He is survived by his be- Cemetery. 



Edward G. Linsley, 64 

Manager 



loved wife of 65 years, Helen 
V. (Singleton) Arey; his chil- 
dren, Frances Reifenstahl 
and her husband Dean of 
Westfield, Dr. Janet Arey and 



A funeral service for Ed- 
ward G. Linsley, 64, of 
Quincy, a manager for the 
Lexington Insurance Com- 
pany in Boston, was held 



Funeral arrangements 

were made by the Dennis Wednesday at the Keohane 

Sweeney Funeral Home, 73 p^„^^ j^ome, 785 Hancock 

Elm St., Quincy Center. g^ WoUaston. 

Memorial donations may Mr. Linsley died Jan. 19 

her husband Roger Atkinson ^ made to the St. Mary's ^j Quincy Medical Center, 

of Riverside, CA; Linda Building Fund, 115Crescent g^^ ^ ^j^^y j^ Y., he 
Wheeler and her husband Al St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Camille Horkun, 93 

Retired Mlt Lab Technician 



A memorial Mass is 
planned for a later date for 
Camille (DiCarlo) Horkun, 



She received many cita- 
tions for her volunteerism. 
Mrs. H(»kun made an ana- 



had lived in Atlanta, Georgia, 
before moving to Quincy 12 
years ago. , . .. / 

Mr. Linsley worked as a 
manager in die Underwriting 
Resources Department for 
Lexington Insurance Com- 



93, of Quincy, a retired lab tomical gift to Tufts Univer- pany in Boston for 12 years. 



technician at MIT. Mrs 
Horicun died Jan. 10 at Pope 
Nursing Home in 
Weymouth. 

She was bom and raised 
in Revere before moving to 
Quincy. 

She was a seamstress for 
many years, working in the 
garment industry in Boston 



sity School of Medicine. 

She was the beloved 
mother of Alexis (Horkun) 
Solimini and her husband. 



He served in the U.S. 
Navy from 1961 to 1%5. 

He was an avid golfer, 
loved to cook and traveled 



Vinnie of South Weymouth, extensively, for work and 



and the late Carole (Horkun) 
(josselin Gaedtke. 

She was the loving sister 
to Marilyn Nestor, Sarah 
Cobban, Mildred DiCarlo 



and several sportswear shops and Louise Merrill of Quincy 



in Quincy until she went to 
work and retired from MIT 
as a lab technician in 1979. 

Mrs. Hoikun was active in 
the early days of DOVE. 

Hard of hearing, she 



and brother Fred DiCarlo of 
Milton. 

She was also the sister of 
the late Angie Contrino, 
Mike DiCarlo, Joseph 
DiCarlo and Sully DiCarlo 



would speak on behalf of the the devoted daughter of the 



Boston Guild for the Hard of 
Hearing to different organi- 
zations. 

She did much volunteer 
work after she retired within 
the City of Quincy, working 
at Quincy Hospital, City Hall 
and finally the bookkeeping 
department at the Quincy 
Court House until 2(X)4. 



late Louise and Joseph 
DiCarlo. 
She is also survived by 1 1 



pleasure. 

Mr. Linsley was also an 
organ donor. 

He is survived by his lov- 
ing con[q)anion, Linda Miller 
of Quincy, a daughter, Kim- 
berly Ann Linsley of Atlanta, 
GA; a son, Brian Edward 
Linsley of Los Angeles, CA; 

Seek Medical 
Gear To Loan 

The Council on Aging is 
seeking donations of medi- 
cal equipment that is no 



grandchildren, 23 great- longer needed by the current 
grandchildren and 3 great- owner but can be loaned to 
great-grandchildren; and someone else, 
many nieces and nephews. The present highest prior- 
Memorial donations may ity is given to bath transfer 
be made to a charity of seats. Call 617-376-1506. 
choice. 



Bible Study Series On The Psalms 
Begins Feb. 7 At Houghs Neck Church 



Houghs Neck Congrega- ries. 
tional Qiurch will oflFer a six- "Many have said that the 

week Bible study program Book of Psalms covers just 

focusing on the Book of about every emotion - from 

Psalms beginning Feb. 7. utter praise to deep despair. 

The series will continue from confident faith in God 

each Thursday during Lent to struggles with God's pres- 

from 7 to 8 p.m. at the church ence in the Psahnist's life," 

parsonage's Gordon Room, said Pastor Jc^ Castricum, 

300 Manet Ave. All are wel- who stressed that no prior 
come to attend the free se- 



knowledge of the Bible is 
needed to participate. 

"We encourage anyone 
who is interested in learning 
a little more about their faith 
to come join us." 

The Gordon Room is 
handicapped accessible. For 
more information, call 617- 
479-8778. 




president. 

Mr. Campbell was also a 
member of Red Sox Nation 
and the Sons of Italy in 
Weymouth. 

The beloved husband of 
Elaine M. (DePaolo) 
Campbell, he was the be- 
loved son of Mary Campbell 
of Quincy and the late Will- 
iam Campbell. 



many nieces and iiq)hews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St., Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Panos Fidias, 
MD Cancer Research Fund, 
Mass General Hospital, De- 



He is also survived by his velopment Office, 1 65 Cam- 
son Robert A. Campbell, Jr. bridge St., Suite 600, Boston, 
and his wife Natalie of MA 021 14-2792. 

COA In Need Of Bath Seats 



EDWARD G. LINSLEY 

and a sister, Barbara Noble 
of Albany, N.Y. 

He was also the brother of 
the late' Carol Favor. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the South Shore 
Hospital Foundation, Car- 
diac Care Center, 55 Fogg 
Rd., Weymouth, MA 02189. 



The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need for bath seats 
for senior citizens. 



If you have one to donate, 
call the COA at 617-376- 
1245. 



Arrangements 

Living Beauty 
326 FRANKUN STREET, QUINCY ♦ 617-479-2020 




Granclma loved 
classic poetry, 
traveling, 
and Grandpa,, 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Ser\'ice, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's reading classic poetry or 

compiling a memory 
board of her favorite 
travel photos, you can 
count on us to help 
you plan a service that 
will be just as unique as the person you love. 



ifiSi 




^oUano funeral SeMco 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 

Member by Invitation Q^i/ National Selected Morticians 




j'i^'i \si.H-^.'*'JKjifJfkglfi" Ji^^i*,I^Vtaun*f'y«A^VH#f^ 



K^ELieiCN 



Quincy Special Education 
lyansportation Meeting Saturday 



Feast Of St Clirysostom Sunday 
At St. Chrysostom's Episcopal Church 



St. Chrysostom's Episco- Immediately following 

pal Church, 1 Linden St., the celebration of their pa- 

Wollaston, will celebrate the tron saint, brunch will be 

annual "Feast of St. served and the parish will 

Chrysostom" at the 10 a.m. conduct their annual parish 

liturgy Sunday, Jan. 27. meeting. 



The Rev. David Hefling. 
rector, will give a "state of 
the parish" report and Ves- 



The Quincy Parents Ad- 
visory Counsel to Special 
Education (QPAC) will host 
a meeting Saturday, Jan. 26 
from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Ward 
4 Conununity Center, 100 
Brooks Ave., Quincy. 

The meeting provides a 



Education students to ad- 
dress their concerns about 
transportation services pro- 
vided to their children. 

There will also be an op- 
portunity to review the cur- 
rent bus drivers' and moni- 
tors' contracts. Both con- 



actively involved with the 
renegotiating of their exten- 
sions, QPAC i^)preciates pa- 
rental input. 

Anyone interested in at- 
tending the meeting, has 
questions or would like to be 
added to QPAC's e-mail list 



Quincy Point Congregational 



Plans are underway for 
the Quincy Point Congrega- 
tional Church fourth annual 
Mardi Gra.s Saturday, Feb. 2 
from 6 to 9 p.m. 

There will be dinner, a si- 
lent auction, dancing, and the 
Crowning of the King and 



Queen of Mardi Gras. Tick- The Rev. Ann G. Suzedell 

ets can be purchased from will give the sermon "He 
the church office by calling Brought His Brother." She 

will be accompanied by the 



617-773-6424 

All ages welcome. The 
event is alcohol-free. 

This Sunday, the worship 
service begins at 10 a.m. 



try officers and other mem- forum for parents and/or tracts are up for renewal this should contact Linda Perry at 

bcrs for the coming year will guardians of Quincy Special year and as QPAC will be 617-773-1 385. 

^ ^^^^' Bethany Congregational Church 

Bethany Congregational vice and preach a sermon en- ship time in the Allen Parlor. 

Church, 18 Spear St., Quincy titled "Upward Road or Light refreshments will be 

Center, will have a Worship Backsliding." served. 
Service and Church School Childcare is available for ^li are welcome, 

at 10 a.m. infants and toddlers. jhe church is handi- 

The Rev. William C. Following the worship capped accessible. 

Harding will conduct the ser- service, there will be fellow- 



deacon of the day, Adam 
McGhee and Jean Kane as 
the lay reader. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



First Church Of Squantum 



The First Church of less half of the book) of The 
Squantum. 1 64 Bellevue Rd. Golden Notebook, written by 

the 2007 Nobel Prize winner 



announces its Book Club 
will meet Tuesday. Feb. 5 at 
7 p.m. in the church parlor. 
The book selection is the 
first three chapters (more or 



Tuesday mornings at 9:30 
a.m. in the main floor of the 
Sunday School room. 

For more information, 
call the church office at 61 7- 
328-6649. 



The Houghs Neck Con- tor John Castricum will de- 

gregational Church, 310 Hver his sermon "Seven 

Manet Ave., Quincy, will Deadly Sins: Pride." 
hold a Family Day Service Scripture is from Luke 



church school members Ali- 
cia and Erica Amato. 

Fellowship coffee hour 
will follow the service 



Medical transportation 
with curb to curb service 
Mondays through Fridays is 
provided at no cost to Quincy 
seniors. 



in literature, Doris Lessing. 
The Fiber Arts Group, 
which is open to women in- 
terested in handcrafts, meets 

Free Senior Medical Trips 

The service requires two major hospitals in Boston, 
weeks notice for trips, in- To request a trip, call the 

eluding those to Braintree Transportation Office at 617- 

Hospital. Carney Hospital, 376-1242 
Milton Hospital and eight 



Sunday at 9: 30 a.m. chapter 1 8 verses 9- 1 4. Serv- hosted by Anne Baxendale 

Everyone will attend the jng for the Diaconate will be and her sister Helen Miller, 
service in the sanctuary. Pas- 

Quincy Community United Methodist 



Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston, will 
have Sunday worship and 



at 9 a.m. Joanne Nolan. 

The lector will be Ardys All are welcome. The 

Peterson. Ushers are Kelly church is handicapped acces- 

Cobble and William sible. 



Sunday school beginning at Morrissey. 
10:30 a.m. Coffee hour hosts are 

Adult Bible study begins Dottie Hahn, Joan Honig and 



For more information, call 
the church at 617-773-3319. 



A^mbi^ 



S'Sod 



1 58Waishin$on bt.TQuincy 
phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship: w.aoa.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Conteniporary Worship 
W •Marriage & Family Group 
■I •International Fellowship 




wmmmmmmm 



MillllWI 



iMmmmMiiiAimmm 




St. Mary's Church 

% Crescent St., Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7. 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapp&d Accessible 

New Members Welcomel 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman CathoUc Community walking together 

in Faitti, Worstup, Education and Sennce' 

386 Hwicock SL, North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped AccessH)le 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 




UNITED RRST PARISH CHURCH 
1306H»ncockStn^ 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-773-1290 

www.ufpc.org 

Surxiay Worship 10:30 am 

We are a welconw\g Congregation 




First Church of Squantum 

164BeiievueSi»617-328-S649 

Pastor Michael S. Robertson 

Co-Pastor Dr Emmy Robertson 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

MAreWetcome 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREQATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-779-6424 

Worsh^) and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



To Advertise 

in this Directory, 

Call617'471'3100 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Stre^ 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. 

Weeiiday Masses 9am 
CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

HarxOcapped aocessitfle A 
Handicapped partdng, side entrance 
air corHMboned 



44 School St., 
Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday (Vigil Mass) 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7:30 a.m.. 9 a.m. 
and 1 1 a.m. (Family Uturgy) 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
Handicapped Access^)te 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 
617-479-8778 • www.hncong.org 

Family Day Service 
at 9:30 am 

7 Deadly Sins: Pride' 
Rey. John Castricum 




Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 



Spear & Coddington Streets 

Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

10 tum. Worship Service 

and Church School 
Rev. William C. Harding 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

United Church of Christ 

48 Winthrop Ave. - 617-773-7432 

Pastor: Rev. Mary Lou Gifford 

Sunday Worship at 10 a.m. 

Rev. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Annual Meeting Day 

Estelle Margarones, fonner 

Seminarian Student, Preaching 

InterNational Treasure: The Book 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Comer of Hancock & Lindeo Sts., Quincy 

(617) 472-0737 • wwwjtciu7sostom.coni 

Rev. David Hefling 

Sunday Escharbt 10 a jn. 

SiindayScho<ri9:30ajn. 

Wednesday Eucharist 8:30 aun. 

Nursery Care during Service 

Coffee Hour Following 

ALL WELCOME 

THRIFT SHOP hours W, Th, Fr. 10-4 




UNION CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.,Wollaston 

(617)479-6661 

Sunday Worship Sen^ice 

10 AM 
Rev. John Swanson, Pastor 



EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF ATUNT1C 
65 NewtHiry Ave. North Quhcy 

(617) 847-4444 • 

interim Pastor Wayne Earl 

10:30 Sunday Worship 

Sermon: 'Kingdom Living' 

7PM Bmlllan A/G Senrlce 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

50 Huddns Ave., Squantum 
617-773-5878 • Pastor Mike Fehan 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. * Gospel of Matthew 

Children's Class 10 a.m. 

Bible Discussion Group Wed. 7:45 p.m. 

Handifc^ 4ccess«Me 

email: infoQsauantumcf.org 




ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 'Upward Road or Backsliding' 



Saint Ann's Church 

•l1747M4n 

Pastor Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 
Sunday 7KX). 9:00. 11 :3QAM 

Daily Maseee: 9K)0 AM 
HanMoaffied Chaum A\ miahia 



ALL ARE WELCOME 

Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 

Following Worship Service 

Wheelchair Accessible 



First dnvck •{ 
Ckrist, Scicmtist 



Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 



^ 



37 E. Ilm Ava., Wollaston 

(ei7)472-5ee9 

On Th* Campus Of 
EMt«m NaiarwiM Coilwg* 

Pastor Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sunday Sennces 

8:30 am - Hoiy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children's 

Sunday School 

1 1 a.m. - Blended Worship Service 

Come Worstwp with Us! 



QUINCY COMMUNmr 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr. Susan Jarek-GUdden, Pastor 



.<r 



ISiSSAM 




7tSSPM 



2t GreealMif Street Qi^My 

9tt Umaco€k St. 

€17-472-0055 



r^^l 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 617-472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



GOOD SHEPHERD 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

308 West Squantum Street 

No. Quincy, MA 02171 

617-32fr«348 

The Rev. Nithan D. Pipho 

10-JO a.m. Holy Corranunion Sunday 
6:30 pm Wednesday MgM fibte %idy, FMoMNp 



TliDnday,Janiuu724,20M TbAQuliney 



Page 25 




casisjiir^ 




KUMU GUPTA (fifth from left) of Quincy receives a Commoiiwealth Soninar diploma are 
attending a recent Commonwealtli Seminar at tlie State House. Witli lier are (from left) Rep. 
Willie M^ Allen oi Boston, Sen. Pamda Resor, Rep. Geraldine Creedon of Brockton; Lisa 
Wong, mayor <^ Fitcliburg; Jod Barerra, co-founder Commonwealtli Seminar; and Leverett 
Wing, executive director Asian American Conmiission <^ the Commonwealth. 

Kumu Gupta Graduates 
Commonwealth Seminar At State House 



Kumu Gupta of C^ncy, 
a member of the Advisory 
Board of the newly formed 
Asian American Commis- 
sion of the Commonwealth 
and vice chairperson of the 
(Juincy Human Rights Com- 
mission, recently graduated 
the 12th Commonwealth 
Seminar (MassCS) held in 
the Senate Reading Room of 
the State House. 

Mayor-elect Lisa Wong 
of Fitchburg, the first Asian 
American female mayor in 
Massachusetts history, was 
the keynote speaker at the 
ceremony. 

MassCS is a private pro- 
gram founded by former 
Senator Jarrett Barrios and 
Joel Barrera intended to open 
the doors of the State House 
to diverse leaders. The pro- 
gram has now trained more 



than 400 diverse leaders - 
recruited from communities 
of color, inmiigrant groups, 
and others woricing directly 
to benefit those communities 
- to become more effective 
advocates on state-level is- 
sues. 

Participants go through 
an intensive program that 
explains the legislative and 
budget process and intro- 
duces leaders to legislators 
and administration officials. 

Past graduates of the pro- 
gram include: EOHHS 
Communication Director 
Juan Martinez; David 
Halbert in the Governor's 
office; Heather Ross, who 
serves as research director 
for Leader Byron Rushing 
and many other diverse lead- 
ers who are contributing to 
the public life of Massachu- 



setts. 

Immediately following 
the graduation ceremony in 
the Senate Reading 
Room, there was a reception 
in Nurses' Hall in honor of 
the graduates. 



Patrick Flaherty District Sales 
Manager For Viega, LLC 



Viega, LLC announces 
Patrick (Pat) Flaherty has 
joined the \^chita, Kansas- 
based plumbing and radiant 
heating supplier as district 
sales manager for eastern 
Massachusetts. 

Raherty has more than 25 
years' experience in the 
plumbing and radiant heat- 
ing industry. He owned his 
own plumbing company in 
Milton, for 18 years and 
spent three-years with Texas 

Free Senior 
Medical IVips 

Medical transportation 
with curb to curb service 
Mondays through Fridays is 
provided at no cost to Quincy 
seniors. 

The service requires two 
weeks notice for trips, in- 
cluding those to Braintree 
Hospital, Carney Hospital, 
Milton Hospital and eight 
major hospitals in Boston. 

To request a trip, call the 
Transportation Office at 6 1 7- 
376-1242 




PATRICK FLAHERTY 

Instruments. 

Prior to joining Viega, 
Flaherty was a sales repre- 
sentative for Burnham 
Hydronics for four years. 

He lives in Quincy with 
his wife and three children. 

COA In Need 
Of Bath Seats 

The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need for bath seats 
for senior citizens. 

If you have one to donate, 
call the COA at 617-376- 
1245. 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

ThelMal Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 08P6tm^P 
in the Estate of 

ROSE S. RABINOWITZ 

Late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

Date of Death 

November 1 , 2007 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to t>e the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
NINA R. SCHNEIDER also 
known as NINA M. 
SCHNEIDER of SHARON in 
the County of NORFOLK or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed executor, 
named in the will to serve 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
FEBRUARY 20. 2008 . 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, January 
11,2008. 

mrmcKW. mcdermott 

Ragistw of Probata 
1/24/08 



Commonwsalth of 

Massachusetts 

The IVIal Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P2851GM 

In the Matter 

Of JOEY YU 

Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF GUARDIAN OF MINOR 

To all persons interested in 
the above captioned matter, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that JAMIE 
YU of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK and WEI YUN 
LI of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
guardian of the person and 
the estate of JOEY YU of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK, a minor child, to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
JANUARY 31 .2008. 

WITNESS. HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE. 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, November 
28, 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probata 
1/24/08 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The THal Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 08P0045EP 

In the Estate of 
MARIE L. JOHNSON 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
December 10, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
MARIE RILEY of 

WEYMOUTH in the County 
of NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
executor, named In the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 
FEBRUARY 20. 2008 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, January 8, 
2008. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/24/08 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The THal Court 

ProlMrte and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 07P311 SAD 

In the Estate of 
BERTHA FARRELL 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
April 22, 1990 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF ADMINISTRATOR 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that F. KEVIN 
FARRELL of WOLLASTON 
in the County of NORFOLK 
or some other suitable per- 
son be appointed administra- 
tor of said estate to serve with 
personal surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

FEBRUARY 13. 2008. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN, ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, December 
31,2007. 

PATRK:K W. McDERMOTT 
Reglator of Probate 
1/24/08 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Department 
NORFOLK Division 

Docket No. 08P0010EP 
In the Estate of 
GIOVANNA L. BALDUCCI 
A/K/A GIOVANNA L 
"GIANNA" BALDUCCI 
Late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death 
June 15, 2007 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, 
a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that a docu- 
ment purporting to be the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
SANDRA I CARTER of 
MARLBOROUGH in the 
County of MIDDLESEX or 
some other suitable person 
be appointed executor, 
named in the will to serve 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
CANTON ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00AM) ON 

FE BRU A RY 2 0, 2009. 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating specific 
facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, HON. DAVID 
H. KOPELMAN. ESQUIRE, 
First Justice of said Court at 
CANTON this day, January 7, 
2008. 

PATRTCK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
1/24/08 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 07E0118-PP1 

To My Thi Tran of Quincy 
in said County, Washington 
Mutual Bank of Stockton in 
the State of California, re- 
spondents; and to all other 
persons Interested. 

A petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court by 
James H. Warren of Quincy 
in the County, of Norfolk rep- 
resenting that he holds as 
tenant in common an undi- 
vided part or share of certain 
land lying in Quincy in said 
County of Norfolk and briefly 
described as follows: 

That certain parcel with 
buildings thereon situated in 
Quincy, being shown as Lot 
484 on Bowdoin Street, as 
shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Wollaston Land 
North Addition, Quincy, 
Mass." dated April 1924, 
Whitman and Howard Civil 
Engineers, recorded with 
Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1626, Page 
601, and bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY by 
Bowdoin Street, Fifty (50) 
feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by 
Lots 483 and 482 as shown 
on said Plan, One Hundred 
Fifteen (115) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by 
portion of Lots 481 and 467 
as shown on said Plan, Fifty 
(50) feet; and 

NORTHWESTERLY by 
Lots 466 and 465 as shown 
on said Plan, One Hundred 
Fifteen (115) feet. 

Containing 5,750 square 
feet, according to said Plan. 

Setting forth that he desire 
that - all - of said land may 
be sold at private sale for not 
less than four hundred thou- 
sand ($400,000) dollars and 
praying that partition may be 
made of all the land aforesaid 
according to law, and to that 
end that a commissioner be 
appointed to make such par- 
tition and be ordered to make 
sale and conveyance of all, 
or any part of said land which 
the Court finds cannot be 
advantageously divided, ei- 
ther at private sale or public 
auction, and be ordered to 
distribute the net proceeds 
thereof. 

If you desire to object 
thereto, you or your attorney 
should file a written appear- 
ance in said Court at Norfolk 
Probate Court, 35 Shawmut 
Road, Canton, MA before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fourth day of February 2008, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, DAVID H. 
KOPELMAN, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
twenty-sixth day of Decem- 
ber 2007. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register 
1/17, 1/24, 1/31/08 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
ixjilding a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

617-471-3100 



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Jik-l>^lttMfc^lt!llU^^...^ 



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FOR SALE 



FOR 
SALE 

10" Craftsman table saw 

12" Bench band saw $125.00 

New Router & Router Table 

with 1 2 router bits all three 

still in box, never used 

New 35 -piece 

router bits $175.00 

617-479-4631 



SERVICES 



FALL ^ 

CLEAN-UPS 

Callfor 

Free 
Estimate 

617-733-4554 



Tl 



MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS 



ADVERTISING 

Are you a business 
owner? Do you think 
your business is too 
small or too big to ad- 
vertise? The New 
England Press Asso- 
ciation can help build 
your clientele all 
across New En- 
gland! To advertise at 
a lower rate and 
higher volume con- 
tact Latifa Sanchez 
at 617 373 5611 or 
L.sanchez @ nepa.org 
Visit our website: 
www.nepa.org ONE 
CALL DOES IT ALL! 

AUTOMOBILES 

DONATE YOUR VE- 
HICLE Receive 
FREE vacation 
voucher Donate your 
vehicle receive free 
vacation voucher 
United Breast Can- 
cer Foundation Free 
Mammograms, 
Breast Cancer Info 
www. ut>cf. info FREE 
Towing, Tax Deduct- 
ible, Non-Runners 
Accepted, 1-888- 
468-5964 

$1,000 SHOPPING 
SPREE. Donate Car. 
Max IRS Deduction, 
Any condition. Help 
Foster Kids, Free 
Quick PIck-Up, No 
Papers OK, 

ESPANOL, 24/7, 1- 
888-204-7534 

$500! POLICE IM- 
POUNDS! 1996 
Mitsubishi Galant 
Only $700! 1994 
Audi 90CS Only 
$750! Hondas, 
Fords, Jeeps, etc. 
from $5001 Cars/ 
Trucks/SUV's! For 
Listings Call 800- 
559-4138 XL159. 



BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY 

ALL CASH CANDY 
ROUTE. Do 5ju earn 
$800 in a day? Your 
own local candy route. 
Includes 30 Machines 
and Candy. All 4r 
$9,995. 1-800-921- 
3949 

EDUCATION 

ATTEND COLLEGE 
ONLINE from home. 
Medical , business, 
paralegal, computers, 
criminal justice. Job 
placement assistance. 
Financial aid and com- 
puter provided if quall- 
fied. Call 866-858- 
2 12 1, 

EMPLOYMENT 
SERVICES 

Get Crane Trained! 
Crane/Heavy Equip. 
Training. National Cer- 
tification Prep. Place- 
ment Assistance. Fi- 
nancial Assistance. 
Georgia School of 
Construction. 
www.Heavy5.com Use 
code: "N2CNH" 1-866- 
563-5629 

NOW AVAILABLE! 
2007 Post Office Jobs. 
$1 8-$20/hr. No Experi- 
ence, paid training. 
Fed benefits, vacation. 
Call Now! 1-800-910- 
9941 (Reference # 
NG08) 

HELP WANTED 

Drivers: CALL TODAY! 
Bonus & Pakj Orienta- 
tion 36-43cpm Earn 
over $1000 weekly Ex- 
cellent Benefits Class 
A and 3 mos recent 
OTR required 800- 
635-8669 

Regional Dry Van. 



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\ vlHV''* 


ItJKKJiltalBmKm 


L- 3L-^JV 3 







SERVICES 



WANTED 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



Gigi Cleaning Service 

Professional and caring . 

To have your house clean will cost 

you much less than you think. 

FortlfHoHdayal 

To have your free estimates call 

617-501-8512 

gigihousecleaner&hotmail.com 



We have good references!!! y^ 1 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

617-471-3100 



MISCELLANEOUS 



') •• »» 



- 



mm p^ ■«« ms < 



NEW PAY PACKAGE, 
Weekly HomeTime, 
Late Model Equipment 
CDL-A & 6 mo. Exp. 
req. 800-828-9640 
X 2 2 8 

www.piioritytmcking.com 

WANT HOME MOST 
WEEKENDS WITH 
MORE PAY? 

Heartland's GREEN 
MILE$ program! $.54/ 
mile company drivers 
and $1.33 for opera- 
tors! 12 months OTR 
required. HEART- 
LAND EXPRESS 1- 
800-441 -4953 
wwwhearHandeDqDiessoom 

TRAVEL THE USA 
FOR PAY! Use your 
pick up truck to deliver 
"new" RV's nationwide. 
Motorhomes too! Get 
paid to see the coun- 
t r y . 

www.horiaontransportcom 

ELECTRICAL TECH- 
NICIANS - Entry level 
positions available. 
Fully paid training. 
Must be High School 
graduate, college help- 
ful. Be willing to relo- 
cate out of area. Call 1 - 
800-792-9099 

A Surrogate Mother 
Wanted: Established 
Surrogacy Program 
seeks loving women, 
21 -45m to carry 
couples biological ba- 
bies, prior birth expe- 
rience required, non- 
smokers, generous 
compensation. 1-888- 
3 6 3-9457 

AVON! Career or 
pocket nfK>ney, you de- 
cide! Up to 50% com- 
mission profit. Low 
start up. Email ISR 
L I s a e 
LwilberOaol.com on 
can tol free 1-800-258- 
1815 

9^ mm mm •«. m4 



Quincy, MA 

617.792.9884 

Call Now & Save 
20% on your next job 

MX)FING • SIDING • IMNDOWS • ANTING • CARPENM 

All Your Home Improvement Needs! 

*& SNOW REMOVAL 




Lksnsid * Imwsjh> 



1/31 



HOMES FOR RENT 

"HUD HOMES* 4bd' 
2ba $277/mo! 5bd 3ba 
$306/mo! More 1-4 
Bedrooms From $1 99/ 
mo! 5% dn, 20 yrs @ 
8%! For Listings Call 
800-559-4145 xTI 70 

HOUSES FOR SALE 

5bd 3ba FORECLO- 
SURE! Only $290/mo! 
More 1-4 bedrooms 
Available! 4% down, 
20 years @ 8%! For 
Listings Call, 800-559- 
4145XS950 

LOTS AND 
ACREAGES 

10 acres - Views - 

was 59,900, NOW 

$39,900 

40 acres - Barns - 

was 149.900, NOW 

$99,900 

34 acres - Lake - was 

225,000, NOW 

$179,900 

Upstate NY, 3 hrs 

NYC! Survey, clear 

title, g'teed 

buildable, owner 

terms! Hurry! 877-892- 

5263 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MISCELLANEOUS 

SAWMILLS from only 
$2,990,300 - Convert 
your LOGS TO VALU- 
ABLE LUMBER with 
your own portable 
band sawmill. Log 
skidders also available 
ww^Amofwoodsai/^mkjoom^ 
500A FREE informa- 
tion: 1-800-578-1363 
Ext. 500-A 



.99 CENT Coffee SPE- 
CIAL! Sample our 
Ugandan & Guatema- 
lan coffee for only .99 
cents! Love the taste of 
coffee, but hate having 
upset stomachs, try 
our low acid coffee. 
Equatorial Coffee car- 
ries fair trade and or- 
ganic coffee. Visit 
www.ec|uatonalcoflee.oom 
to view the complete 
list of International Cof- 
fee we carry. Call for 
more Information 1- 
888-542-2236 

MORTGAGES 

REVERSE MORT- 



GAGES! SENIOR 
HOMEOWNERS! No 
payment until you per- 
manently leave your 
Residence. Govern- 
ment insured, no quali- 
fying. Call Frank Costa 
1-800-974-4846x229. 
Continental Funding, 
Stoughton MA. 

W w w . c f c - 
reversemortgage.com 

REAL ESTATE 

ADIRONDACK 
BASS LAKE 19 Acres. 
- $59,900 Beautiful 
woodlands, nice views, 
great hunting / fishing 
Christmas & Associ- 
ates 800-229-7843 
www.landarxJcamps.com 

VACATION RENTALS 
FLORIDA. MARCO IS- 
LAND, Beachfronts 
Available Now. Vaca- 
tion Rentals/Sales 
Beachfront condos, 
private homes. Enjoy 
shopping & beaches 
Century 21 1st South- 
ern Trust 800-618- 
8 5 2 

WWW.C21 marco.com 



■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



3 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION 
FORM and MAIL TO 



Cftu± 



^^w^^ 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ]1YEARIN QUINCY $25.00 

[ ]1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



Tlmnday, Janiuuy 24, 2008 TIm Quiaoy 8ub Page27 



\. 




FOR RENT 



HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE F. BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 
Rentals for all Occasions 
617-472-6234 
617-479-2254 ^ 



SERVICES 



PAINTING BY PROFESSIONAL 

Interior & Exterior 

Power Washing & Carpentry 

All Types of House Repairs 

Reasonable Price 

Small Jobs Welcome 

Leave Message 617-773-4761 ^^ 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

CaU now to book your Party 

and other Special Events 

617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOI.com tf 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

CaU for Details 

617-770-4876 

Small Weddings • Showers 

Christenings • Meetings 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 

HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 ^ 

TF 



IMAGE 
IMPROVEMENT 

LANDSCAPINQ 
SIMCE 1972 

We Clean It... Trim 
It... Remove It 

No Job Too Big 
or Too Small 
^^^ Free Estimates 
^^W Fully Insured 

617-471-0044. 



FUNCTION FACILITY 
QUINCY YACHT CLUB 

1310 Sea St., Quincy 

Beautiful Bay Views 

Full Bar & Kitchen 

Handicap Equip 

617-471-6136 



1/24 



III 

Plowing Residential 
and Light Commercial 
Shoveling at extra cost 
Call 617-471-0000 ., 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 
Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 
617-251-6242 . 



LOCAL PAINTER 

Average Room - walls 2 coats $150 

Ceilings 2 coats $75 - paints 

included. Also windows, doors, etc. 

Inside or out. Prompt, clean service. 

Kevin 781-331-5392 

CeU 508-221-1447 ^^ 



DeFrancesco Construction 

Specializing In: REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

ROOFING - TRIM - GUTTERS - VINYL SIDING 

CaU Today for a quick, FREE Estimate 

or No Hassle Information 

617-365-1444 

30 Year Guarantee on All Workmanship 

Fully Licensed & Insured MA Reg. #101376 tf 




Sump Pumps 

Sales • Services 
Installations 



617-224-3725 
Fax:617-770-3462 ,> 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating, Gas Fitting 
Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 
Emergencies 617-792-4054 

Master Lie # 13749 tf 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves, 

machinist, and sheetmetal tools, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections: old postcards, toys, 

military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Davistownmuseum.org 

e-Store & antique sale! tf 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FAMILY BIBLE 

Seeking whereabouts of Welsh 

bible for THOMAS family - possibly 

given to Masonic/Rural Lodge in 

Quincy/Wollaston in the 1930s. 

Info - please call 

412-841-7531 (Pittsburgh, PA) 

1/31 



THOMAS C. SWEENEY 

Smaller Jobs a Specialty 

44 Years Experience 

Carpentry, Siding, Painting, Porclies 

VinylAVindows, Door$, 

Roofing, Deciding, Steps 

License #1373 Free Estimates 

Reliable 617-825-1210 References 

■in 



HOME SWEET HOME 
REAL ESTATE 

Fran Lawlor • Quincy, MA 

617-328-9952 

Cell 617-314-3788 



SAVE 

Budget Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 

TF 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLUMBING, HEATING & AC 

Specializing in Viessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 
MA Lie. #10589 y\S 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



LAWFORD PLUMBING 

ft HOME REPAIRS 

Small Jobs • Faucet Repairs 

• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals Installed 

• Minor Carpentry 

• Tile & Grout Repairs 
• Baseboard & Radiator 

Steam Cleaning 

24 Hour Service 
Master Uc. ^7306 

781-817-5434 t. 



SERVICES 




Hancock 
TV. & Appliance 

Sates, Service, 
Parts & installation 

Since 1945 

(617)472-1710 

115 Franklin Street, 
Quincy, MA 

hancocktvandappliance com 



*YARD WORK CO.* 

• Lawn Mowing Service 

• Every 2 weeks or 3 times a month 

• Rental Properties welcome 

• SPRING CLEANUPS 

• Mulch Work 

• Expert Hedge and Bush Trimming 

• Serving Quincy for 20 Years 

Call Bill Fielding 
617-471-6124 



ACiPAIHnRpun 
M€K OF AU TRADES 

Senior Citizen Discounts j 
Call Jack 617-773-4761 



MISCELLANEOUS 



QUINCY SUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance 
to earn extra money 
by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

617-471-3100 




McDonagh Roofing 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 

RUBBER ROOFING 

GUTTERS CLEANED & INSTALLED 

CHIMNEY FLASHING & POINTING 

VINYL SIDING 

VINAL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 

617-471-6960 

Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates 

Mass. Reg. # 147733 



3/6 



BOB'S HOME REPAIR 

* Decks and Porches Built OR Repaired 

* Front OR Back Steps Repaired OR Replaced 

* Replacement Windows Installed 

* Garages Repaired 

* Vinyl Siding Installed OR Repaired 

* Wood Shingles Repaired 

* Kitchen Cabinets Installed 

* Expert Carpenter ! ! 

INSURED. MASS. UC. #CS086129 

CALL BOB BLAKE - 617-471-6124 



MARBLE • CERAMIC 
• GRANITE • 

TILE GUY 

Specializing in Customer 
Satisfaction. Perfection Guaranteed 

Call Pauly 
1-774-273-0406 .:, 



A GUTTS ClEUiM CO. 

Professional Replacement, 
Cleaning & Repair 

Powerwash 
Graffiti Removal 

(781)844-2287 



4/10 



PERSONALS 



PRAYER 

To the Application 
To the Holy Spirit. 

Holy Spirit, you who solve all prob- 
lems, who light all roads so that I may 
attain my goal, you who give me the 
divine gift to forgive and forget all evil 
against me and that in all instances of 
my life you are with me, I want in this 
short prayer to thank you for all things 
and to confirm once again, that I never 
want to be separated from you even 
in spite of all material illusion, I wish 
to be with you in eternal glory. Thank 
You for your mercy toward me and 
mine. Repeat this prayer for 3 con- 
secutive days. After 3 days the favor 
requested will be granted, even If it 
may appear diffrcult. This prayer must 
be published immediately after favor 
is granted without mentioning the fei- 
vor. Only your initials should appear 
at the brttom. TRS. 1/24/08 



HAPPY 70TH 

BIRTHDAY JOAN! 

May all your wishes 

come true. 

Love, 
Maureen & George 

.V •*% ••« ••* ,'4' t-t »-• .-l-z*.' 



PERSONALS 



ST. JUDE NOVENA 

May the Sacred heart of Jesus 
be adored, glorified, loved and 
praised throughout the world 
now and forever. Sacred heart 
of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude 
worker of miracles pray for us. 
St. Anthony, protector and won- 
der worker pray for us. Say this 
prayer nine times a day by the 
eighth day your prayer will be 
answered. It has never been 
known to fail. Publication must 
be promised. PC.B i/24 



THANK YOU 
ST. JUDE 

for prayers answered. 
N.T.G. 



1-24 



Save Gas and 

Money 
Shop Locally 



•<••»« 



i • • • • 



a « I 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 

□ Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
G Antiques 

□ Hea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
Q Instruction 

□ Daycare 

□ Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



RATES 
IWEEK 



□ 



$8.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 
100 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $7.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ $6.75 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE 



□ Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



□ $6.50 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 1 3 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

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NO REFl ND WILL BE MADE AT THLS CONTRAtT RATE IN THE EVENT OE C ANC ELLATION. 
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Page 28 



Hmnday, January 24, 



Abigail's Crossing Gift Shop 
Plans Closing By March 31 



Davis Calls Meeting On Lowe's 



(Com d From Page 9) 

the Church of the Presidents. 

"I was home with my kids 
for 25 years," said Dondero 
of the years before her gift 
shop. Three of her four 
children. Caroline Goff. 
Mark and Jennifer, still live 
in Quincy while daughter 
Jonna Sheehy lives in South 
Boston 

Inside Abigail's Crossing, 
candle and potpourri 
fragrances fill the air and 
shoppers find a wealth of 
unique furniture, figurines, 
plush animals, clocks, toys, 
frames, and mementos of 
histonc Qumcy as well as 
frames, photos, sketches and 
mirrors which can be ordered 
depictmg specific schools 
and colleges. 

"I'll still have my 
website." Dondero said, 
adiling that clients will be 
able to order familiar items 
online at 

w WW .abii:;uls«.n>\singgifts.ci)in. 

While she has no 
miscn ini;s.ibt)iit mo\ ingon, 
l)oiulcn> is sail as she Ivuins 



closing this chapter with 
friends and customers, and, 
especially her staff. 

"It breaks my heart 
because my heart belongs to 
Quincy." Dondero who, 
along with her husband, is a 
lifelong resident. 

.She said she'll miss 
everybody and the shop and 
the work. 

"My heart will break for 
the customers who will miss 
us. " said Dondero. "It's not 
just about me." 

"I loved doing my 
windows and knowing 
people enjoyed them," she 
said, but also added that 
owning a business is a serious 
undertaking that takes up 
time. 

"It's something you don't 
leave your job when you go 
home." said Dondero. She 
enjoyed the gift shows, the 
skim nil ng of magazines for 
ideas and the people, but 
business owners are working 
or thinking of their shopeven 
when It's closed. 

In her farewell letter to 



friends and clients, Dondero 
said she wanted to spend 
more time with her husband, 
her children and 
grandchildren, her mother. 
Virginia Kasper of Houghs 
Neck who is 88 and her 
husband's mother. Madeline 
Dondero of Marina Bay, 92. 

She also speaks of playing 
with her three grandchildren. 
Madison, Courtney and 
Nathan, who are .still young 
and her desire to spend more 
time cooking, gardening, and 
"even doing housework." 

"That'spretty sad. That'll 
get old quick." she laughed, 
referring to her housework 
reference. 

In her office at Abigail's 
Crossing. Dondero pointed 
to a painting on her wall that 
had two prize ribbons 
attached., "I want to get back 
tooil painting. I haven'tbeen 
able to paint for years." 

"I'm not going to sit 
around and let the moss 
grow." said Dondero, adding 
that she will stay on the board 
of Discover Quincy. 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

North Weymouth, now," 
said Davis who also cited the 
potential aesthetic gains for 
South Quincy. The proposed 
building would help in 
"cleaning up an entrance to 
our city that has been an 
eyesore." 

Davis referred to the 
parking of large vehicles at 
the site. 

In a Jan. 17 letter to 
constituents, Davis described 
the process involved in 
approvals for the 
development, and steps that 
have already been taken. He 
invited residents to call him 
at his office or cell phone. 

A Notice of Intent was 
filed on Sept. 28 with the 
Conservation Commission, 
which held public hearings 
in November and December. 
After two public hearings and 



a review by state agencies, 
the commission issued an 
Order of Conditions, which 
allows the project to go 
forward provided various 
orcters are met. 

The next official meeting 
will be held Feb. 4 with the 
Park and Recreation Board. 
Following the meeting, 
commissioners will advise 
the City Council regarding 
changes to Gras.so Park. The 
reconfiguration, also, 
requires approval of the 
Planning Board, and the state 
legislature. 

According to Davis, the 
Planning Board has 
tentatively scheduled a 
meeting, Wednesday, March 
12 when members will 
review the request for a 
special permit. Planners must 
also consider 

recommendations for the 
abandonment and relocation 



of Grasso Park and the 
abandonment of a portion of 
Penn St. 

Subsequently, the City 
Council will begin a review 
and, like the Planning Board, 
will hold public hearings. 

"The City Council plays 
the largest role in the 
permitting of this proposal, " 
Davis wrote, noting that the 
council must review 
recommendations of all city 
departments. 

The Zoning Board will 
also, review the Lowe's 
application because a portion 
of the site is in a flood plain 
district. 

According to Davis' 
letter, state agencies have 
already begun a review of 
the conservation issues 
involved in the plans, but state 
agencies must also consider 
the impact of the plan on 
state land and traffic. 



Quincy 2000 Schedules Business Meetings 



Broad Meadows Teachers' Night At McDonald's 



Next \h>nday. Jan 2S, 
teachers \xo\w the Bro.ui 
Mcadous Mukllc SchoiW 
vmII Ix> uorkiiie behind the 



counter at McDonald's. 47.^ 
Southern Artery trt>ni 5-7 
p.m. 

A percentage of the sales 



benefit Broad Meadows 
Middle School. 

Come order a burger and 
fries and see vour favorite 



in this time frame will go to teacher hard at work. 



Foot Screening For Seniors 

Podiatrist Dr .lordana ing office. 8.^ Saratoga St. the visit. 
S/piro will be a\aihihle ti> The diKtor will also treat For more information or 

senu»rs \oi foot s». avnmg i>n \ our feet for a fee of $25 per to make an appointment, call 

the first Monday of e\er\ personpayableat the timeof the COA at 617-376-1506. 
month at the Council on Ag- 



Quincy 2000 Collabora- 
tive, Quincy 's public/private 
economic development oi;ga- 
nization, is holding business 
partnership meetings for all 
busines.ses in several areas 
throughout the city. 

Purpose of the 
Partnership's is to provide 
business and property own- 
ers the opportunity to de- 
velop programs and re- 
sources that will strengthen 
the economic viability and 
vitality of their businesses 
and the overall business area. 

Parmership meetings will 
be held on the following 
dates: 

North Quincy & 



Squantum/Marina Bay - 
Joint Meeting, Thurs. Feb. 
7, from 8-9 a.m. at the North 
Quincy Public Library, 381 
Hancock St. 

Quincy Center, Tues., 
Jan. 29, from 8-9 a.m. at the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary. 40 Washington St. 

Peninsula Area 

(Merrymount, Adams 
Shore, Germantown, 
Houghs Neck), Tues., Feb. 
5, from 5-6 p.m. at Dailey 
Tax and Insurance, 526 Sea 
St. Call 984-5717 ext. 2 for 
more information and to 
RSVP attendance. 

Quincy 2000 Collabora- 
tive encourages all business 



owners, employees and in- 
terested individuals to attend 
the meetings to learn how 
easy it is to partner in the 
growth and prosperity of 
their business district. 

The annual meeting of 
Quincy 2000 Collaborative 
will be held Wed., Jan. 23 
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the 
Best Western Adams Inn, 29 
Hancock St., North Quincy. 
Keynote speakers will be 
Mayor Thomas R. Koch and 
incoming Chairman of the 
Board Edward Keohane, 
President of Keohane Fu- 
neral Homes, Inc. 

For further information 
contact Quincy 2000 Col- 
laborative at 617-847-1454. 



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Kerry Promises To Work 

With Koch On City Projects 

- Page 3 - 




The Q'uizi.cy 



Historic Quince's Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL. 40 No. 20 



Thursday, January 31, 2008 



Brrrrrrrmrrrrrr! 










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HASTY EXIT. Christina Lee of Braintree can iiardly wait to leave the frigid waters of Mound 
Street Beach behind her after talcing a dip in the second annual John Hancock Plunge to raise 
funds for Interfaith Social Services. Story, other photos on Page 19. 

Quincy Sun photos/Robert Noble 



50 Attend Council Hearing 



New Valuations, 

Tax Bills Raise 

Residents' Concerns 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Not only are homeowners 
struggling with higher taxes 
due to the new valuations, 
but senior residents in 
affordable housing units are 
also feehng the pinch and, 
are at risk, according to 
Councillors Daniel 

Raymondi and Joseph Finn. 

Raymondi, Ward 2 
councillor, challenged the 
new valuations for 1000 
Southern Artery where he 
said the three buildings 
increased by $8.2 million or 
20 percent in value over the 
past three years. 

As a result, Raymondi said 
70% of the residents, mostly 
senior citizens, are paying the 
additional taxes which 
increased in excess of 
$1 10,000. Some can't afford 
the hike and will leave 
Quincy. 



Abatement Request 
Deadline Is Friday 



Friday is the final day 
for filing an abatement 
request with the Assessing 
Department. The 

application must be either 
in the office by Friday or 
have a United States post 
office postmark of no later 
than Feb. 1 . 

Forms are available by 
calling 617-376-1183 or 
on the website. 



www.ci.qumcy.ma.us or 
at City Hall. 

Booklets explaining the 
valuation process, 
abatement schedule and 
exemptions are also 
available for residents. 

Numerous exemptions 
and deferrals are also 
available for qualified 
apphcants. 



Raymondi said that the 
senior residents of 451 of the 
apartments "will share the 
burden of responsibihty of 
this tax." 

Later in the meeting, Finn 
addressed the same problems 
of non-profit providers for 



such buildings as Fenno 
House; "Their actual revenue 
streams do not keep up with 
the needs." 

With taxes up, some 
"residents can not afford the 
rents in Fenno House," said 
(Cont'd On Page 12) 



42% Turnout Seen 

For Feb. 5 Super Tuesday 

Clinton-Obama 
McCain-Romney 
Take Center Stage 



Democrats Hillary 
Clinton and Barack Obama 
and Republicans Mitt Rom- 
ney and John McCain will 
take center stage here in next 
week's 22-state Super Tues- 
day presidential primaries. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
sees those battles as keys to 
an anticipated 42 per cent of 
Quincy's 54,627 registered 
voters casting ballots. 

That would not be a 
blockbuster turnout but it's 
the largest in a decade for a 
presidential primary. 

It is more than double that 
of 2004 and 10 per cent 
higher that in 2000. 

Shea points to the heated 
rivalry between Clinton, the 
New York senator, who 
hopes to be the first woman 
president, and Obama. the 
Illinois senator, hoping to be 
the first black in the White 
(Cont'd On Page 17) 




HILLARY CLINTON 



BARACK OBAMA 




JOHN McCABS 



MITT ROMNEY 



Task Force Named 
To Overhaul Zoning Laws 



Mayor Tom Koch named 
a citizens' task force Tuesday 
to undertake what he called 
the most sweeping overhaul 
of Quincy's zoning and 
building rules in recent his- 
tory. 

Then he opened the door 
for to let residents in with 
their ideas and suggestions 
for regulations designed to 
protect the integrity of the 
city's neighborhoods, now 
and in the future. 

"Everything is on the 
table," he said. 

"Targeting large scale 



developments in single-fam- 
ily neighborhoods is cer- 
tainly part of this but we are 
going to look much deeper. 

'The goal is to preserve 
our neighborhoods now and 
shape the neighborhoods we 
want 20 years from now." 

The task force includes 
architects, planners, zoning 
law experts and neighbor- 
hood residents who Koch 
said he expects to have a 
package of proposed 
changes ready in several 
months. 

The task force will review 



the city's voluminous zoning 
code with an eye toward the 
size and scope of residential 
developments, setback rules 
and aesthetic and design 
guidelines to make sure the 
projects fit the character of 
the neighborhoods. 

The mayor said several 
public heanngs on potential 
zoning changes will be held 
over the next months and he 
encouraged residents to at- 
tend them and share their 
ideas. 

I Cont'd On Patie 16 1 




Jmt Conyention To FiU School Seat - Page 2 ■ Rebecca Goreham Joins 1,000 Club - Page 25 




KLKCTION WORKERS check a voting machine in the city clerkN ofHce in preparation for 
'Hiesday's primary election. I.efl to ri{(ht: Vincent Au, City Clerk Joseph Shea, Richard Churchill 
and Nicole Crlspo. {Jumcy Sun Photo/Noreen Pepjdonovic 



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Cahill Recommends Way 
To Fund Fore River Bridge 



State Treasurer Tim 
Cahill has proposed the use 
of tax-exempt municipal 
bonds known as Grant An- 
ticipation Notes (GANs) to 
fmance construction of 10 
structurally unsound bridges 
in Massachusetts, including 
the Fore River Bridge. 

"We can't afford a public 
safety tragedy; we need a 
permanent solution for the 
Fore River and other 
bridges," he told a news con- 
ference Tuesday. 'This plan 
offers a fiscally responsible 
way to fund these urgent 
projects." 

Use of the GANs would 
not only allow the state to fix 
the bridges now. thus pre- 
venting a potential public 




TIM CAHILL 

safety disaster, but also per- 
mit the state to lock in 
project costs and repay the 
bonds with future federal 
highway funds. 

The last Fore River 
Bridge, which takes Route 



3A from Quincy to 
Weymouth, was built in the 
1930s, torn down in 2004 
and replaced with a tempo- 
rary bridge, known colloqui- 
ally as "the erector set." It's 
figured to last only another 
five years. 

A permanent replace- 
ment, 60 feet wide with four 
1 2-foot travel lanes and two 
eight-foot sidewalks, is esti- 
mated will cost about $160 
million. It is scheduled to go 
out to bid in 2010. 

The 10 bridges nominated 
by Cahill for GANs fund- 
ing were identified by the 
Massachusetts Transporta- 
tion Finance Commission as 
in dire need of repair with no 
funding mechanism identi- 
fied. 



Joint Convention To Fill Open 
School Board Seat Feb. 11 



A joint convention of city 
councillors and School Com- 
mittee members will con- 
vene Monday, Feb. 1 1 . at 5 
p.m. in the council chamber 
at City Hall to choose a suc- 
cessor to James Timmins on 
the school board. 

Timmins, who has two 
years to go in his first four- 
year term on the committee, 
resigned his seat Jan. 23 to 
become city solicitor in the 
administration of Mayor 
Tom Koch. 

"We have a lot of excit- 
ing and challenging issues 
facing the School Commit- 
tee and I look forward to 
welcoming a new member," 
said Koch, who is chairman 
of the committee by virtue of 
his office as mayor. 

"I expect the convention 
to be an orderly and respect- 
ful process and I will do ev- 
erything possible to make 
sure that happens." 



Thus far, two candidates 
have expressed an interest in 
replacing Timmins for the 
two years remaining in his 
term. 

• Nicholas Puleo, 24, a 
senior budget analyst for the 
State Senate Ways and 
Means Committee, who fin- 
ished a distant fourth in the 
five-candidate race for 
School Committee with 
7,2% votes last November. 

• Karl Roos, 40, a phar- 
maceutical salesman and 



treasurer of the Wollaston 
School PTO, who has three 
children in the school and 
whose wife is a guidance 
counselor at Braintree High 
School. 

• Eileen Mullen, 50, an 
education advocate and tutor 
who twice ran unsuccess- 
fully for a seat on the com- 
mittee and who finished last 
in November with 7,136 
votes, has not indicated an 
interest in replacing 
Hmmins. 



TVaffic At NQHS 
To Be Discussed 



The traffic situation 
around North Quincy High 
School will be discussed at 
a meeting of the Parents Ad- 
visory Committee Thursday, 
Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. in the Tro- 
phy Room at the school. 



Principal Earl Metzler 
and Assistant Principal Pam 
Mateu will present their 
monthly reports. Ann inter- 
ested parties are invited to 
attend. 




I MuM^«gMiidtSl>4i» i- 



Senator Meets With Mayor 

Kerry Promises To Work 
With Koch On City Projects 



Senator John Kerry 
promised to press for federal 
help for transportation, 
infrastructure and education 
projects during a Monday 
morning meeting at City Hall 
with Mayor Thomas Koch. 

"He promised to work 
with us," Koch said after 
meeting privately with Kerry. 
"We presented some of our 
issues." 

Kerry said the half-hour 
discussion covered such 
items as the economic 
stimulus package, the 
commuter boat, a 
transportation bond, and the 
Fore River site. 

The two leaders also 
discussed the upcoming 
HBO series on the Adams 
family. The production by 
Tom Hanks is expected to 
draw thousands and 
thousands of tourists to 
Quincy. 

"We did talk about the 
Park Service," said Koch, 
noting that the city and the 
Adams National Historical 
Park are preparing for the 
deluge. 

Just 24 hours before 



Kerry's visit. Republican Jim 
Ogonowski, a retired Air 
Force officer and Dracut 
farmer, announced his 
candidacy for Kerry ' s senate 
seat. He will oppose Kerry in 
November. 

On Oct. 16, Ogonowski 
lost a special election for 
Congress when he ran against 
Democrat Nikki Tsongas, 
widow of former Senator 
Paul Tsongas. 

"I'm ready for the battle," 
said Kerry, adding, "I've 
been through battles all my 
hfe. I'm very confident" 

With his experience as a 
senator, Kerry said that he's 
delivered millions of dollars 
for state projects and can 
continue to work for the Bay 
State through his powerful 
conmiittees. 

However, Kerry does 
agree with Ogonowski' s 
charge that "Washington is 
not working." 

"Washington is broken," 
said Kerry, adding "and I've 
been working to fix it." Kerry, 
also, said that is why he is 
supporting Sen. Obama 
Barack in his bid for the 



presidency, 

Kerry said he believes the 
inmiigration issue must be 
addressed, but opposes 
drivers' licenses for illegal 
inmiigrants. 

As for wind turbines, a 
current issue in Quincy and 
across the state, Kerry said, 
"We need to have some sort 
of standards and 
environmental studies. 
"It's not a silver bullet," said 
Kerry who noted that he has 
been a leader in supporting 
renewable energy with a goal 
of 20 percent reduction by 
2020. 

He cited his initiative that 
would have provided $23 
billion in incentives for 
alternative energies with the 
funds funneled from the oil 
company tax breaks. Oil 
company profits currently 
exceed $253 billion, 
according to Kerry who said 
the companies opposed the 
measure. 



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MAYOR THOMAS KOCH and Senator John Kerry met privately Monday at City HaU to 
discuss local and federal issues. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 

Ward 4 Democrats 
To Caucus Feb. 2 



Registered Democrats in 
Ward 4 will caucus Saturday, 
Feb. 2 at 10 a.m. in the Ward 
4 Community Center. 100 
Brooks Ave., South Quincy, 
to choose delegates to the 
2008 state convention. 

A total of 10 delegates. 



five males and five female, 
as well as one female and one 
male alternate will be chosen 
for the convention to be held 
Saturday, June 7, at Tsongas 
Arena in Lowell. 

Any registered Democrat 
as of Dec. 3 1 , 2007, residing 



in Ward 4, who is at least 18 
years of age is welcome to 
attend the caucus and run for 
delegate. 

For more information, 
contact Bryan Connolly at 
617-479-7543 or the Demo- 
cratic State Committee at 
617-776-2676. 



Mexican Restaurant On 
MontclairAVollaston Agenda 



The MontclairAVollaston 
Neighborhood Association 
will meet Thursday, Feb. 7, 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Church of 
the Good Shepherd at 
Harvard and West Squantum 
Streets to discuss the pro- 
posed Chipotle Mexican 
Restaurant. 

The meeting was called 



by Ward 3 City Councillor 
Kevin Coughlin to address 
concerns prior to the issu- 
ance of the restaurant 
planned for 60 Newport 
Ave., formerly Henry's Root 
Beer. 

The License Board will 
take action on the request 
Tuesday, Feb. 12. 




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LENDER 
insurwJ FO»C 



USPS 453-060 

Published wMWy on Thurwtey by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St.. Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosvvodh, Jr.. Pubflaher 
Robert H. Botworth, Editor 

SOC per copy $25 00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30 00 per year by mail outside Quincy $38 00 out of state 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Pehodicato postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Serx) address change to 

The Oumcy Sun. 1372 Hencock St.. Quincy MA 02169 

TTw OiMncy Sun MaumM no AnancWI rMponwbWiv tor typograpMoal •rroit tn 
■<lv»rl>»» m >n>»bu>«i>*rtpfio»»hrt part ot an ■<N»«ii>«m»rtm which Itwtypogfiphtoal 
•rrcwoooura 




Moments 
in time 

IHEHBTOffifCHANNIL 



• On Feb 1, 1884, the lint 
portion of the Oxford English 
Dictionary is published. 
Today, at ■ w-hopping 20 vol- 
umes weighing more than 1 37 
pounds. It would reportedly 
take one person 1 20 years to 
type all .^9 milbon words in the 
OED 

• On Jan. 31, 1923, novel- 
ist Norman Mailer is bom in 
Long Branch. NJ. In 1948 
he wrote his first novel. "The 
Naked and the De«d." based 
on his own cxptncnces in 
the Army during World War 
n The book became a popu- 
lar and critical success. 

•On Jan. 29. 1936, the U.S. 
Baseball Hall of Fame elects 
Its first members in Cooper- 
stown, NY: TV Cobb. Babe 
Ruth. Honus Wagner. Christy 
Matthewson and Walter 
Johnson. It has elected 278 
individuals in all. including 
225 players, 17 managers, 8 
umpues and 28 executives 
and pioneers. 

• On Feb. 3, 1948, the first 
Cadillac with tail fins was 
produced, signaling the 
dawn of the tail fin era. Gen- 
eral Motors increased the 
size of the Cadillac's '^1 
feathers" every year 
throughout the 1950$. In 
1959. the model's sales 



slumped dramatically, 

sounding the death knell for 
the tail fin. 

• On Jan. 30, 1969, per- 
haps the most influential 
musical group of all time, 
the Beatles, make their last 
public performance, giving 
an impromptu concert on the 
roof of their London record- 
ing studio. 

• On Feb. 2, 1980, details 
of ABSCAM. an FBI opera- 
tion to uncover political cor- 
rujHion in the government, 
are released to the public. 
Thirty-one public officials 
were targeted for investiga- 
tion. In the operation. FBI 
agents posed as representa- 
tives of Abdul Enterprises, 
Ltd.. a fictional business 
owned by an Arab sheik. 

• On Jan. 28, 1996, Jerry 
Seigel, creator of Superman, 
dies at age 8 1 . Seigel created 
Superman with Joe Shuster 
when they were both 
teenagers in the 1930s. All 
the major newspaper syndi- 
cates rejected the character. 
In 1 938, however, Seigel and 
Shuster finally landed a 
comic -book deal, and the 
Man of Steel became an 
instant hit. 

C 200S Idni Feanirei Synd . Inc. 



{/y/.-.y/yy/yyyyyyyy^yyy^/^yj'/y^zyyyy^yyyy^yy^y^yyyyyy^yy/y^zzy^yy^y/^/j'. 



K^ 



QUING ANIMAL SHELTER 

M ftoorfSlraef, Quincf • 617-37i-t349 

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IN'SHELmADOFTION HOURS 

TUESDAY and WUKDAYS 6M to 8:00 pm 

SATUmkYS 10 am ' 4 pm 

Adoplkm hes iadikk iHMal vaadmiliom 

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new volynleen always iieaML 

FOR LOST or FOUND ANIKIUS call 

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01617^76-1364. 



WS^Hl^ y.o Shih Tzu. 
1 .11 V; 1 V.O.. verv etwi^tic. 
SAMANTHA; pocxUc mix 

WE HA VE LOTS OF KITTESS 
NEEDING GOOD HOMES! 

G£RiyJK^3 y.o. aU gray, loveabk. 
GLITZY: 4 y.o. stuniung black and white. 
HORACE: 2 y.o. who loves bcUy nibs. 
J£SSI£LYouiig male. aU black. 
MARIfSlA: Fenuile tahhy 

MARGABKT; s y.o pait Siamese. 

SASSA£RASSLAffecti(xiate yotug tabby. 

Sl!LY£SI£&LSweet black and white. 6 y.o. 

TQ0TSIE(wiiigl4MUlTINlg^lLWoiikilikc 

to be adapted tofetfaer. 

WAlJlOr 1 1/2 y.o. playful & fneotny. 

Foster Parents/Homes Vrgentiy Needed 



; 



I 





I I < 



By Henry Bosworth 



Just One More Time . . . 




KENNEDY 




GORDON 



Every now and then I find myself thinking of things 
I wish I could see, do, or hear one more time. 
I've mentioned some of them from time to time and 
now some more. Such memories as: 

• President-elect John F. Kennedy, in his father 
Joseph's home in the Kennedy 
compound a few hours after his slim 
win over Richard Nixon, pouring 
drinks and chatting with the press. 

When asked what he thought had 
made the difference between victory 
and defeat, he replied: "He (Nixon) 
fooled around too long in the South." 

And confiding he was going to play some golf when 
he got to Florida. "But don't print that, they'll think I'm 
another Ike." 

• Ruth Gordon, calling from her apartment in New 
York City or her home on Martha's 
Vineyard all excited about her latest 
movie or TV appearance and 
reminding me to keep an eye on her 
birth certificate at City Hall. 

• Hum and Strum, Max Zides and 
Tom Currier, singing "Heart Of My 
Heart" at the Fox & Hounds 
Restaurant. 

• See John Gillis again in a crewcut. 

• Order the 45-cent luncheon special at the Howard 
Johnson restaurant downstairs at the Granite Trust 
building. (Now Bank of America.) 

• Take in a movie at the Lincoln, Strand, C^ncy, or 
Alhambra Theater. 

• Rev. John Banks, tending to his 
beehive in the tower of Bethany 
Congregational Church. 

• Meet Dorothy Lamour once again. 
She was the first 
celebrity I ever 
interviewed. She was 
at Veterans Stadium on a war bond 
selling tour and I was a young, green 
reporter at the Old Quincy Patriot 
Ledger. I got so flustered being next to 

her I kept asking her "How do you 
like, (Juincy?" She giggled, knew I was in trouble and 
then helped me get through it by interviewing herself. 

• At our second meeting 10 years later, pulling me 
down beside her at the Latin Quarter where she was 
appearing and kidding, "C'mon now, you're not a cub 
reporter anymore." (I did better in that interview.) 

• See Mimroe MacLean on one side of Veterans 
Stadium and Jack 
Donahue on the 
other, plotting 
strategy at a 
Quincy-North 
Quincy 
Thanksgiving 
football game. 





DELLA 
CHIESE 



McINTYRE 





BANKS 



LAMOUR 




MacLEAN 



DONAHUE 



• Seeing AmeUo Delia Chiesa and Jim Mclntyre 

4 shaking hands and 

their deep respect 
for one another 
after Delia Chiesa 
defeated him for 
mayor. 

• And watching 
Delia Chiesa, one 
of our frugal mayors, walking through 
City Hall turning off unnecessary lights. 

• Ride a street care from Quincy Point to Quincy 
Center-and for only a nickel. 

• Order a Coke with a dash of lemon at the Alhambra 
Tea Room. 

• See former Mayor and Councillor Tom Burgin 
stand up and tell his colleagues, "It's time to fish or cut 
bait." 

• Buy a suit or sport coat from Ray Josephine at 
Remick's. 

• Or a TV set from Remo and Pete DeNicola at South 
Shore Television. 

• And a big band album from Jason Feldman at 
Jason's Music and Luggage Shop. 

• Principal Henry Prairio at Point Junior High School 
stressing "Always give it (effort) that extra oimce." 

• Also at Point Junior, Miss Manchester galloping 
across the back of the classroom to inspire us to memorize 
'The Highwayman." (I can still recite most of it.) 

• See Dick Koch, Sr. and his flag waving young Koch 
Club members marching along Hancock Street on Flag 
Day. (Dick founded both the Koch Club and the Flag 
Day Parade.) 

• Front row seats at the Quincy Arena to have fim 
booing Ted Germaine and Tony Papalino close-up. 

• Baron Hugo, marching through the office with his 
drum to signal that The Sun Pledge 
Center had gone over the top in the 
Muscular Dystrophy Telethon. (We 
raised over $ 1 million for Jerry ' s Kids.) 

• Muriel Goudey, easily handling 
and keeping imder control an all-boy 
English class at C^ncy High School. 

• BiU Draicchio, doing his intricate 
dance directing traffic at Washington Street and Southern 
Artery. 

• Percy Lane, newspaperman, punster and bachelor 
with these pearls of wisdom: "You don't have to be 
crazy to be a newspaper man, but it helps. . . "Marriage 
is an institution but who wants to live in an institution!" 

• Little Johnny S wanson and Pat McDermott coming 
into the office to pay their Quincy Sun news carrier bills. 
Who would have thought John would grow up to be a 
minister and Pat a city councillor and Norfolk County 
Register of Probate. 

• Getting up at 4 a.m. for Quincy High School hockey 
practice at Boston Arena. (On second thought, let's 
forget that one.) 




HUGO 



New English Classes Seek Volunteer l\itors 



Volunteer tutors are 
needed fm a Quincy based 
non-profit service agency 
which will offer six classes 
of English fcM* Speakers of 
Other Languages (ESOL) 
beginning Monday, Feb. 4 

It is being funded by 
Comcast Foundation, Sover- 
eign Bank FooBdatkm and 
the Quincy Asin Resources, 
Inc. (QARl) 



QARI trains community 
volunteers to assist students 
enrolled in tiie classes. Til- 
tors do not i^ed to be bilin- 
gual. 

Classes will be held at 
three locations: The QARI 
office at 1S09 Hancock St. 
The Stop & Shop in North 
Quincy. and City Hall. 

Enqihasis will be to al- 
low intttviduais to ccMnpele 



successfully in the work- 
place and pursue a lugher 
standard of living. 

The classes are designed 
for flexibility and are struc- 
tured around stiulent demand 
and schedules. They will be 
held in the morning and 
evening. 

Classes will meet twice a 
week for 16 weeks with the 
exception of Intensive Be- 



ginners which will meet for 
1 2 weeks. 

Registration is on a first 
come first served basis and 
class size is limited. The fee 
for most classes will be $90. 
Registered students may pur- 
chase their books for $25 
from the QARI. 

For more information, 
contact QARI at 617-472- 
2200. 



ihm* 



■WhiffrtiyfJaiiiAiygl^ 200»'*»»r^ii^^a>#l»iAtv"ftige 5 



r 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS A 1924 postcard view of the Stoney Brae Golf 
clubhouse at the top of Forbes Hill in Wollaston. Notice 
the old cars on the left and if you look closely you can 
see the flag had only 48 stars. Forbes Hill is a glacial- 
drift drumlin just like the harbor islands and, as such, 
its composition is quite different from the nearby vol- 
canic-formed granite hills of West Quincy. But, like its 
granite neighbors, this hill also provides golfers with 
spectacular views of Boston harbor. Now known as the 



Furnace Brook Golf Club, the golf course originally 
had 18 holes and was bisected by Furnace Brook as 
well as the Parkway. Today's nine-hole course was cre- 
ated when the portion of land south of the Parkway, 
with the other nine holes, was sold and developed faito 
house lots in the early 1950s. Under an agreement when 
the Stoney Brae Oub went bankrupt, the Furnace 
Brook Club currently leases this land from the dty. To 
contact Tom Galvin, e-mail tmgalvin@verizon.net 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



1963 

4S yours Agd 



Ri:\i>i:rs Forim 



She Supports Kucinich 



I want to encourage ev- 
eryone in Quincy to vote on 
Tuesday, Feb. 5. I want to 
remind everyone that Repre- 
sentative Dennis Kucinich 
from the 1 (y District of Ohio 
is running again for Presi- 
dent in the Democratic Pri- 
mary. He has extended his 
hand to participate in every 
debate and has been denied 
this opportunity. Please lend 
your ear to his ideas for 
green-collar workers and for 
non-for-profrt healthcare for 
all. 

Know that he supports 
same sex marriage. Know 
that he supports reproductive 



choice. Know that he sup- 
ports fully funded education 
from pre-kindergarten to col- 
lege, as well, as fully paid 
day care-we have the money. 
Remember that he has al- 
ways opposed the war in Iraq 
and has consistently voted 
against funding this war. 
Kucinich has emphasized the 
connection between global 
warring and global warming- 
we need to end our reliance 
on oil and prioritize wind and 
solar energy. 

He believes in water as a 
human right. He stands by 
our Constitution and our 
Civil Liberties. Read for 



yourself, if you'd like, in his serve each day in America. 



books A Prayer for America 
and The Courage tp Survive. 
Pertiaps you will find that he 
is a lot like any one of us- 
capable and grateful for the 
opportunity to work and 



Marie-Louise Jackson- 
Miller 
Eim Street 
(Editor's Note: Kucinich 
has since dropped out of the 
race.) 



Thank You Quincy Police 



On Sunday, Jan. 20, as I 
was leaving church I slipped 
on a patch of ice, skinning 
my knuckles and the back of 
my head. 

My first thanks go to 
Michael and Jane Brundge, 
who picked me up and led 
me to my car. When I got 
home the Quincy Police 



called to ask if I was all right 
and did I live alone. Fifteen 
minutes later a policeman 
was at the door making sure 
I was ok. 

Despite the current furor 
it is nice to see that Quincy 
Police do care. 

John A. Laukkanen 
WoodcliffRoad 



Thank You And Best Wishes, Rev. Thomas Pang 



For several years Rev. 
Thomas Pang has headed the 
Chinese Ministry for the 
Episcopal Diocese of Massa- 
chusetts. In that capacity he 
has been one of the leaders 
in encouraging Asians to par- 
ticipate in the cultural and 
political life of Quincy. 

Foot Screening 
For Seniors 

Podiatrist Dr. Jordana 
Szpiro will be available to 
seniors for foot screening on 
the first Monday of every 
month at the Council on Ag- 
ing office, 83 Saratoga St. 

The doctor will also treat 
your feet for a fee of $25 per 
person payable at the time of 
the visit. 

F(Mr more information or 
to make an a{^intment, call 
the CCA at 617-376-1506. 



He has ckveloped an ac- 
tive Asian congregation at St. 
Chrysostom's Church. He 
has initiated successful so- 
cial service programs that 
serve not just that congrega- 
tion, but the wider Asian 
conmiunity. Rev. Pang has 



facilitated bilingual candi- 
date forums, voter registra- 
tion drives, and general civic 
education. 

His success here has led 
to a two-year evangelization 
in the Chinese territory of 
Macao, beginning in Febru- 



ary. During his absence, his 
leadership will be missed. 
Thank you. Reverend Pang, 
for your contributions to the 
community, and best wishes 
in your new assignment. 
Joe and Kate Shannon 
Ridgeway Drive 



■ ■■■■a SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■ I 

FELL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



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ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ 11 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

[ 11 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ 1 CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR our OF STATE $38.00 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

$5.50 Tax Rate 
Increase Estimated 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

The 1 963 tax rate shapes up to approximately $82.80, and 
increase of $5.50 based on the budget Mayor Amelio Delia 
Chiesa will send to the City Council 
after he spent the weekend 
completing cuts from the requested 
appropriations of department heads 

This advance estimate is subject 
to considerable variations since there ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
are four big question marks in the 
formula: the 1963 property valuation, the cost of snow 
removal for the rest of the winter, the figures on the so-called 
"Cherry Street" and the mayor's final decision on estimated 
receipts. 

DEADLINE NEAR ON 
PLANS FOR DREDGING OF RIVERS 

Maritime firms and other parties interested in the proposed 
$12.5 milhon dredging project in the Town and Fore Rivers 
have only one more month to present their views before the 
Board off Engineers for Rivers and Harbors. Mayor Delia 
Chiesa was informed today by Col. P.C. Hyzer, division 
engineer, U.S. Army Engineers. 

The district engineers have reported favorably on the big 
project, which involves deepening the present 27-foot Fore 
River to 35-fect. 

In addition to the general costs borne by the Federal 
Government, the State would have to assume the cost of 
about $1,540,000 for making alterations on sewers under 
Fore River. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Remick's of Quincy was urging potential customers to 
"Save Now" by buying Atlantic Plaid Luggage "20% Off: 
For Two Weeks Only". . . Mr. and Mrs. Cesidio Tempesta, 
28 Lortng St., West Quincy, celebrated their 50^* wedding 
anniversary at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Anna Emond . . . 
Judge Lewis Goldberg, justice oif the Massachusetts Superior 
Court, was scheduled to be the guest speaker at the annual 
Brotherhood Week service at Temple Beth Israel Synagogue, 
Grafton St., Quincy Point. . . George E. Hamilton, presided 
over a meeting of the Mr. and Mrs. Qub of the Adams Shore 
HUB Community Church. Committees for 1 %3 were named 
at the meeting held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin 
Black, 504 Sea St... Carmen Mariano of 19 Woodward 
Ave., Quincy, was one of a number of South Shore area 
students to participate in the Jimior Science Symposium at 
Mass. Institute of Technology. Carmen was a student at 
Archbishop Williams High School in Braintree... Robert 
Burgess of 1 12 Arnold St., Quincy Point, retired from the 
Fore River Shipyard. A native of England, he had worked at 
the shipyard since 1918... Over 200 people attended the 
"newly reconstructed" bungalow of the North Quincy Knights 
of Columbus. The keys to the building were presented to 
Michael Faherty, president of the Building Association, by 
architect Joseph Donahue. Construction costs were 
$85,000... Capitol Super Markets, Hancock St., Quincy 
Center, was advertising "U.S. No. KSize A) Maine Potatoes, 
25-pound bag for $.69". . . Quincy's two baseball "diamond 
stars" were scheduled to be honored at the Surf Ballroom in 
Hull. Sam Meie, manager of the Minnesota Twins and Dick 
Donovan, a pitcher for the Qeveland Indians. Both individuals 
have been highly commended by the State for their ability, 
sportsmanship and success... Hancock Tire, 115 Franklin 
St., South Quincy, was offering "A Big 13.2 cubic foot 
Refrigerator that Defrosts Automatically" for $259.95... 
Gerald Crowley, 1405 Quincy Shore Boulevard, Quincy, 
was named Manager of United Shoe Machinery Corporation' s 
Industrial Machinery Division. . . Quincy Junior College, A 
Community College Serving Quincy and the South Shore, 
was offering "New Afternoon and Evening Courses with 
Low Tuition. $12 per Semester Hour for Quincy Residents 
and $14 per Semester Hour for Non- Residents '. . . Mr. and 
Mrs. John Fantucchio, 1 3 1 Bunker Hill Lane, welcomed a 
daughter, bom Jan. 28 at Quincy City Hospital... State 
Senator James S. McCormack (D-Quincy), making his 
first speech as a member of the Massachusetts Senate, upset 
an adverse committee report and had his bill for bathhouse at 
Wollaston Beach sent to the Ways and Means Committee . . 
Harold H. Sate, fcvmer Quincy Boy Scout Council president, 
was awarded the Scouting Silver Beaver Medal at the 44*^ 
annual banquet of the Council held at the Masonic Temple. 



Pl«C< 



31. 



Ai2TS & Entertainment 



MUiri*'^ 




BY MARIE D'OLIMPIO 




Artichoke Recipes For Super Bowl 






As far as combinations are concerned in 
the food category, a popular favorite is arti- 
choke hearts and spinach. 

I made a pie with both of them, which and 
can be made ahead so when you're watching 
the Super Bowl on Sunday, you just have to 
cut it and put m the microwave, or place in a 
wanning oven. 

I bought frozen artichoke hearts unsea- 
soned in a bag. They are also available in the 
box. 

It didn't need any kind of crust, it just 
makes its own and it's more calorie friendly. 
It even tastes better the day after. 
ARTICHOKE, SPINACH PIE 

8 ounces or so of artichoke hearts (if 
froxen Just defrost enough hut not thor- 
oughly) 

1 pacluige of chopped spinach (defrost 
and then drain out the liquid) 

6 eggs (beaten) 

1/4 cup of flour (optional) 

1/2 cup parmesan or Romano grated 
cheese 

1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese (or 
favorite) 

salt and pepper to taste 



Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, 
beat the eggs and then add all of the other 
ingredients until well blended. Reserve a 
little of the shredded cheese for the top. 

Place in a greased pie plate or square 
baking pan and balce for 30-35 minutes until 
done and clear after tested (I use a toothpick). 

Here is an artichoke dip from our daughter 
Ann Marie which also can be reheated the 
day after. 

HOT ARTICHOKE DIP 

1-14 ounce of artkboke hearts (unsea- 
soned) 

2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese 

2 tablespoons low-fat sour cream 

1 teaspoon lemon juice 

a few dn^ of hot sauce (optional) 

1/4 cup low-fat yogurt. 

paprika for topping 

Place all of the ingredients except the 
yogiirt and paprika in a processor or blender 
and chop until finely done. Add the yogurt 
and stir well. Spoon into a one quart baking 
dish and sprinkle it with paprika. Bake in a 
350 degree oven for 25 minutes. Serve with 
breadsticks. 




FIVE QUINCY YOUNGSTERS are members of the Boston College High School Concert Chob-. 
They are: Mark Hogan (third row, third fkt>m left); Eric Jankkurl (second row, fourth fhun 
left); Ryan Law (second row, seventh from Ml); Donald Lnchhii (front row, second tnm left) 
and Joseph Prlndpato (third row, sixth fktan left). 

Quincy Youths Tour The World 
With B.C. High School Choir 




SUPER BOWL PAIRTY 



*Dme-mCMy 



Super Bowl XUt begins at 6^17 pm 

25^ WINGS AU Day! Noon to 10pm 

60 oz Pitchers - $7.00 

Bud, Bud Light & Michelob Ultra 

Free Buffet at Halftime 
Free Postgame Jukebox & More 

CaU 617'786'9804 

For Special Prices 12 piece := $6 JO 

For Ikkeout Buffiiiio Winss 24pieces$12^ 

For Your Super Bowl Party! 50 piece = $23.95 

Served witli lilue cheese dre«Bg and celery sticks. 
Be warned, they are pretty spicy! 



23 DcsMoincs Road • QllilK^ Point 



i\trv (.r-l"I.V.ll l.tK*. Ill i.i" "N(. ''SM4 



Five students from 
Quincy - Mark Hogan, Eric 
Jaukkuri, Ryan Law, Donald 
Luchini and Joseph 
Principato - are members of 
BC High's Concert Choir, a 
group of 29 young men who 
have become world-travelers 
of late. 

After a Christmas 2(X)6 
performance in Washington, 
DC at the White House, a 
spring break tour of Prague, 
a June performance at the 
Von Trapp Lodge in Ver- 
mont, the choir spent a few 
days after Thanksgiving on 
a whirlwind musical tour of 
DubUn, Ireland. 

Under the direction of Dr. 
Marina Rozenberg of 
Quincy and guided by En- 
glish faculty Gene Holmes 
'72 and Jeff Toto '99 (who 
also sing bass), the choir had 
the chance to visit - and sing 
at - some of the most famous 
landmarks in Ireland. 

The (Thoir started its visit 



The All New 



SI honi ry/ inu"sic- 



with a stop at Ireland's larg- 
est church, St. Patrick's Ca- 
thedral. There, they joined 
voices in an impromptu 
hymn. Medieval Glorias, 
much to the delight of nearby 
tourists. The singers then 
moved from the exalted ca- 
thedral of the saints to the 
lowly confines of the con- 
demned - Kihnainham Gaol, 
where many of the leaders of 
Irish rebellions were jailed 
and executed. That evening, 
they sang the Mass at St. 
Joseph's Church, the home 
parish of Mary McAleese, 
the President of Ireland, and 
after Mass serenaded the 
faithful in Latin, Russian, 
Italian, Spanish, and English 
with an eleven piece set. 

The highlight of the tour 
was a friendship concert with 
the young women of Notre 
Dame Secondary School in 
Dublin, where the two 
groups sang together and 



n 

Give the Gift 
OfMusic! 

Gnmd Re-dpwiing Secmri 



• |t«*«ltoM(k 



DiiiwItMSMrfMcitdl 

I 1111111% l«iy#iiiHfcSimtWw 
OMvlKlilpMfllkfll. Wt M mr on Hm 



0«it*r. Wmt, I>niiirii, Piano. 
ffiiiii|itHW CIviiMt, Hute. Ghm, 
Bassoo«.nitiiipet. IMmbone. 
Violin. VWl. Cello. mA Mandeia 



: Theory. Ev Traiing. 
AfTMii^^ Soi^wnuaf, 
Recordint TMHHlogy 




781-337-8500 



^ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy. MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Ume of SuppBet 
FreeEitkmH* 



bridged the cultural divide 
with a post-performance 
pizza party. 

In April, the choir will 
complete the final leg of their 
international tour in grand 
style by traveling to Russia 
where they wiU perform joint 
concerts with the Sergiev 
Posad Chamber Choir and 
tour the city of Moscow be- 
fore traveling to Kazan to 
participate in the prestigious 
Kazan State Music Festival 
as guests of the Kazan Con- 
servatory where Dr. 
Rozenberg earned her de- 
grees. 

he Boston College High 
School Concert Choir will 
perform at home this spring 
at the Annual Spring Concert 
in April and the Catholic 
School Choir Festival May 
10 at BC High. 

Boston College High 
School is a Jesuit, Catholic, 
college-preparatory school 
for young men founded in 
1863. The school enrolls 
^proximately 13(X) students 
from some 100 conmiunities 
in eastern Massachusetts. 

Food Fair At 
FR Clubhouse 

A food fair is held every 
third Wednesday of the 
month from 9 a.m. to 12 
no<m at the Fore River Club- 
house, 16 Nevada Rd., 
(Quincy Point. 

Perishable food, such as 
foiiit, vegetid>Ies and bread 
are available for $1 per bag. 
The (vogram is open to any- 
(me. 




^mAXi.i,»»memmi^im»^m 




Super Bowl Sunday 

(T) February 3rd 

Doors Open at Ipm 
/|^ Bingo at 2pm 




Hmnday, January 31, 2008 Thm Ottinioyghm Page 7 



SCCIAL. 




Quincy Symphony Orchestra 
Winter Family Concert Feb. 10 



The Quincy Symphony 
Orchestra will present a Win- 
ter Family Concert Sunday 
Feb. 10 at 2:30 p.m. at the 
North Quincy High School 
Performing Arts Center. 



The orchestra will per- 
form "Peter and the Wolf 
with Heidi Dallin, narrator 
who recently played Hillary 
Clinton in the New England 
premiser of Hillary and 



Quincy Students Named 
To Nat'l Honor Society 



FIRST NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT in Quincy Center was provided by the youngBters from 
Beechwood Musk Sciiool under the direction of Eniko Koyne. (Front Row, left to right) Olivia 
Liang, Luke Moiloy, Vanessa Lee, Lilly Austin, Maria Theodore, Larissa Liang, Roy Platteel, 
Liam Wilson. (Middle row, left to right) Sarah MoUoy, Krista WiUdnson, Heather Pettfaie, Kathy 
Doolin. (Back row, left to right) Georgios Cortomeros, Demetri Cortomeras, Raymond Platteel, 
Eniko Konye, RoUand Platteel, Joseph Browning.For the past 17 years. Director Koyne has 
taught music at Beechwood for the Bay, 440 Squantum St 

Josiah Quincy Jr. Subject 
Of Historical Society Talk 



Boston College Law 
School Professor Daniel 
CoquiUette will lecture on 
the forgotten patriot, Josiah 
Quincy Jr., Thursday, Feb. 7 
at 7:30 a.m. at the Quincy 
Historical Society, 8 Adams 
St., Quincy Center. 

Quincy, a native of 
Quincy (then Braintree) who 
died in April, 1 775, at the age 
of 3 1 , was described by John 
Adams as "an ardent a patriot 
as any of his age and next to 
James Otis its greatest ora- 
tor." 

CoquiUette is co-editor of 
a planned five- volume edi- 
tion of Josiah Quincy 's writ- 
ings, published by the Colo- 
nial Society of Massachu- 
setts and the University of 



Virginia Press. Two volumes 
are already out. 

His talk will focus on 
Quincy 's "Southern Jour- 
nal," a frank diary of 
Quincy's 1773 travels 
through the southern colo- 
nies as a representative of 
Massachusetts' Committee 



of Correspondence. 

CoquiUette has served as 
a cleik for the U. S. Supreme 
Court, dean of Boston Col- 
lege Law School, visiting 
professor at Harvard and 
Cornell Law Schools and 
partner in the firm of Palmer 
and Dodge. 



River Bay Club 
Presents Big Band Music 



The River Bay Club wUl 
have a celebration called 
"Music of Our Lives" Feb. 
21 at 1 p.m. at the facility. 
99 Brackett St. 

This event, which focuses 
on the Big Band Era of the 
1930'sand40s wiU feature 
"A Swingin Affair" with 



Donnie Norton, who will 
provide the vocals. 

Refreshments will be 
served and tours will be 
avaUable. For more informa- 
tion, contact Rob Sokoloff, 
director of sales and market- 
ing at the River Bay Club at 
617^72-4457. 




Cm *trr* 



Est. 1972 by RusseU Affsa 




STL VI 

STYLE 



Whatever Your Style 

We Can Do It. 
We now have later hours 
Call for your appointment today. for your convenience 




Twelve juniors and one 
senior from Quincy have 
been inducted into the Rob- 
ert J. Fulton, S.J. Chapter of 
the National Honor Society 
at Boston College High 
School. 

They are senior William 
P. Tam and juniors Edward 
W. Adams III, Conor P. 
Flaherty, Anthony Lau, 
Kevin Lee, Donald Luchini, 
Kevin M. Mahoney, David 
Nguyen, Patrick F. 
O' Donovan, Gregory M. 
Ouelette, Alex Pepjonovich 
and Richard F. Rii^s. 

The National Honor So- 
ciety was estabUshed to pro- 
vide recognition to high 
school students who have 
clearly distinguished them- 

Senior Trips 
To Foxwood 

TIk Council on Aging is 
offering trips for seniors to 
the Foxwood casinos in Con- 
necticut on the first Thursday 
of every month. 

The wiU leave at 8 a.m. 
from the red brick building 
on the left hand side of Vic- 
tory Road in Marina Bay. 

The cost is $25. 



selves in their school and 
community for scholarship, 
character, leadership and ser- 
vice. 



Monica. 

There will also be music 
by Tchaikovsky, Glinka, 
Bernstein, Copland and 
Leroy Anderson. 

Parents are encouraged to 
bring their children. Tickets 
may be purchased at the 
door. Adults, $17, seniors 
and students, $12, children 
under 12 with an adult, $5. 

If the concert is post- 
poned due to severe weather, 
it will be held Tuesday, Feb. 
12 at 8 p.m. 






JEWELRY 



I^0l50n Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family: Al - Dave - Mark 

795 HANCOCK ST.. (Hancock & Clay Sts.) 617-786-7942 

February Birthstone is Amethyst • Handicapped Accessitiie 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unity Candles 



Rosary Beads 



Mon 




25 BEALE STREET 



6:30pm 



SOCiAL CENTER 



WOLLASTON 
(617) 471-4I990 



SONS OF ITALY 

Social Center 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy 

Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs.. 

Call about our Wedding Packages... 

617-472-5900 www.QuincySOI.com 



FUNCTION HALL 



THE TIRRELL ROOM 

QUINCY ELKS 

As advertised in New England Bride 

www.tli^iiTellrooiii.coiii 

Weddings * Banquets ♦ Showers * Birthdays * All Occasions 
254 Quarry St. Quincy 617-847-6149 



FLORISTS 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 

761 SO. ARTERY, QUINCY 

617-773-7620 



FUNCTION HALL 



ADAMS 
HEIGHTS 

All Occasions 
63 Bower Rd., 

Quincy 
617-773-4750 



This Space 
Available 

To Advertise 
Here, Call 

617-471-3100 



. • • > .• ,• 



Pars 



31. 



Accounts Running Heavy Deficits 

City Council Rejects 

Senior Water/Sewer 

Discount For Now 



The City Council's 
Ordinance Committee 
Monday rejected a proposed 
ordinance offering senior 
citizens and low income 
homeowners a 15 per cent 
annual discount on water and 
sewer bills. 

Members opposed the 
discount after learning the 
water and sewer enterprise 
accounts are running at a 
multi-miUion dollar deficit 
this year and after members' 
objected to a blanket discount 
for seniors without 
establishing a means test and 
income levels. 

Committee members 
agreed to reconsider the 
discount proposal submitted 
by Ward .*> Councillor Doug 
Gutn> at a later date provided 
income maximums and other 
changes are inserted in the 
measuri's language. 

"\\\ like \o re\ isit this at a 
later date." said Ward 6 
Couiuillor Bnan McNamee 
\^ho also called tor "a lull 
scale examination from the 
tv'p di>wn*" of the water and 
se\\ci funds and additional 
ettoils in collections. 

Ciutro said the initiatne 
unuld on In ha\e cost each 
ratepayer i>ne dollar a month, 
but he acknowledge that the 
proposal needed some 
adjustments before new 
consideration. 

Auditor Rick Fitzpatnck 



informed councillors that the 
water/sewer funds arc 
currently running at a $3 
miUion to $8 million deficit. 

"It may necessitate a 
complete audit," said 
Fitzpatrick. He stated that if 
there is a shortfall at the fiscal 
year's end, the funds would 
have to come from taxpayers, 
rather than ratepayers. 

"We would attempt to 
recoup all of those indirect 
costs from the general fund." 
said Fitzpatrick who added, 
"We're all committed to 
correcting this potential 
shortfall." 

"How did we get here 
without a red flag going up?" 
Gutro asked. 

Fitzpatrick outlined the 
areas impacting the fund. In 
the first place, he said. 
"People aren't paying their 
bills on time " He also said 
there is lower consumption. 

In addition, the sewer fund 
appears to be a recurring 
problem because the city has 
■ ...consistently missed the 
mark on the sewer rate" b\ 
charging \oo laow a rate and 
the sewer fund has been 
charged "costs that belong in 
water" 

In addition. Fitzpatrick 
said he had expected that new 
commercial water meters 
would have been installed 
earlier under the city's $30 
million energy savings 



program. Those meters will 
now be installed next month 
and are expected to provide 
better measurements on 
commercial water use. . 

Finance Committee 
Chairman John Keenan 
moved that the proposal be 
defeated saying this is not a 
good time to put a new burden 
on ratepayers. 

'There's no income test 
on it," said Keenan. 
"Somebody else has to pay. 
Anytime you give someone 
a break, you pass it on to 
renters or a working family." 

In response, Gutro cited 
residents who had addressed 
the council earher in the 
evening. Those speakers 
described seniors' giving up 
cars and other sacrifices to 
keep their homes. 

However. other 

councillors were, also, 
reluctant to give the discount 
to all seniors. 

"You're just upping the 
bill again and again and 
again, said Councillor Joseph 
Finn and Councillor Jay 
Davis cited the problems 
facing young families, single 
moms, and parents w ho w ork 
two jobs. 

"The biggest issue I have 
is the (lack of) means test," 
said Davis. 

The council canceled a 
public hearing on the 
proposal and agreed to revisit 
the issue at a later date. 



Blood Pressure Clinics Free For Seniors 



Weekly blood pressure Aging, 83 Saratoga St.. North 

screenings for elders will be Quincy. 
held the first and third Mon- Gail Crawford, a regis- 

day of the month from 10 to tered nurse, will donate her 

1 1 a.m. at the Council on time and talents to assist se- 



nior citizens to have their 
blood pressure taken on a bi- 
weekly basis. 

For more informaticm, call 
617-376-1506. 



INTRODUCING OUR PRENATAL TEAM: 

Providing quality, accessible 
prenatal and well baby care for all! 




Marcia Tanur, MD 
Martha Kardiere, MD 
Director of Maternal 
and Child Health 
Jane Mqffie-Lee, FNP 
Laura MiiU^ys, FNP 
Irene Belsky, MD 
&ianTHjn Shevock, MD 
Kristen Penney, FNP 
Jenntfer Sabir, MD 
Linda Sdtofidd, RN 
Dame Marsters. RN 



tttD'JNttm.tn&fWkhc.(3i^ 



.|l>M^. SBV««ii» 



1979-JCAHOAeiTeditai 

For an appointment, please caU: 

North Quincy - 617-37^3000 HuU - 781-925-4550 

Snug Harbor -617-471-4715 Hour's Neck - 617-471^8683 



Tony Donadio On 
Campus Of Caring Advisory Board 



Quincy resident Tony 
Donadio has recently been 
named to the advisory board 
of the Campus of Caring, a 
iKHi-profit organization dedi- 
cated to building a home on 
the South Shore for use by a 
local non-profit hospice or- 
ganization. 

Donadio is president of 
Donadio Environmental As- 
sociates Inc. with over 25 
years experience in hazard- 
ous waste disposal, recycling 
and remediation services. 

Donadio is a member of 
the Licensed Site Profession- 
als Association (LSPA) Mass 
OU Heat Council (MOC) and 
the Building Owners and 
Managers Association 
(BOMA). 

He currently serves as a 
Knight of Don Orion at the 
Don Orion National (Elcferly 
Care) Center, a member of 
the Huntington Society and 
an active Alunmi Fundraiser 
for Northeastern University. 

Donadio has also served 
as an advisor for Saint 




TONY DONADIO 

Agatha's Parish in Quincy/ 
Milton and as a volunteer for 
My Brothers Keeper, a 
Christian ministry in Easton 
which delivers food and fur- 
niture to families in need. 

A graduate of Northeast- 
em University, Donadio and 
his wife MaryLou live in 
Quincy and have three 
grown children. 

"We are pleased to wel- 
come Tony to the advisory 
board where his leadership 
and commitment to helping 
others will serve our project 
well," said Campus of Car- 



Joyce Parcel Tour 
Set For Saturday 



A free w alking tour of the 
Joyce Parcel in West Quincy, 
recently acquired by the city 
with Community Preserva- 
tion Act funds, will be held 
Saturday. Feb. 2, 

Participants will meet at 
2 p.m. on Wren Terrace at 
the intersection with Forest 
Avenue. Hiking boots and a 
walking stick or ski pole are 
recommended. 

The tour will be led by 

Help With Simple WUls Monthly 

Atty . Ed Conroy will be at elderly with a free explana- 

the Council on Aging office, ^o" of simple wills. 
83 Saratoga St., North Call 6 17-376- 1506 for an 

Quincy, every third Friday appointment, 
of the month to assist the 



City Council President Jay 
Davis, School Committee 
member Anne Mahoney and 
Steve Perdios of the Com- 
munity Preservation Com- 
mittee. 

It is co-sponsored by the 
committee and the Park 
Department's Environmen- 
tal Treasures Program. For 
more information, call 617- 
472-0799. 



ing Board Member Ralph E. 
Tedeschi. "Tbny is a tnic pro- 
fessional and we look for- 
ward to woiidng with him as 
we move forward with this 
important community 
project." 

Campus of Caring is cur- 
rently seeking a donation of 
5-7 acres of suitable land on 
the South Shore. The home 
is designed with 12 private 
rooms to provide care for 
patients who are suffering 
from life limiting illnesses 
and is designed as a place 
where patients may live their 
fmal days to the fullest ex- 
tent possible in comfort, 
tranquility and dignity. 

The exterior design offers 
the look and feel of a private 
home with a firont for porch 
and shutters. The rooms are 
designed with access to fresh 
air and space for family 
members to stay. The home 
will include a non-denomi- 
national chapel and a family 
kitchen for home cooked 
meals. 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH MENU 



Monday, Feb. 4 

Pizza sticks, marinara 
sauce, fresh fruit, fruit juice. 
Tuesday, Feb. 5 
Early release day - no 
lunch served. 

Wednesday, Feb. 6 
Tuna salad sandwich, 
potato chifK, c^rot snack 
pack, fruit juice. 

Thursday, Feb. 7 
Happy Chinese New 
Year - Pork rib dippers, 
W2um apple slices with cin- 
namon ami cherries, dinn»' 
roll, fruit juice, fortune 
codde. 

Friibiy,Feb.8 
Egg patty with cl^ese (m 
a crois^int, strawbnry cup, 
fruit juio&. 



1 sold my home for a nice 
price and had more than 
enough to move to Linden 
Ponds." 




—GUm Croweil, 
momd from Quincy 



At linden Ponds, your 100% Refundable Entrance Deposit* gets you 
into a spacious, maintenance-free apartment home. The money from the 
sale (rfyour house can make your retireniait possiUe. A move to linden 
Ponds is the t>est financial decision you can make. 

Call 781-337-2255 today for your 
free Infoniiation Kit. 



I4NDEN Ponds 



m 





*Aapw the Rwiiteiicn) and Care Agreement 






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SUPER BOWL 

HEADQUARTERS 

15 Flat Screen T.V.'s 
Tons Of Prizes Given Away • Keno 

Table Top T. V. 's 

Free Gigantic Buffet At Half Time 

The Game Starts at 6pm 
So Get There Early 

GO PATRIOTS! 



www.commonwealthrestaurant.com 



79 Parkingway, Quincy 



617-773-3400 



PftlQ X;^ QuifMgr flttf^ Tliii|rt(lp^J«npM|or,31,2l||, 



Quincy College Awards School Pin To Nursing Graduates 



Quincy College's Associ- 
ate Degree in Nursing Pro- 
fessional Recognition Cer- 
emony was a memorable 
event for 62 of the school's 
nursing graduates. 

Family, friends, faculty, 
staff and some other very 
special guests recently filled 
Bethany Congregational 
Church in Quincy Center to 
show their support for each 
of the new graduates. 

With Pomp and Circum- 
stance playing in the back- 
ground, the graduates 
marched proudly down the 
church aisle as family mem- 
bers and friends popped in 
and out of the pews to take 
pictures. 

Kristin M. Parks, chair- 
woman of the Ass(Kiate De- 
gree Program in Nursing, 
welcomed everyone to the 
night's momentous (vcasion. 
She asked the graduates to 
stand up and give a round of 
applause to their family and 
friends for their love, support 
and patience as they (the 
graduates) spent the last few 
years completing their nurs- 
ing degree She then intro- 
duceJ the faculty of the nurs- 
ing pn>grani who also re- 
ceded a K>ud applause from 
the graduates. 

Among the list of speak- 
ers was Peter I'saffaras. 
c h.umian ol the Quincy Col- 
lege Board of Governors, 
.uid QuincN Mayor Thomas 
Kivh. who congratulated all 
ot the gr.iduates for their ac- 
conipJishinenls in the nurs- 
ing program. 

As Masor Kcvh brought 
his speech to a close he said 
to the graduates. "You will 




MAYOR TOM K(K H addresses graduates and audience with 
greetings from the city at the Quincy College Asiwciate Degree 
in Nursing Professional Recognition ceremony held at Bethany 
Congregational Church. 

college President Martha Margaret P. Rancourt, coor- 
Sue Harris and Sean Roper dinator of the Part-Time As- 




NURSING GRADUATES applaud after receiving pins. 



as the Professional Recogni- 
ti(m Speaker. Roper gradu- 
ated fn)m the nursing pro- 
gram at Quincy College in 
2(K)7. He reminisced about 
his time in the nursing pro- 
gram saying. 'Time has gone 
by fast and 1 have learned so 
much. I pray that you do 
great things." 

Awarding of the school 
pin was done by Professor 
Susan Cahill of the nursing 
program. While pinning 
many of her now-previous 
students, she received many 
hand shakes, hugs and kisses 
from the graduates. Some of 
the graduates were pinned by 
other faculty members of 
their choice and family 
members who are also 
nurses. 

After the last graduate re- 
ceiNcd her pin. class repre- 
sentatiN es took to the stage 
to bid their fellow graduates 



be touching many li\ es from farewell and good luck. 

here on out." The ceremony concluded 

Other speakers included with closing remarks from 



Sweetheart Ball 

ill .An/. I MiDiiui I'lik'i' 



You are cordially invited to join us for 

an elegant evening of delicious food and 

delightful company. Enjoy delectable 

hors d'oeuvres, festive martinis and 

dance the night away to the sounds 

of The Dave Caponigro Band. 

Don't miss the fun. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

5 to 7 pm 

RSVP by February 8 to 617.770.3264 



sociate Degree Program in 
Nursing, who looked onto 
the graduates with pride and 
tears of joy. In closing she 
said to the graduates, "I am 
so proud to have worked 
with you and for you." 
The RN graduates are: 
Mary K. Abdoo 
Joanne M.Amwine 

Christa Bartkovich 

Mary Anne Barry 

Paula Jo Beniers 

Kristin Bixler 

Alena M. Booker 

Jillian Brown 

Stacy J. Bums 

Susan M. Callahan 

Shirley J. Casey 

Stephanie M. Ciccketti 

Danielle J . Coughhn 

Mary I. DiBeneditto 

Liane C. Donaher 

Michelle L. Donahue 

Christine A. Donovan 

Suzanne L. Doucette 

Andrea M. Duffy 

Juha E. Eldridge 

Kelly A. Faghan 

Cynthia C. Farley 

Aleksey I. Filatov 

Tony D. Fisher 

Colleen M. Gadles 

Michael P. Hayes 

Jeremy W. Hartz 

Bradley S. Hendershot 

Katherine Z. Hurley 

Jaclyn C. Johnson 

HoUy C. Jordan 

Debra A. LaColla 

Heather L. Lemoine 

Sandra J. Mackin 




A GRADUATE approaches the stage to be pinned by Nursing Professor Susan Cahill. 



Maureen S. Makilya 
Karen M. Marchand 
Jaclyn K. McMillan 
Sara Meola 
Tonya L. Mortensen 
Angelina M. Moscato 
Lila J. Mueller 
Jacqueline Mukwayi- 
Sutton 
Kirsten M. Newell 
Diane O'Donnell 
Anthony V. Olorunsola 
EUzabeth S. O'Malley 
Patricia A. Pankievich 
Nicole R. Perry 
George Reed, Jr. 



Danielle E. Rousayne 
Robin L. Roy 
Denise M. Russell 
Lindsey I. Schoener 
Sharon E. Schwanke 
Marc A. Selin 
Luminita Serbanescu 



Meaghan K. Shells 
Janice I. Taylor 
Kristin M. Tkacik 
Kristen L. Utera 
Mary A. White 
Laura C. Wilson 
Kristen M. Wirtanen 



Food Fair At FR Clubhouse 



A food fair is held every 
third Wednesday of the 
month from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon at the Fore River Club- 
house, 16 Nevada Rd., 
Quincy Point. 



Perishable food, such as 
fruiit, vegetables and bread 
are available for $1 per bag. 
The program is open to any- 
one. 





ATRIA MARINA PLACE 

Four Seflfxxt Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 ( www. a t! rim t k Jo ifi £plc£e.cxMrn 



Over 45 years of setting the standard 

and leading the way for our youth 

and their future! 



Sacred Heart School of North Quincy 

370 Hancock Street • North Quincy, MA 02171 

617.328.3830 ♦ WWW.SHSQUINCY.ORG 



nMiw 



accredited rrmmber of NEASC since 1995 

Cwrently eimMng Pre-K thrcHigh Gra